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54

Do long domain names really effect user experience? Yes, in several ways: Memory Recall Long domains are difficult to remember. A shorter one tends to be more memorable. The mind can only recall 4 things at once in its working memory. Even then, the words need to make sense (and not keyboard mash). Source: ...


35

Let them change their name. A woman getting married takes the last name of her husband (sometimes), and not allowing her to change her name at a website could translate into a poor experience for her. I'm a big fan of option #1. I had to go look up my ID# here at the UX website to find I'm #5737. Out of sight, out of mind, in a good way. I don't know ...


23

While longer than desirable, 27 characters (including .com) is not overly excessive, but yes, long domain names do affect user experience. Some more than others. 'Power users' know how to avoid typing the address if possible. However, there are going to be some users who don't have a browser with a suggestive omnibox there are going to be users who ...


15

A solution to this some services have used is to have a separate username and display name. Your user name is your portal to the site; what you login as, what your URL is based on (usually), and sometimes how people find you. Twitter is probably the most relevant solution, as they have good SEO but they do have a display name you can change. You can't ...


14

I just thought of an option 3, which comes in a few parts. I'm probably being excessively verbose, but I want to make sure I've covered every case :) Only allow name changes every so often (three months should be fine to accommodate real name changes like the Jane Smith/Jane Doe examples above). Maintain a columns in the database of the past, say... four ...


7

No. People place the most amount of trust primarily in .com, .org, and .gov and secondarily in .net. All other TLDs are subject to additional scrutiny by your users. In addition if I just know your domain, but not the TLD you are using. I'm going to guess, and I'm willing to bet most of your users will guess ".com". .com should always be the primary ...


6

I have a Point 3 that is similar to the Point 1, but does not expose the ID of the user (which might give away some information). Instead, I would simply assume that a given username is, at any point in time, held by a single person. Therefore, the url can simply embed the time (or rather, date): http://somewebsite.com/2011-10-05/ausername Then it is ...


6

Optimize the page for search results that use the word cheap, but downplay usage of cheap in the actual content. (You could try putting the word cheap in the site's meta tags. Also add it in hidden transcript tags for images.) Maybe even use the word in a headline to grab attention, but in the product description, use synonyms instead, such as ...


5

I vote no for UX and yes for SEO (with a caveat). If your site requires a sitemap for a user to find their way around, then that's a smell that you have a poor information architecture. I don't buy the argument that they support users who know what they are looking for - like an index in a book. A website and book are sufficiently different that the ...


5

Probably the most common marketing copy to describe this is "most bang for your buck" (though I believe that's mostly an American saying). "Affordable" also conveys the low price without as explicitly implying low quality. If you could say it's "affordable performance/etc" you could imply you give performance/good feature, but at a low price. The good old ...


5

I think the CMS designers are probably right. The problem is that it is perfectly possible that certain pages are not valid in other languages - the entire site structure MAY be different between languages, and so the current location is not necessarily valid in a new language. Of course, your particular site may well be identical across languages, but if ...


5

One thing to remember is the concept of people being able to recall about 7 items (established by George Armitage Miller's work on memory) in their short-term memory. If your name consisted of words like: big, dull, hello, car, house; each of these is ONE item because they connect to something already existing in their mental schema/mind. If it is something ...


4

In short: It depends. Option One if it's a less formal/professional site, Option Two if more formal/professional oriented. I like option one. The various user groups I've worked with pay little or no attention to the URL, so unless you know url construction is an issue to your specific user group, I'd go with this. BUT, I have never worked on a site that ...


4

I don't think there is a significant difference between these two url from the perspective of SEO. if you want to improve your SEO by telling search engine crawler the language you are using, using html meta tag is a better approach: < meta http-equiv="Content-Language" content="en"> Furthermore, I don't think bothering users with "which language do ...


4

Allow users to change their name, but only once every few months. When they do, the old username should be blocked for a few months as well, so nobody else could use it. When somebody visits a blocked page, a screen should inform the visitor that the user has changed her name, and people should update their bookmarks if they still wish to be able to visit ...


4

Do long domain names really affect user experience? Yes. It will be annoying to your visitors. Remember, most people will visit your site on multiple devices, so they have to type that extralongdomainname.com on each device. It could possibly be detrimental to SEO. (Keyword Stuffing) As a side-note: Be careful with words like "Therapist" which, in a ...


3

As far as the internal search engine is concerned, if they are searching for 'cheap', its because they either don't know that they can sort by price, or because the interface does not allow them to. The first step in addressing the issue is giving them this ability (and/or making it clear how they can do so). Likewise, you should provide filters for other ...


3

Site maps are still useful in the same way that an index is still useful in a book that has a table of contents. It provides a different way of organizing information. A great website will naturally lead the users to where they want to go normally, particularly if they don't know exactly what they are looking for, but a site map is invaluable for quickly ...


3

I think this article has some helpful information: http://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-analytics-adds-split-testing-feature-google-website-optimizer-to-be-discontinued/44398/ Use rel=”canonical” to tell Google which of the test pages is the main page that should be indexed. Once the test is complete, use 301 redirects to redirect users and ...


2

Well, you will be hiding all these other categories from the users, so they may never know that they exist. If it's informational pages, I can understand the sacrifice, but if it's other product categories, then maybe in the long run it's in your best interest to display them, even at the cost of some users escaping. If you're right in your assumption that ...


2

This is an "it depends" answer, and I apologize for that. But I think the question can only be answered if we knew the goal of the SEO activities. If the main goal is to draw attention (that is visitors PPC) then yes. You would want to get attention from using the right keywords and get (ultimately) a lot of hits. But ... … if you want to sell anything and ...


2

This ought to be posted to ux.stackexchange.com. However, I think you should try to step into your users' shoes. If they click on the change language button (or whatever interface is used), are they expecting to be redirected to the homepage? I think in most cases, they probably expect to see a translation of the current page. To make this more clear, you ...


2

Basically, you have a cube I guess Each of these boxes can have multiple entries, and it's not necessarily 3 games for each country. I'd say, it doesn't really matter if you maintain one breadcrumb or multiple, what matters is to allow multiple entry points. As far as I remember, users don't really look at the breadcrumbs, and they aren't the only way ...


2

The title is an important identifier for a web page. It is used in various places by various user-agents, not only by browsers and search engines. Think, for example, about bookmarking (i.e. a list of linked titles). The title "About" wouldn’t be very helpful. Instead, "About – ACME Inc." would work much better. HTML5 defines (bold by me): Authors ...


2

I am gonna say - Sitemaps, Google Analytics, Meta Tags all come under SEO and are all essential factors for improving the visibility. Here are the things you can do to make things better: DOCTYPE declaration Character Encoding Title Tag (unique titles for each page) Meta Description Heading Tags Hierarchy (h1, h2, h3, h4) Keywords in Anchor Text Title ...


1

Is it certainly possible for search engines to link to a URL that has a fragment identifier ("anchored link"), but it is up to the destination page to know what to do with it. If the page is plain HTML with nothing dynamic or no hidden blocks, then the browser will scroll to the content identified by the fragment. ...But if the content is loaded ...


1

Yes, it does. At least in the way, that your audience might have problem to remember the address, can mistype it easily etc. That is the branding part of domain name. But there's a chance you triggered really good keywords and this value might overweight the disadvantages long domain name might have for branding.


1

A social timeline plugin such as the jQuery social timeline plugin at first seems cute - it's transitions are slick and it might initially seem like a nice easy way to amalgamate disparate information. However, therein lies the problem: that disparate information is distributed for a reason. Each social media network enters the market with a new and ...


1

You can use it when the events on the timeline are relevant to the website. I can see how the timeline of a companies (or whatever) page can be used as a sort of news list. Facebook is an awesome medium where people easily comment on a post or like something. It can show your popularity and how active you are. This can build trust. For example: You want to ...


1

I work in the central team of a corporation operating in 60+ markets and we have consistent feedback from local marketing teams that in countries with a low level of English as a second language that .com is a less preferred to the local equivalent (.fr, .es, .it etc). This is because users have been 'educated' that a .com on a SERP or elsewhere is less ...



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