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To expand on the "hallway testing" suggestions already mentioned. You can do the following things: Create a paper mockup that uses the icon without a label and ask users what they think it represents. If they don't know, start feeding them bit by bit to see how far they are from working it out. Then tell them and ask whether they consider it a viable icon. ...


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I haven't read stake exchange ux folks recommendations, so it can be a repeat suggested process. I would strongly recommend to follow AB Testing process. When you are testing especially the icons or two objects this would help. Follow the below steps. Show them a single icon with plane background and ask what they relate to. After you complete the above ...


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One question that comes to mind is are the functions/actions associated with those icons common knowledge or are they native to your product? If native to your product, one thing to think about is the primary action or purpose behind what they signify. You need to identify the expectations of the users for clicking those icons and create imagery aligning ...


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Since your icons all have labels, it seems to me that the labels are the crucial part of the UI here. As long as the icons are unique, it shouldn't matter what they are--as long as the labels are meaningful to the users. But if you still want to test the icons, I'd suggest a simple bucket-sorting type of exercise. Show the icons: 1. ----- 2. ----- 3. ...


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I am a big fan of hallway testing. Go find someone who has never seen your application (e.g. Sarah in Accounting, or your mom) and ask them for a few minutes about your application. You can just use printouts to make it easier to go from person to person.


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You have a few options, depending on your time and resources. Use a survey. Show the icon, and give the survey respondent 4 options for what the icon could represent. If you do this, you'll need a relatively large number of respondents to do the statistical analysis necessary to get a good confidence interval. Ask users what they think icons represent. ...


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I guess you could try and ask your testers what the icons mean to them. You could try this by giving them more or less context (about where the icon will be, what tooltip will be available, etc.) to see if they can guess what they will be used for.


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I think it's fair to say that Microsoft really managed to 'screw-the-pooch' on their Visual Studio 2012 icon re-design. Even after extensive usability test with positive results (approx. 50 users, but a poorly constructed test). It was the Beta program and community feedback that lowered the damage. Taking a lesson from this you may try some community ...



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