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12

I would argue that the shape itself has no (or at least very little) meaning. It is the color and the secondary symbol (exclamation mark vs. question mark) that provide the context. Any of the icons in your question are an equally reasonable choice for conveying "warning" or "caution". Even Microsoft's Standard Icons reuse the same shapes for both the most ...


11

With the little research I could find, there are primarily three polygons which are used in signs for hazards which are : Triangle : Usually used for caution Diamond : usually used to denote Warnings Octagon : Used to denote danger. To quote from the article I am referencing : SHAPES AND WHAT THEY MEAN: Here is a example of it being used in real ...


9

In a nutshell, the evidence suggests that users see rounded shapes as more 'friendly' than sharp shapes, and that sharp shapes, appearing slightly dangerous, garner more attention. Some go further and suggest that, as a rule, you should give almost all your divs and content rounded edges except for call-to-action buttons, which attract more attention when ...


7

Broad question, but the research is referred to as the field of Semiotics. There is a great deal of research and a good beginer intro is this site, as well as the Wikipedia link above. If you want general research you can search "semiotics" on Google Scholar but if you want specific research you'll have to ask a more specific question.


6

There is Graphical symbols — Safety colours and safety signs international standard. Having small set of easily recognized symbols such as circle, triangle and square you should use colors to increase your graphical symbol alphabet. So don't rely just on shape! UPDATE Also there is document from Industrial Accident Prevention Association, which contains ...


4

Highrise uses a group of buildings as the icon for companies: Wunderlist (todo list) uses a two person silhouette icon for the sharing option: I guess it depends on how the user will see the organisations, are they part of them or are they external? Do you want the focus on the people in the organisation or do you want to focus on the organisation ...


4

According to Golan Levin's presentation, the "father" of Gestalt psychologist W. Köhler already in 1927 conducted studies that empirically associated edges with rough sounds and curves with soft sounds. Some of the images and sounds he used are in the image below. Possibly that might map to a sentiment of roughness or softness in general. My personal ...


3

You have a few options, depending on your time and resources. Use a survey. Show the icon, and give the survey respondent 4 options for what the icon could represent. If you do this, you'll need a relatively large number of respondents to do the statistical analysis necessary to get a good confidence interval. Ask users what they think icons represent. ...


3

If organization equates to group, I'd say that a two or three person silhouette is a good way to go. This is used by Apple in OSX to indicate group permissions. My only concern with two-user silhouettes is that it may be equated to discussions/messaging, as used in Facebook's status bar. Here's one at IconFinder.


3

Not ideal without a label, but it might work for you. If this is the only button on the page, you might be able to pull it off. After all, most users do not read the labels of buttons they click.


2

I am currently doing my master's research in this area by having individual's model emotional labels. For example, they are given a set of interchangeable pieces and told to make an emotion. There is some base understanding of how people interpret the meaning of forms, but directly labeling them as emotions is very limited. Meaning and emotion can be ...


2

This answer is more from a practical, designers viewpoint. As you are asking for emotional context I suggest to have a look at artists of constructivism, like Mondrian and Malewitsch, who explored this area of shapes, colors and its impact some times ago. But on a practical way rather, than scientific. Which brings us to the synesthesia - an effect that ...


2

This is an interesting question. It might be worth looking at the world of Gestalt Psychology and Optical Illusions, as optical illusions demonstrate situations where the brain is struggling to resolve incoming visual data. However I'm not aware that this would result in experienced or subconscious emotional reactions. I also came this: ...


2

There is some research (try PsyBlog? can't remember source) that showed that people are more comfortable with rounder shapes and treat sharper shapes as more pointy/dangerous. It's in there with research showing, e.g., the contents of a heavier clipboard are treated as more serious than the contents of a lighter clipboard.


2

These icons might work better if the arrows pointed into the image. Move to Inbox This open top inbox is a pretty common icon. Perhaps a message/document inside would be helpful. Move to Archive A cardboard box, taped closed. A cabinet or safe might also work. One concern is these icons are visually very similar. This could help users associate them as ...


1

One question that comes to mind is are the functions/actions associated with those icons common knowledge or are they native to your product? If native to your product, one thing to think about is the primary action or purpose behind what they signify. You need to identify the expectations of the users for clicking those icons and create imagery aligning ...


1

It depends. If, in your application, an organization means nothing more than 'a group of people' (rather than an entity with properties in its own right), my icon would be nothing more than, say, a trio of people (along the lines of Melee's answer, above). If, on the other hand, an organization is significant in its own right, and does have a purpose ...


1

To me, this is a perfectly reasonable question. It has to do with mental models. Graphic design is part of UX. Go to http://iconexperience.com/v_collection/search/ Type in "Build", some of those work for me. Also "branch" sometimes makes sense, if it is an org chart.


1

We have no clue as to the colors and styles of other icons in your application, but I played around with a few samples as below and came up with the pair of icons at the bottom. I've included larger and smaller versions, and obviously they can subsequently be styled/colorized according to your needs, but the concept is clear and simple: an arrow going away ...



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