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10

Disabling selectable text is horrible UX for non-native speakers of the language the text is written in, who may rely on copy-and-paste to automated translation software or website to make sense of the text. This is becoming less of an issue with ubiquitous smartphones with high-quality cameras and OCR translation apps, but I believe it's still relevant.


1

Generally, there are two reasons: Clarity It's odd to have the text of a button or dropdown selectable. It'd be confusing for my cursor to turn to a beam, as if the primary interaction I will have is selecting/editing the text that is there. You could have an arrow cursor and still have it selectable, but that's weird too. Polish Selectable text is the ...


30

It's a myth that selectable text is "costless" There are visual elements containing text that users don't expect to be selectable. For example: Let's walk through why: Logos: some logos are based on text fonts and are even rendered as text. For most companies, it's important that logos are rendered faithfully so the idea of a user cutting and ...


0

One other case I have hit that is at least tolerable--a form that's asking you the same thing twice to reduce the human error factor. It's quite understandable that they might keep you from copying the text from one field to the other. What gets obnoxious is when they block pasting--what if you are copying the information from a saved location?


31

There is a reason when disabling the selection of text makes sense, and that is if selection of text could interfere with functional aspects of the UI. For example, it is frequently used on widgets that are draggable because you want to avoid that the user accidentally selects text when he intends to drag.


47

I believe the usual justification is to prevent folks from copying and pasting the content so that they don't steal it. I usually roll my eyes at this because if a user really wants that text, you can get it one way or another, even with selection disabled. I came across another example: a developer wanted to disable selection because double-clicking a ...


6

The simple answer to this question is NEVER. Restricting the ability to select text won't keep competitors from stealing your content but it will make it virtually impossible for customers to easily share it.


4

Reduce cognitive friction by limiting the number of choices There are almost 17 million possible hex color combinations and limiting this to just a few options will reduce the cognitive load on the end user. I find traditional colour wheels really unintuitive for common colours ... I feel the same way. Traditional color wheels can be overwhelming so ...


0

Color picking is a common design pattern. There is no "ideal" widget here... ...because the right solution will depend on the needs of your application: How precisely you need users to be able to select a color (a professional designer may need #hex or rgb() interfaces for precise selection, a consumer will not necessarily understand a traditional color ...


0

I've found the CIELab color space, and its transformation CIELCH, feel far more natural. The "L" dimension corresponds to lightness and that fits nicely into a user's mental model of color. Unfortunately we couldn't find a color picker out there based on these color spaces, so we built our own little color picker (warning, shameless self-plug). Here is the ...


3

Put it in a grid 3x3 below. It will be much easier to handle - you will shorten the distance. Take a look at photoshop swatches for order. Also consider names for colors on roll over / title="red" - 10% of males are color-blind.


0

I would say option A(or B). It's a good visualization of which colors is available and that it's connected to the color selected by the user. The mouse movement for selecting another color is way better for this option compared to for example option C or D. Moving the mouse straight to the right(preferred by me as a right handed person) or to the left is ...


1

We provide retail and stock control systems so accurate capture of barcodes and serial numbers at high speed is important to us. For what its worth, here's what we do, but our target market might be slightly different to yours. Use a barcode scanner. There are bluetooth ones that interface easily to most mobile devices. Of course this costs the end user ...


0

Well, if you can do this using barcode OR manual input, and you say serial numbers are sequential, so both teh barcode AND teh serial numbers will have common characters, you can do something like this: 1- Offer the user to scan the barcode (include some hint message) 1.1 - If user scans barcode 1.1.1 - on success --> stop 1.1.2 - on ...


4

Let's face it, serial numbers weren't meant to be consumed by humans. Can you imagine going to the grocery store and waiting for someone to manually enter each and every bar code number for all your items? In your situation I think option 3 is your best bet but I don't see why you couldn't combine option 3 with option 2. If the bar code scanner is failing ...



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