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I wouldn't show nothing and prevent the user from continuing - That will only create confusion and frustrate the user. The best method for handling user errors is preventing them in the first place. You can't always do this entirely but usually there is something you can do, build some logic in your application that means the user won't have to deal with ...


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Train your users Start by letting your users know how to use the system, and define some common notices. For example: Explain the process Now, you can tell them that if they do something unexpected, they won't be able to do the task. You can also add a right click notice to explain EXACTLY what is wrong (and of course, tell them "right click on element for ...


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Perhaps a div at the top or bottom that expands when an error has been detected, and collapses when a new selection is made or a close button has been pushed? Animation, color choice, and sizing would be key to ensure that it's noticed, but isn't overly obtrusive.


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Here are some options to reduce cognitive load and make the task easier: Shorten your descriptions. 200 symbols * 19 options = 3800 symbols, which is roughly A4 sheet, full of text. Looks crazy. Substitute long description with short labels. For repetitive users this is OK, for the new ones provide some help/guide. E.g. "Home", "Professional", ...


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Considering your design layout, I really think the best option is to use either checkboxes or radio buttons (depending on whether the user can select more than one option or not). Below is a quick mockup of what I mean: However, if you have a large number of options, this could prove to be problematic. In that case, I would consider having your Section C ...


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In most (if not all) modern browsers and Operating Systems the menu of a dropdown is a separate (but not independent) object from the trigger. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This means that the text on the trigger can be safely truncated while the contents of the menu remain full length - Effectively showing the ...


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It's difficult to give a complete answer without understanding the requirements, but there is a (potentially) existing pattern in stock Android - the data usage tab. User selects the upper maximum by dragging the x-axis line up and down to set the maximum. Downside is it may not give you the required precision to select the value - but you may be able to ...


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If you only have room for one object, then you could use interpret a string like "unlimited" or "Infinite". Make sure you check for all possible input possibilities though! Capitalizations, different words, the number 0 is often used. As you can see, this is messy. A much safer and gradual option would be to have a toggle and a textbox (or other selector). ...


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Two issues: The green dot does not provide enough affordance because it's almost always used as status indicator, rather than input control. Fading out unselected tile reduces legibility. Given that this is a mobile app, I recommend going with something like this, because thick outlines make it clear that the entire tile is clickable. (vs. using ...


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Considering the purpose of this screen is to require "users to identify whether they are a teacher or parent," one approach would be to spell it out in plain english, simply say: To continue, please select what best describes you: [ I am a Parent ] [ I am a Teacher ] This approach is a bit wordy, but makes it very clear what is expected of the ...


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IMHO you do not need the label 'please pick from the list below' . You already have a title "User Selection" and the two options right down below, so the action to be taken by the user is clear enough, and you eliminate the clutter . And also I suggest you change the title a little bit : the user here is in fact selecting the " user mode" , and "user ...


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Personally, I wouldn't have known that the tiles were tappable. I like the aesthetic of the green dots, but it doesn't seem intuitive to that the green dot means "selected". Another thing to consider is the target area for selecting these tiles--do you really want the entire tile to be tappable? I would think that might lead to accidental taps as the user ...


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Without seeing the context within which your user selection choice appears, any answer you get will require a bit of guesswork on our behalf. However, at first glance, I have the following to offer: It seems relatively clear what you want the user to do, assuming this is located somewhere the user is drawn to. If it's lost on a busy page, then the user ...


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You don't state in your question what exposure your app has, or how defined the location needs to be. However, the best option for less literate users would be to ask them to enter their zip/post code (into a free text field). If your app is across national boundaries, then have the app ask them to select their country first (preferably by a drop-down list ...


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I guess, the original question does not apply to this case because what they've done is a usability bug. It has nothing to do with flat design. The latter just gives you guidelines how to reduce visual clutter. In no way it limits the usability of the product. For instance, grid lines have a much bigger visual impact than active/inactive, but they haven't ...


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TL;DR: Combination of both - choose a default, and inform users what happened. I'd suggest a notification along the top of the page, which is dismissed on user action, or when user navigates to next page without choosing an action: doesn't interrupt the flow for those users, where country was guessed correctly gives insight into what happened and how to ...


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Both your solutions are valid, but my guess you're asking this question is that you lack the insight on will they know under which currency and country they want to browse under from the beginning and/or when users will want to switch. i'd suggest a combination of both, where you ask the user to select when they 1st use the shop, and then educated the user ...



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