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1

There is no clear hint that clicking on an album will play it, which is definitely going to cause some users some frustration. I'd suggest that you provide some context. When the user hovers the album, if you are going to play, you should overlay a play icon to be clear that is what will happen. It may also be good to have different behavior depending on ...


0

If the user is in a "view" / "read-only" mode, then an un-intrusive auto-refresh while maintaining the user's place in the items is the best option. If the user is in an "edit" or "action" mode with potential changes to the item(s), auto-refresh should be temporarily disabled, and the user may be given the option to perform a manual refresh. However, the ...


0

Besides agreeing with Jigar, it also depends on the reason why objects are appearing/disappearing in the list: will they still be available after selection if, in the meanwhile, they could have been removed (this happens, for example, in a shopping cart if someone bought an article you selected a couple of minutes before completing your purchase, or in a ...


0

My suggested approach is to be little more smart: Auto Refresh: If the current page is auto-refresh, then please don't make the user lose their current position. Instead every time when there are new items coming in, show them a small message saying See new items. Clicking on which you directly take the user showing him the newly loaded items (by ...


1

It can be incredibly disruptive to have a screen auto-refresh while the user is midway through an interaction, so this is usually something you really want to avoid unless it is absolutely necessary. Unless carefully designed, it can leave users feeling disoriented or angry about the perceived loss of control over their working environment. If you need the ...


0

What you are describing is a very UX pattern, which is a policy editor. Generally, this entails selecting and editing a policy, and visualizing/editing the scope of the policy. Usually this results in an interface similar to what you sketched out, but with some adjustments: For the left hand column, it's unclear whether the checkboxes are controls or just ...


1

Material design doesn't discourage the use of checkboxes for mobile. The link posted in the question refers to a specific use of checkboxes as a way of selecting items (eg an entire row, or a group of controls, or some text). Checkboxes are not good for that kind of interaction because it confuses the function of the checkbox. There are several reasons ...


0

I can only guess, but I think the intention behind this guidance is that Google wants to eliminate the ubiqitious appearance of checkboxes as first column in every table, for (single or multiple) selection. I would agree with the statement that this is an explicit anti-pattern for mobile (while it appears often on desktop designs). As stated, first think ...


1

Prevent the error first Your error message is good and will clearly inform the user. But if you can provide a clue about this error at the outset, you'll avoid some user frustration. If this happens more than once in your app, that tiny frustration becomes cumulative. Start with a notes under the control heading. Something alone the lines of Section ...


0

You are between a radio button and a check box. A radio button is exactly one. And with a radio button if you select B then A is un-selected. A check box is zero or more. You want one or more. I think a checkbox is a better as you don't automatically un-select. Since there is no a standard for 1 or more then I agree with a message. But I would ...


8

Making the user unable to uncheck that last check box might be unnecessary since the last box that's checked might be the one the user don't want to be checked. This might be a better solution:


0

Can you allow the user to temporarily deselect all 3 checkboxes without breaking your app? If so I would allow them to do this and then provide the validation message when the last checkbox is deselected. I would rather be allowed to deselect the option I don't want and then select the one I do than the other way round. If it is some kind of live filter ...


2

Often, such lists are part of a dialog that has an OK or Next> button. This is necessary to indicate that the user has finished making choices. This button can simply be disabled when no choice is made. This is intuitive enough, even if there is no direct instruction to pick one or more options. Note that this option fails if you make your dialog more ...


0

You should give users the freedom to select but never pre-select the options for the user. You should give full control to the user for all the decisions that he/she wants to make. When you start pre-selecting options for him/her, user feels "not in control" and kind of "being pushed/forced" (even though that's not your intention). I would go with, 3 ...


1

Even I encountered this problem in the app I'm working now. I don't show any message, if a user tries and fails to un-select the last item. But better option would be to disable the last remaining option which is selected. This visually indicates that at least one item is needed.


1

Some ideas: If you sort by date, can't you make "Location Group" visible as an attribute in the same way Item Name, Item Details, and Date are listed? That way the distinction is still present. Its hard to say one way or the other without more context. I'm also not sure what flexibility you have yet at the wire frame stage, but you could also color code ...


-1

Yep, I agree that one should be selected by default. ----- Additional comment below ----- This really depends on the context and what kind of application it is: what the label is and the options provided. That being said, it is a positive experience to add what matters to the user by allowing her to select her desired option(s), rather than requiring her ...


2

What you have checked by default should be based off of the user's most common response. If it is most common for the user to select all 3, then default to all three checked and handle it the way you described above (I think that seems nice). If you aren't sure what the most common response will be, you might want to default to having none of them ...



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