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51

I believe the usual justification is to prevent folks from copying and pasting the content so that they don't steal it. I usually roll my eyes at this because if a user really wants that text, you can get it one way or another, even with selection disabled. I came across another example: a developer wanted to disable selection because double-clicking a ...


46

As you correctly point out, this is a typical problem you encounter when you have a set of only two elements: it's never quite clear which element is selected. It seems to be difficult to highlight or otherwise emphasize the currently selected element. In my experience, stemming mostly from user research we did, what works for one user, doesn't work for ...


38

It's a myth that selectable text is "costless" As a general principle you are right that text should be selectable. That said, since you're asking about non-selectable text, here are some cases to be aware of for disabling text selection. There are visual elements containing text that users don't expect to be selectable. For example: Let's walk through ...


32

There is a reason when disabling the selection of text makes sense, and that is if selection of text could interfere with functional aspects of the UI. For example, it is frequently used on widgets that are draggable because you want to avoid that the user accidentally selects text when he intends to drag.


29

First of all: why do you ask at all? Why not simply always send the gift card with the order? Who would object to getting more value than what they ordered? If you don't ask, you don't have your problem to begin with. Generally, asking fewer questions from the user results in higher conversion, so from that perspective, removing the whole question would be ...


27

If there are two options, you could consider using a switch/toggle instead of an arrow as well. Took this from Dribbble:


23

First things first; you're not really asking them to pick one plan out of 100 distinct options, you're asking them how many users they want. Make the form input reflect that. Technically on your end they are picking one from 100 distinct plans, but that's an implementation issue, don't make your users worry about it. Sounds like what you really want is an ...


23

You could use a source area (list of items) and a target area (drop zone), to which the user can drag items from the list. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The drop zone should clearly state how many items are need to be placed there. I suggest to use a text message that emphasizes the remaining count of items, ...


23

two rows of radio buttons as e.g. on the wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikipedia&action=history


21

Keyboard The Shift modifier is used for keyboard selection as well, and not just for single selection. No matter where you are, no matter how long the list, [Shift] + [END] selects everything from your current item focus to the end of the list, [Shift] + [PgDwn] one page (however that is defined). This also combines with the word jump of Ctrl where ...


20

The best interface is no interface at all! Have your site detect visitors' counties by their IP address. You can do this to 99.5% accuracy for free. Pete


20

I'd suggest putting a button that they have to press to complete the selection, and using that button's label text and active/disabled state to transmit the information you want to pass to the user. Something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The idea is that the combination of the selected options and ...


20

By definition, a filter is a tool that help users narrow down to a subset of results that is most interesting to them. Consequently, when a filter is active, the results displayed should be less than the total number of original results. For this reason, I find option B not intuitive enough. If I'm not mistaken, option B treats the icons using an additive ...


19

The short answer is no, don't use country flags. http://www.456bereastreet.com/archive/200604/indicating_language_choice_flags_text_both_neither/ The preferred method is to use the name of the language in the language itself (and watch out for diacriticals, language specific capitalization, etc).


18

download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You can go to a two Combo interface. The first one with all the choices, and the second one with all the choices and an empty field.


17

You give the entire list on the left side. Once the first item is selected show the selected item in right top window. Once the second item is selected show you can show the comparison between the two. Edited Components List (Collection of Nodes) Box A (For Node A) Box B (For Node B) On Mouse Over on any node show the option to select A or B (No ...


16

One solution is to show a magnified version directly above where the user is currently hovering. Look at how YouTube deals with seeking long videos, for example: This allows the user to select a rough time period they are interested in, then make a finer selection using the shorter-interval magnification. The Music app on the iPhone/iPod has a feature ...


16

Instead of double clicking to finish, you could: Click the starting point to close the shape (assuming all shapes are closed in) Have a button nearby labeled "Finished" or "Close Shape" or "I'm Done" etc. that closes the shape If you aren't able to use the OS to detect double clicks, I'd avoid them altogether. I've seen people with disabilities have the ...


15

A dropdown with 450+ values is extremely unusable on any device, including desktop. But you say that you're only looking for a solution for the basic mobile version, so let's stick to that. Probably the best way to simplify this for the mobile is to have a first screen/popup display the alphabet, then as you tap a letter you drill down to the list of ...


15

Not a complete answer, but some thoughts about why drag-and-select is not so good. Dragging with a pressed mouse button is physically hard to do. You have to keep a constant pressure on the mouse button, and if it becomes too light, your work is undone. Too much pressure and the mouse can't glide well, and the cheap ones feel like they will fall apart in ...


14

Having your cursor slanted would be a UX improvement over a permanently vertical cursor. Many word processors already do this. Here are some examples from MS Word: It gives additional feedback to a user that the text they enter will be italic, and it is visually less confusing when selecting text. At the same time, I can't think of any reason that it ...


13

If you have a default that will be true in most cases, you should consider using it. Otherwise, I would avoid pre-selecting radio buttons. The prime reason being that you have no way of knowing whether someone actually wants it selected or they just missed it. In addition to that, if your radio buttons are only a Yes/No question, then I would suggest using ...


12

First, connect list A to list B visually, possibly like this: Then also position the character box below both list A and list B. You would then have a clear hierarchy of connectedness.


12

Unless you have auto complete, a list with 450+ options is never very user friendly, and always hard to use, especially when you even allow multiple selections. Given that the task to add books to the library is a very common one, that should be done fast, I would propose a more simpler backend-powered solution using two simple steps: First the user is ...


12

There is no recommended maximum number of items to put in a drop down list. No-one can say the maximum is 7 or 12 or 200 or 10,000 and definitively say that for all scenarios, that is the maximum you should use. There is a myth for drop down lists and menus that you should not use more than 7 +/- 2 because that's how your memory chunks things, but that's ...


12

Windows default double-click time is 500 ms (half a second) Reference http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb760404(v=vs.85).aspx


12

Disabling selectable text is horrible UX for non-native speakers of the language the text is written in, who may rely on copy-and-paste to automated translation software or website to make sense of the text. This is becoming less of an issue with ubiquitous smartphones with high-quality cameras and OCR translation apps, but I believe it's still relevant.


11

Take a look at the bigger picture. What is the user going to do next? Probably not undo - possible but not probable? If the likely next step is to move another item from the left list to the right then you should leave focus on the next item in the source list, so that the user can move multiple items easily be sequential pressing of the arrow button. So to ...


11

Here are some exciting resources: Kuler A popular color-picker tool on the web, also available as a PhotoShop plugin. Color Scheme Designer If you don't know the science behind colors, don't worry. This will help you. Color by Hailpixel A very interesting tool which helps you select random colors with fun. Pictaculous Generates a color ...


10

I would have a fist checkbox called something more descriptive like "All permissions" or "Admin". I would then make the other checkboxes visible (or active) based on whether that checkbox was selected. This should be fairly easy to implement, and should be visually clear and fast to scan. Example mockup:



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