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1

We're dealing with this on a regular basis. We solved it by making the page blazing fast, inputting logic on the front side (for incorrectly or missed input fields), and then kicking back errors fast. Having dynamically updating pages is great. In fact, we're not using Javascript at all on our web forms (and we should be...we'll get there!) which is a ...


1

This is a good approach however I would limit the number of attempts and then not let them guess again. Lets say you stole someones credit card information digitally. All your missing is the cvc number. One could easily use the number then brute force the CVC if they get infinite attempts. Even with the 30 seconds I could write a distributed script that runs ...


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Seems like it is not easy to get an answer to this question, but I think it has to do with the way it is being asked. Instead I'll provide some general guidelines that will help you to work out a solution. In infographic design, there are a few key points that you need to work in with general visual design principles: Be faithful to the original ...


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You are correct, you can freely show the hint since the attackers will already know it. From this article - What's more, like the other two crackers profiled in this article, radix didn't know where the password list was taken from, eliminating one of the key techniques crackers use when deciphering leaked hashes. "If I knew the site, I would go ...


2

I think it is not a good idea, because It is uncommon to have password hints on a login. Users can misinterpret it as a register form. Login and register have huge similarity problems anyway. Password hints will increase the problem of a clear difference of both. You are not solving your root problem, which is a very unregular visit. Even with hints users ...


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I think its a great idea! Ceres why As Jakob Nielsen says you want Users to Recognize rather than Recall. 10 usability heuristics for UI design Why make users recall their password rules if you can give them a clue? If you want to sort of have the best of both worlds you can wait until they get it wrong the first time then give them a hint about the ...


2

The simple answer is that it is *assumed that the whitespace was unintentional." I agree fully that spaces are very useful for increasing the password's entropy BUT I think this is a very useful compromise as many people cut and paste passwords and would be frustrated if they were not able to gain access to their site. Re the issue of password security ...


2

This behavior should not pose any issue. The sites that trim passwords will trim them both on initial entry and on use, those that do not will not. If you use spaces in your password, and they are trimmed out, you won't even notice. Using spaces in the password does not enhance security any more than using any other character instead of space. But knowing ...


56

Good observation. In my experience this happens for a number of reasons, some intentional and some unintentional. Intentional reasons to trim whitespace: Users often cut and paste passwords (yes, use of Notepad as a password manager really happens) and the paste operation for some clients adds a whitespace. Phrase (multi word) passwords are ...



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