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If I understand your question correctly, you're trying to learn the user's inbound search terms and tailor your content accordingly, correct? You used to be able to do this by looking at inbound search terms from Google, but as of 2013, Google encrypted almost all searches so that it's no longer possible. It's a boon for privacy, but a defeat of a large ...


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Search controls and results should be on the same screen, as users probably need to change search criteria for complex data after reviewing results (you anticipate this case in your question). So this is results which drive the criteria changes: user uses results as feedback. Still, manual selection among hundreds or thousands records is a) a hard task for ...


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This is a typical use case, where search pagination can be applied. According to the Yahoo Design Pattern Library: When searches return too many results to display on a single page, separate the information into a sequence of pages. Provide pagination control, as a row of links, to enable the user to browse through more results than can be ...


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There is no practical reason for them to serve up the least relevant results. There may well be millions of results, but Google also knows that there is no way a human could look a them all since people tend to give up or try a different search after the first page or two. So they cut corners to make things faster. On page 37 you'll see this at the bottom: ...


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Google does a lot of testing, but that doesn't mean they've tested this issue. The use case that was described in the original post was "I use the images function on a regular basis.", so frequently that the text was no longer read, only the position of where the link is located. But location changes and causes the issue. This breaks the usability rule of ...


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They arrange the items depending on what you search for. I.E. searching for 'Tax' is likely to return many News results, so that is shown alongside 'web': Searching for 'Mexico Flag' is likely to return lots of images, so they set 'Images' as the next tab: Whereas searching for 'Bristol' (A city in England) returns 'maps' as the next tab: ...


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If the system can determine if the data is a Identity1 or Identity2, I recommend you to have only one field and only one submit button, and add a label (or placeholder) to explain that you can give a Identity1 or Identity2. For example, assume that Identity1 is a name and Identity2 is an address, you can have : More generally you can have something like ...


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As I understand, the user knows what he’s searching. So the user has to deside if it’s a task-search or a user-search. If the system is able to decide whether the input is a task-number or a customer-number one field would be better because the user would not be forced to decide. In the case, that there are hits on customers and on tasks you could ask the ...


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Can you first tell us on what grounds you decided what the future users of the interface with those search boxes will need? As you know, we are here to design for users, but you said that your team is more convinced by one or the other solution. I'm quite sure that you should test it with users of this specific industry. It's not a common scenario and we ...


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Do both fields behave differently or are the exactly the same but the user will want to put in multiple search items? If the user just wants to add multiple search criteria you could use an input with that accepts multiple inputs like Select 2.



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