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1

Ok, before anything: not only F-shape isn't the only possible pattern (it's just a common one, see more at 3 Design Layouts: Gutenberg Diagram, Z-Pattern, And F-Pattern ), but right now there's quite some discussion about whether does it apply nowadays or not. This being said, any pattern will change to top to bottom (or Gutenberg if you like) on mobile due ...


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SlickDeals.net has a "Deal Alert" system that's very similar to what you're describing. Users can watch certain keywords or item categories and receive notifications when new deals are posted in the forums that match their criteria. Here's a screenshot of the input form when configuring an alert: Google Alerts is another example where users can be ...


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What a thoroughly confusing widget - a search field which contains a drop-down tree control which is being used to filter by facet . This will be difficult to make keyboard enabled because you need to: expand the drop-down Navigate the folders Select a folder Get out the widget It will be easier for everyone (mouse and keyboard) if you created two ...


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A (top/bottom) bar navigation is a pattern that can be very effective, but isn't widely popular on Android. This is exactly the reason why you were able to find multiple iOS apps who use it, while Android seems to be "lagging behind". There are multiple articles talking about this in general, mostly how this tabbed navigation should display core features ...


1

In our program we showed an empty list with a message saying something like "Select your criteria and click Search."and users hated it. Apparently some were thinking that there were no employees in the list. We end up showing the first page (10 records) of the unfiltered list. I personally like the idea of showing the most recently "used" records. Meaning ...


2

In terms of a users experience whatever is fastest will be best. If you can get all records on the page and search them in the memory of the browser faster than you can send a search request over the wire that will be the better way of doing it. Unless you can know why people would be searching the employee records in some way I don't think you can possibly ...


4

Here's a different idea, what about a department list? Just brainstorming in terms of what people might be doing when it comes to looking at a list of employees. If I know the name of the person I'm looking for, I'll directly search for that. I'm guessing the 2nd most common case would probably be "I know the person is in XYZ department". Instead of ...


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The rule in ecommerce is to NEVER return an empty page after search. Show similar items or when the search query is to incoherent, show popular items or items on sale. But you're asking about default. If there's room you could show something. Recent searches would be a good one. Facebook displays those if you linger in the search box for a few seconds. I ...


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Unlike B2C shopping sites where you can display a list of popular items or new promotions, there is nothing useful that you can display when it comes to finding employees, so a simple search field would suffice. You might also want to consider including a department filter if it help the user to narrow down the search criteria (assuming your data model ...


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Index would make sense as most users may begin to get familiar with that order as usage of the app increases. The select2 plugin offers a nice way for the user to zero in on a particular Pokemon they are looking for without needing to scan the entire list. I would say use index for consistency with the app. If you could style the list similar to how it ...


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It's always challenging to do navigation for mobile. I go through this little cheat sheet to freshen up for the menu navigation possibilities. Regarding your problem, the solution you've reached sounds good. But, it's one thing to describe it and an entirely different thing to see it. It makes sense as you describe it, but that's different from making ...


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I personally understand the logic of this double-button and I think I would get the idea, but it all depends on the perception of every user. I see this solution as a purposeful ambiguity, which is meant to simplify the design. If it's bound to lead to confusion or not, I can't say, unless I take a look on the overall design of that page. I see two options: ...


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Yes!! Search is obviously the better word to use. but if the requirement says you to edit so you can also write something like "Total queries increased by 40%" "Queries increased by 40%" "write your query" "Looking for results for your query"


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You should have a button. Can you have a shorter input box and then place the button? You can design a button not so heavy visually and keep the minimal style to the rest of the website. do not sacrifice your UX over a minimalist look.


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Yes. Even if it's never clicked, the button is still useful. The presence of a button visually indicates that nothing will happen until you tell it to. If I saw a search bar with no search button, I would assume it would perform searches as I type. My first thought when I start typing would be "why isn't it searching yet?" Edit: Challenging what I just ...



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