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1

On Google map (for exemple) you have also one research input field to search many different things (restaurant, street, address, hostel...) So you could use the same behavior : A smart research, but I would add exemples in the input field, like this : You can compile this solution, keeping the category dropdown menu. Here the user has the choice.


2

I think search should be a 1-step thing and the categorization should be done by the software/app. If possible, allow the user to search in multiple categories. [Technically speaking, you can use Sphinx for this purpose] One good example of such technique is the older version of Spotlight on Mac. The user types his search query and the system categorizes ...


3

Just follow the established search form similar to Amazon one (see below). If the user doesn't select a particular category, then it would search all categories for that particular keyword.


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What you're looking for can be achieved by Filtered and/or Faceted Search. Basically, you use these filters to narrow the scope of the search, guiding the user through the search process and clearing iterative actions. For example, in your app: You can see some great examples, guidelines and "how to's" here


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I think Amazon has something which would be of interest:


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Can I ask why you believe using tags for information storage conflicts with 'a more structured and minimalist view about information architecture'? I think there's a good discussion in that alone. Forcing a user to create tags for information storage means it will always be relevant to them and there won't be additional/excess ways of organising their data. ...


0

Here's the only example I can come up with, from the current site of a client. The right column is for hits in a certain sub-section of their site. According to analytics, nobody clicks to the results in the right column. I imagine this is because the right column looks like an ad rather than results, and that the actual results are not listed there ("19 ...


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I'll disagree with others here. There are many use cases for displaying separated search results - but you've presented one that is superficially inappropriate. Many news sites use side by side searches on their home page and top level landing pages. E.g. Filtered searches for business, sports, world, etc. 3rd party Twitter clients often have side by ...


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A common solution for this is to include a "breadbox" which includes the values from each facet in your advanced search query as an easier to scan summary of the query. Often the values have an "x" next to them to allow for quickly removing them and resetting that facet. I would suggest looking into something like a popular searches list as well with ...


0

Just to clarify does the app run in a browser? If it runs in a browser the back/forward is particularly confusing, although if it's not in the browser it's not as big a factor (although still a bit weird given how used people are to browser behaviour!) Agree with the user above that renaming is the easiest way to deal with it, although I'd have a discussion ...


1

Could you provide your reasoning for displaying two sets of search results? The fact you are struggling to find examples of this is a good indicator that it is probably not the best solution. By separating the results you are removing the control from the user, halving the web page real estate for displaying your search results and are creating potential ...


1

What's the purpose of doing this? With a slightly better description of why you are doing it, may be slightly easier to find some results for you. Just having a quick look on the web I've found a couple of things. There's a report on 'Comparing Sets of Results in Context' that's a few years old but is a study into someone presenting information in ...


3

Yes, from end user point of view, back/home/forward means the browser navigation functionality. In an full page App, we should avoid those navigation naming that are confusing for user. You could suggest something like Previous | Reset | Next as the options. These will work as their name and will look like the buttons that client asked for. convince them ...


2

it depends on your design, but for this amount of categorization and filtering, the answer is a resounding yes. Just think of this: you use different fields for each of your categories, press the search button and (hopefully) you'll get some results. Now, if you don't add a "summary", how will the user know what he/she searched for, which filters were ...


3

This is a UX situation that occurs in many object-oriented or rich visual design programs where a visual objects onscreen have rich metadata. Examples: Computer Aided Design (CAD) for physical objects and systems Interior design (where materials and components may have a lot of metadata) Electrical circuit design Graphical programming languages (LabView, ...


1

I think perhaps looking at how programs that allow you to create diagrams handles the properties of individual elements will point you in the right direction. For example, Microsoft Visio, Balsamiq and Gliffy are all programs that allow you to create diagrams by abstracting or hiding the details for creating and displaying the shapes from the user, but also ...


1

Sounds like a good application of tagging! You could have a fixed set of tags that could be applied to each node, then a clickable list of those tags along one side or across the top, which serves as a filter. This could control highlighting for that category of nodes. Here's a (censored) example of Trello labels being used as tags: Similarly, tagging ...



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