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3

Don't do it There are several reasons: Pull-to-refresh is a very common mobile UX idiom. You are asking users to unlearn the idiom and learn some other behavior in its place, which is going to feel unintuitive at best and annoying at worst. You are asking the user to slide vertically to delete horizontally, which is going to feel very weird since there ...


1

I don't think deleting letter by letter is a good thing : User doesn't want to pull for 10s if he wrote a long word/sentence. Besides, the idea to coming back few step backward by deleting some characters in the search is nice, just do it according to the size or syllabe by syllabe. EDIT : Don't forget to add a simple visual content to make the gesture is ...


0

Why not have a sticky search button somewhere within the UI? (preferably at the bottom so the users can tap it faster)


2

To give you a concrete example: have a look at Command-T which certainly solves the first of your problems and does use such a dialog (displaying a list of files). It targets developers working with rather large trees of code files, just like the Visual Studio plugin you mentioned. Its core algorithm is based on subsequence matching which is pretty useful ...


0

Sometimes it can help to take a look at what the giants are doing for tricky usability questions like this one. Google, Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter do nothing and give no message. Bing and Baidu take you back to the homepage and give no message. Yahoo takes you back to the search homepage and gives no message. Wikipedia takes you to the search results ...


1

Yes, it's called page citation notation. The notation is based on formal text citations. For example, the ASA Lite and APA Reference standards use notations where page ranges are denoted by hyphens (e.g. 100-113) and multiple pages/ranges are separated by commas (e.g. 1, 5, 23-45). From the APA guidelines: Give inclusive numbers for articles or sections ...


0

I agree that you would want to make the most of available space on your UI. Let me tell you that you are not alone. I have seen applications using the practice you mentioned on Android. I am not sure of other platforms. It has always been annoying at first to operate that interface when the action button is missing on UI, but soon I got used to it. Should ...


0

Evil Closet Monkey is right, but I would like to add that even if the GO button is visible, it still is easily overlooked. People expect the keyboard to appear when an input has focus and therefore is meant for that input only. This will not count for all users but there will be users that look up at the app when they are done typing, looking for a button ...


2

That wouldn't be advisable. Take a simple interface... ... and now close the keyboard (something many keyboards can do, through a direct button press or other user action)... ... now what? It is not appropriate to allow the user to reach a state where they have to figure out what to do. In the above situation they have to tap back into the search ...


1

I'd put them at the right if you must choose. Unless you really need to filter your data to make sense of it, I'd tuck it out of the left-gutter view most people scan with. I've also has some really interesting usability sessions that suggest filters/search are confusing for non-techy people whom may rather just scroll. This all depends on the size of your ...


1

If the table is the only element displayed on the page, filters should be in a right or left column. and for tablet/mobile, just above the page title.


21

Some sites have "near miss" matches after their exact matches. If a user has exhausted everything precisely matching their criteria but is still looking, there's a clear line and an explanation that this is the end of the results, then "near misses" sorted by how close to matching they are. "Unspecified" would rank higher in this formula than "specified ...


0

Between is not clear - is that Greater than and Less than or Greater than or equals and Less than of equals With the time component people often prefer: Greater than or equals and Less than And users also might want an outside. Just let them enter P twice and on the second limit the operators to the other 3.


9

No. For the user to actively specify a color, then see colors which do not match their specification risks confusion and a lack of confidence in the accuracy of the tool. An alternative would be to add a sub-category of "Unspecified". If you want to do something really interesting, crowd-source the data in the Unspecified category and ask users to say what ...


3

Prioritize results with most relevant first: You can mitigate the issue by: Displaying this category of cars at the bottom of your search results so cars that do meet the full search criteria are presented first (higher relevance), only caveat here is to clearly emphasise visually and via adequate labelling the results that do not match the colour ...


0

We have seen such a functionality and the approach we took involves a dynamic third column. First two columns being parameter and operator, the third is dynamically populated based on selection of the operator. I'd suggest you to think about various data types too. Having a third column dynamic one can create probably a date picker, amount input, two ...


0

Here is how Google handles between in Analytics. Using only less than, greater than and AND, between is easy to achieve. With Include/Exclude you could also select the values not between two values. There is also "equals" selection in the operator dropdown also. So every operator visible in your picture should be available with the Google way. It only ...


2

The solution I've seen is to not use a fixed grid, but a set of fields as required. Each condition has its own row, containing the necessary fields. Since every operator needs one value, one value field is always visible. When the user selects "between", a second field is added for this row only. I have no specific testing results supporting or ...



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