Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I suggest keeping meta data on the type of each tag (i.e. social/primary) and source (i.e. Twitter/Facebook/etc...). This would allow you to weight the value of each tag later and make more informed programmatic searches or analysis.


0

Assuming users already entered the filter information before landed on the result page (e.g. most sites like http://www.hotwire.com/ have initial form before hitting the search page), it's unlikely that users will need to tweak the provided info again (look into your metrics if any). However, it is more likely for users to modify secondary filters that are ...


0

One suggestion would be to group them (like you suggested) and make sure they have clear titles/names. Perhaps even thinking of them like the way some academic articles/journals are set up - they have authors, title, date, summary - basic information but the rest of the information is in a PDF. Figure out what people might want to search about the PDFs and ...


2

If it's a website that has a lot of products in many categories, showing the category is a good way to help the user find what they are looking for. Example: when a user is searching for: game of thr Game of thrones in books Game of thrones in DVDs Game of thrones in eBooks Game of thrones Game of throubles Game of three and so on..


1

From what I looked on both sites, here's my opinion: What are filters meant to reflect? most likely filters and search are usually the same, but it may vary. For me search is what you entered first on open search bar(like google, bing, or your favourite search engine) while filter means you're filtering from existing search result. Or I also call this ...


0

Considering that this an e-commerce website it'd be very recommendable to give the search field more presence since it's very likely that the users will try to search for an specific product before starting the navegation through categories or other means that your site provide. Additionally be sure that the search works as expected, because in other cause ...


1

Roger has already covered the wide range problem, and I terribly agree with his proposed solution. The brain has limits What perhaps important to emphasise to the first half of the room is that the brain has limitations, and long list are not its friend. As a very rough figure, one research has shown that around 70 of similar items (search results) is ...


2

It's rarely a good idea to make up meaningful (non-decorative) UI elements just to balance out the screen. The point is usually to remove stuff, not to add stuff :). This is for all kinds of reasons - cognitive load, visual clutter, focusing the user on what matters etc. As to the problem at hand, you can tackle it in a number of ways. The important thing ...


4

You could show a reduced set of matches in relevant categories and add a method for the user to explore more if it's of interest. This way, you show the wide range on offer, and limit the display to only a few. The user has less information to filter themselves and so it's easier to decide what's relevant - i.e. what to explore or what not to explore and ...


1

GitHub does this quite well. When you're in a repo, the search field is set to search that repo with the option to change it to 'global'. When you're on a global page it defaults to global search, with the option to change it to 'users', 'help', etc.


0

What about a single field search with some options close by (checkbox or listbox "search in flagged only") ? If you don't have too many entries it can be a good solution. Anyway if you have multiple research field (but I woulnd't recommand it) you should indicate clearly what the search is about "Research in flagged only" in the field. (look at google page) ...


4

Assuming you want to avoid hierarchical categorization, you can use freeform category tags to apply multiple filters:


4

Any list of items with text labels can at least be grouped by first letter. That said, I can't even imagine 1000+ root level categories for movies. Can these categories be curated down to just a few that make sense because how do I even know which category to search for?


3

If I understand you correctly you have videos and you want people to be able to find them easily without them having been put into pre-set categories such as what Netflix does. You haven't given us much information about what kind of videos Hollywood type movies; YouTube cute puppies and guppies; instructional videos - how to use Photoshop, fix your ...


0

I'm not quite sure what you're looking for, and I don't want to just give you a (my) opinion, but here's what I think. I think what people call "search" and what they call "filter" will vary from person to person. Search sounds like the user knows the item or its attributes. Filter sounds like the system presents a list and the user (de-)selects them. ...


0

I had a very similar task to filter a set of data in 6 dimensions. First it is essential to understand the data and the possible filter combinations. Is there some hierarchy, specific order of filters, which may lead to a "lock" of filters? (example: adding filters, then removing a filter "in between"). To give an interactive experience on "building" a ...


0

For this kind of situations, I'd suggest ask yourself the following: is the search a feature or an action? Both concepts are different and lead to very different results. To explain this further: search is a feature if you want it as an aid to find things in your site, yet the search itself means nothing to the logical flow and the site can exist and work ...


3

Put the search input somewhere up top There is an expectation that the most important content you want me to see will be up top. Sometimes I can't always show you only the most important content you are after. For example, every user of a dictionary will place a different value on each entry in the dictionary every time they use it. This is where search ...


0

As usual, the answer is, "It depends...". In this case it depends on the context within which you are performing the search. Since you have the giant blue bar with "All, Fruits, New One, and My List", if you are searching within this context, I'd suggest putting the search box inside the big blue bar - this instantly conveys the context of your search. ...


1

With the surge in mobile/tablet access and the rapid advancements and usage of voice services I would say yes of course. It conveys a smoother user experience and you are always better designing with a forward thinking mind frame


1

There are two common patterns for clearing: explicit clearing, through a button, such as the included button you provided in your captures, or through a stand-alone button for the whole form. This latter solution tends to be a bad practice as users may press it instead of the submit button, and there are few use cases which require a clear form button. ...


3

Clear buttons are normally provided when the field is being used affect a default view and the user is likely to want to return to that default. For example, to filter the list of all products in a catalogue and then to return to the unfiltered list. It's easier and more intuitive to click an explicit 'clear' button than it is to highlight the contents, ...


3

As a front-end developer, I'd make a custom control which shows just the symbol when collapsed and the symbol + text when expanded. This way both concerns (about space and symbol choice) turn less important, because when the dropdown is expanded, it's supposed that the intended action is just to make the selection so you don't care about it taking more or ...


0

Usability is more important than accuracy At least, in most cases. While the ⊂ symbol may be compact and precise, it will be unfamiliar to many lay users so it may not be the most intuitive choice for your search. On the other hand, ff your users are technical, it may be a fantastic choice. Space may be at a premium, but unless you are designing for a ...


0

While other answers have correctly pointed out the symbols for supersets and subsets, if you are ok with mathematical symbols, you might also consider ∊, where x ∊ Y means x is an element of Y. x ⊂ Y means x is a subset of Y, which is, strictly speaking, not exactly correct, as elements of sets have no particular order. Thus, for the expression "ee" ⊂ ...


1

From a UX perspective most of those symbols are problematic with the exception of '='. I'd imagine your users are familiar with '>' or '<' for sure, but even that could be troublesome as some people might need more context. All those others indicating 'contains' etc are definitely not user friendly. If this is only ever going to be in a PC setting within ...


4

The mathematical symbol for "contains" is ⊃. For "starts with" and "ends with", the symbols ^ and $ are used in regular expressions. However, it is unlikely that your users are familiar with these symbols in this context. Use WILDCARDS instead. Most users recognize the use of asterisk * as a placeholder for unknown text during textual-search. This way, ...


0

There is a mathematical symbol for expressing something like 'A has x' and it's the subset symbol: ⊇ and ⊆ or ⊂ and ⊃ (there is clearly some disagreement on how to use it consistent). I highly doubt this symbol is recognized by most users. Maybe use the word 'contains', or if space is really sparse, maybe use the word 'has'? Maybe these links are useful: ...



Top 50 recent answers are included