New answers tagged

0

As adomsoh suggested the column is relevant to you as a user or it is not relevant. Hiding a column is saying "I don't care about this column". To then perform a search on it is inconsistent and confusing. Do you care about it or not? It's confusing because there is nothing visually to correlate between your search query and your results. It can get even ...


1

The search box should be a size that reflects how important it is on the site in question, or how much you think it should be used. If that is too small of a size, let it expand into a usable size when focused. Apple.com has a very small search field, because they probably want users to look around, rather than go directly to the product they were looking ...


5

Primary factors 1. Average length of expected search terms The visible character capacity of the input will influence behavior. In my tests, users will instinctively limit their entry to the available length. This is true even though the input will support typing beyond the field boundary. I've tested slight variations in width where a known norm was ...


3

About 4-5 years ago, I was working on the redesign of AOL Canada's homepage which, at the time, featured a gigantic Google-powered search bar in the header. The search bar was approximately 800 pixels wide, running almost the entire width of the page and it had "Type your search here" written inside the box. This seemed like an overkill to me so I proposed ...


3

Is there a standard size for search boxes? - NO But should we keep a minimum size ? YES Search boxes can be of any size , as long as user can enter the query and perform a search without much hassle. Most commonly used sizes Having said the above , although not a standard Internet giants such as google , Quora , Youtube etc use search box size greater ...


0

I supposed if your search box is able to contain the longest words in English dictionary, (pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis) 45 letters, you should be fine. :) Joke aside, whether a user perform more or less search depends on the context. I would probably do more search in an ecommerce site or faq page as oppose to a portfolio site. As what the ...


28

From my experience, the answer is... It depends! I work for a recipe site and we launched a new site last year which had a whole redesign. We used to have a smaller search box and users interacted with it completely differently to a larger one. Looking at the data that was captured on peoples searching terms, the big change was that when they had a smaller ...


1

I believe that your search input can't be too large, as long as it looks like what users are accustomed to, for example Google search input is 60 characters long. If your search box looks like search box and it is not to narrow everything should work as usual. Anyway it is always a good practice to test it out.


2

So it boils down to whether the search is on the data or just the current view of the data? I'd personally go for 4. Sometime columns are hidden just because of space restriction rather than lack of interest, though obviously the user tends to keep the columns they are most interested in, however as rewobs said often a user will forget what they can't see ...


9

Avoiding the dilemma There's an possible solution without falling into this dilemma: Give users the choice, just by adding a checkbox below the search/filter input which specifies "Search in hidden columns too" or some similar text. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If for some reason that's not enough I'd choose ...


2

I choose (4) at first but after some careful analysis, I think (3) would fit your design better. The reason being that your search itself is already a filtering mechanism (keywords). It doesn't make sense to do further filtering on your results by hiding/showing relevant boxes. Also when I choose to hide a column, I am explicitly indicating that I'm not ...


2

For highly-structured content, like houses and appartments, the approach of leading user towards the desired result is more successfull strategy, compared to free-text search. And it's your task, as an designer, to build the appropriate UI for implementing this strategy. So that the UI will support the "don't-make-me-think" user flow. Let's compare the ...


0

You could also offer: Users who searched for X also viewed Y (NB - not the same as suggesting the other results that closely match the search query) like on Amazon once you have logged what people are searching for, you will be able to use Google key matches to suggest similar search terms


1

The thing about searching for a city is that there may be multiple cities with the same name, or containing the same string. So your search results need to enable the user to distinguish between Salem, Massachusetts, and Salem, Oregon... or between Cambridge, England, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Cambridge, Ontario (if it's international). Some of the ...


2

Ideally you should allow the user to enter what ever makes them comfortable, then you accept it, instead of return an error saying "sorry, please type it only this way." That causes problems, and being very picky about what you want is not the best experience. To settle this between you and your client, you should probably user test. If that's out of ...


2

There are a couple of aspects to this. One is adding a list item, other is editing a list item. If you are adding a list item, once it is added it is saved. Now that item can be searched for. If you are editing, let there be an edit view where the search field will display results for all the editable and non-editable item(s). Prompting to save the ...


4

My opinion is that the text must be saved to be 'part' of searchable data. That is a standard approach. If for some reason, there is a requirement for you to be able to search unsaved text also, then its a different thing. On search focus, you can 'auto save' or 'prompt-save' or just plain ignore the unsaved changes in your search results. But searching ...


1

I'd suggest some similar to Amazon approach: a search bar, which let users constraint the search and then categories. In the categories menu if you can't show them all, you can just an option like "See all categories", which could redirect to a new pages with more options to navegate those categories.



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