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One solution might be to place the search inside of the dropdown, much like how StackExchange does: Currently the part that seems a bit odd in your design is the search is affecting the contents of the dropdown - the problem being that you don't see the affects of your search until you click the dropdown. Then if someone wants to modify the search the ...


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Given the complementary nature of the two functions, I would visually place them next to each other, with a tooltip or some other text hint educating on what result can be expected from each interaction. Don't make the user go in multiple directions to "vote" on a selection. To support a user's ability to undo, I would also explore a global "clear" or ...


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A difference should be made between exact results for auto-completion/filter and inexact. A colleague complained to me that in most cases it is very dificult for him to look for or use/mention his own profile on many sites, because when he has completely typed his name, auto-complete doesn't kick in. His name is Li. One of the most used names around the ...


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It depends on the specific use case, but there is no agreed-upon minimum number of characters that is required before doing filtering. If too many results can get returned, limit the initial set, preferably to the most likely (if that can be determined), or some other metric like most recent. If you use Chrome, go ahead and try it. Enter a single character ...


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Just a note to add to @merqri answer: you may consider a feature, in which user typing a filter string gets information (it can be an approximation), how many results there are. If the number of results is narrowed down to eg. five, you may show them even after two characters. Take a look at MS Excel autocomplete feature: you have some texts (strings) in ...


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Frankly, this is contextual. For a single word, generally 2-4 letters are kept as minimum to initiate the auto complete feature. There are at least two reasons for this. One being the performance as you pointed out. There is no need to fire up a filtering call when you know that the resultant dataset will be huge. Second being, the number of results you ...


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Two modes can be given to the user: Basic and Advanced. Basic mode will cover only All/Any option to join all filters. In Advanced mode, the user can write a complicated query using brackets. Otherwise, putting all options in the given UI will make it a bit complicated, and maybe only few users want to use this Advanced feature.


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Lots of good answers here. I am adding one more. If you are familiar with Microsoft TFS web interface. This is how they currently offer AND/OR based filtering. This also has sub criteria. This only allows one level of cascading. There is a valid reason for that too. Adding more number of levels is overwhelming for the processing logic yielding marginally ...


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My company researched and tested various query representations for more than a decade now, and the one that works best with our users is a funnel-like representation, where OR conditions are laid out horizontally and AND conditions vertically. The AND conditions work like filters in a query in that they make the results set smaller, so we present them that ...


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Is it only me or that the textual option you used is better than any of the graphical suggestions above? In my opinion, this is too complex to be solved solely by some sophisticated graphical arrangement. Now, in this point you have to ask yourself, who is your target user? I guess this is meant for some professional/experienced user, not for a novice one. ...


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If your criteria are mostly simple then a Query By Example (QBE) approach may be sufficient, and simpler for User to learn, construct and debug, especially those users familiar with spreadsheets. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups QBE can scale to more complex terms.


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Have you considered something like a report generation rules wizard similar to outlook inbox rules wizard? The reason I'm suggesting this is: most users may be familiar with this kind of design which would improve user experience the user can change parameters and keep it simple or as complex as they want I agree with @gustav test with users


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The solution is in the interface. Don't make users interpret a tree of inputs. The interface should help the user understand their task. Let the users focus on the filter they are creating. Use form fields, selectors, etc. only as inputs, not to display any information, and remove them once their function is complete. By breaking the statement into ...


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In case of non-techsavvy users, this might be a good way: Whats about making your search criteria like common language. All links are changeable with a dropdown list or similar. Inputfields for numbers or text.


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Groundwork first: To streamline the process and increase efficiency you need to do some groundwork first to address the root issues, search mechanics will follow. You can see the below as either as a three step process or separate work streams that you might need to focus on: 1. Focus on the data: You need to assess the quality of your data as this is ...


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You can choose for fields and take values for each fields instead of fixing the field sequence.


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I don't totally understand the difference between old and new here. I do understand that it's not always acceptable to post visual reference of proprietary systems. Here's a shot in the dark: Providing cues In app cues are critical with this kind of change. Providing some form of contextual help when results fall below a reasonable level will go a long ...


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Users First you need to know who are the users and if this approach fits their needs and skills. For most business users and/or logic is hard to understand and should be avoided. Technicians or clerks in finance, accounting, ... are used to such a logic. UI Depending on the requirements several implementations are conceivable: Simple filter: Implicit ...


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Nested blocks in a vertical layout This pattern tested very well with our users. It uses common language to explain what you are looking for and allows any level of complex grouping where individual blocks can be moved around, changed from AND to OR, or deleted. This level of clarity does take up quite a bit of space but not too much for most simple ...


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I suggest keeping meta data on the type of each tag (i.e. social/primary) and source (i.e. Twitter/Facebook/etc...). This would allow you to weight the value of each tag later and make more informed programmatic searches or analysis.


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Assuming users already entered the filter information before landed on the result page (e.g. most sites like http://www.hotwire.com/ have initial form before hitting the search page), it's unlikely that users will need to tweak the provided info again (look into your metrics if any). However, it is more likely for users to modify secondary filters that are ...



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