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I like tags, which seems to be the most accepted term, but I've also heard it referred to as filtered search.


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Search Token/Tags could be a good general name. But Google came with another one in its Material Design Components: Chips


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I think they have been adopted from "Search Tokens" on OS X. A unit that functions as a special, adjustable search term. Tokens are great because they make searching less error-prone and easier to manipulate. The functionality is different as search tokens refine search to a specific field. However, it looks similar as far as UI is concerned. ...


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Its called as Tagging. Similar to this feature is a available in Mac OS (tagging while saving the files, it helps in searching/indexing files). Many site uses this features as you mentioned. If you follow the patterns in the google, facebook or mac os, you will get the better idea about the tagging guidelines.


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It's usually referred to as 'Multi-select autocomplete' in my experience. I haven't seen any guidelines previously (or from searching now) but this demo and code link might help you in some way jQuery Tokeninput.


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That reminds me of the keyword tagging system from Evernote, at a guess the keywords willl filter your results based upon already defined 'tags'.


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I would argue that sometimes a business doesn't scale its products. K.I.S.S. is a thing. Representing a clear path to finding what you are offering is key. If search does not produce results that beneefit your users - you don't need it. It's a feature for consideration just like any other feature. Test your navigation, test your content, let users tell you ...


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Agree. Yes, you dont know what a user may be looking for. Phone number, careers, return policy, shipping info, contact info? Also search logs help tell you whats important and what you need to more easily surface. You can improve ia and design with search knowledge


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The answer is, YES Because, who knows about the small e-commerce site's feature? It means that the site might grow as soon with lot of products and categories. We have to keep in our mind that even though small retail site or small company sites, it should be very scalable in terms of easily accessible and user experience. Rather than using pagination or ...


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1.If the tree nodes are fixed, not going to increase and its around 100 nodes. Then better to go with just search box ( no need of button).It searches automatically as soon as user types 3 character. If the tree node is gong to increase in future, nodes are around 1000+ then its better to add a button with search box. User will input the search criteria ...


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I guess it depends on your data and the tasks your users have to perform. Without knowing more about your product, I would reccomend searching automatically in subfolders. Search is very seldom done right and from my experience, users resort to search when they cannot visually find the data they are looking for (either because there is too much data on the ...


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A search bar is used by visitors who know what they are looking for. Your landing page is designed for the target audience that isn't aware of the service or product of the website yet. Getting conversions You'll get the most conversions when you use the AIDA formula to draw the attention of the visitors and to engage them with the product or service the ...


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No, don't do it While more information is needed, IN GENERAL the answer would be "NO, don't do it!". Think about this: when you create a landing page, you need to create a funnel to make users perform an action (usually registering or purchasing). The funnel image is not random, think on its shape and you'll realize you're going from general to particular, ...


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The best practice I've used and observed elsewhere is to expose all available filters that are valid for the search, but collapse those that are rarely used. The LinkedIn search is an example of this tactic: I was surprised that BestBuy isn't doing anything in this area. If you provide a query with matches in many different categories, they fully expose ...


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On the subject of moving through large datasets, these two tools may help you build a more efficient UX: https://github.com/cmpolis/smart-table-scroll http://nexts.github.io/Clusterize.js/ Both written by Chris Polis.


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Just a tip, your current example lacks two key aspects of design that all Google Maps implementations should heed to. Difference Remember to use different colours, shapes and styles to represent differing pins on the map. Right now I take it you have granted, refused and not yet decided, but how does one know whether a pin is of one type and not the ...


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Yes, limiting the number of results on the map will simplify the map, however... ...it creates a bias that could influence your user in either a positive or negative way. There are a lot of factors that go into this though and there are two tracks of people I can see when using this map (Explorers and Beeliners). Explorers are going to go around the map, ...


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I agree, that is annoying behavior, as Maciej Sawicki said, you should follow the google convention of searching, meaning clicking the suggestions starts the search but will still be focused on the input screen so you can continue typing. That way you can start evaluating if the search already has something usefull or just keep typing as you were. Also, try ...


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This answer is nearly a duplicate of a question answered earlier today, but I don't know how to close and redirect your question. Keep the search button for the search box For a long time, now, these have been the Nielssen Norman Group's published guidelines (available for purchase, not free). They sum up as follows: Have an easily identifiable ...


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There are some really good answers here, but I wanted to contribute something from a slightly different perspective... time. If you're purely using filters to limit results, then the most common expectation is that the list being filtered is 'live' and values may change at a regular interval, just as they would if the list weren't being filtered. On the ...


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If you are dealing with users who are in this application regularly, using this feature every day, you might consider an advanced query builder. Imagine one text input field where you can type not only the filter terms, but the filter categories. So, if I type sub + tab + Jan 2, the filter Submission Date: January 2, 2015 is automatically applied. ...


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Yes, Nielsen Norman Group have reported on the research. Here's a summary. Yes, provide a search button for the search box For a long time, these were the unchanging research-based published guidelines (available for purchase, not free): Have an easily identifiable search box in the upper right-hand corner of the page, with an open-text field ...


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The answer to your first question as to whether there should be a single tag search or multiple - you are 100% right, there should be a single search (there are some edge cases where you may need multiple, however in 98% of cases - you want single search). As nightning mentioned, website visitors most likely have no context of your website hierarchy and in ...


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Before making users filter/facet down the results you could let them filter down the search itself, like this (screenshot taken at LinkedIn):


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We faced a similar problem and took a hint from "Spotlight" design. You can see how the search results have been categorized based on Metadata. I think you can show it in a similar way using Sunspot. We achieved a similar result using Sphinx. We had a usability testing done with this kind of categorized search UI as against returning results in the ...


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Why not try a hybrid approach where you provide a button, but it's size and position is secondary to the user interacting with the recommended results? Take a look at the search interaction on HomeDepot.com: I've worked on sites with similar interactions and have seen solid proof in the usage data that these types of search interfaces are effective. ...


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We have had a similar problem to resolve. The way we have done it is as suggested by @pierre move the search to the top. The problem is that if we have "Search In" options initially in the deselected state then semantically it is inconsistent because if the users initiate a search without any selection then it is going to be run across all the fields (much ...


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Users are already used to conventions created by Google search. Sticking to this conventions is always the right choice. See what Google does: Clicking autocomplete triggers the search after clicking suggestion... ...but doesn't empty the search input field afterwards, so that user can edit it, filter or click advanced search


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The UX question is about interface design. Knowing what your minimum, maximum and average results are is essential to create the right design. The reason I'm asking is that it's a question that comes up again and again in my system design so maybe others will have had the same. I think the real answer to your question has nothing to do with post codes ...


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If you're referring to the UK postcode areas, then according to https://www.mjt.me.uk/posts/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-addresses/ Warwick University has a single postcode of CV4 7AL which refers to 6,000 students. It also gives a French postcode of 75015, referring to 230,000 people. Forces' BFPO numbers are a single postcode, so a single aircraft ...


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The postal code in the USA with the largest number of people in it is the one for El Paso, which has a little over 114,000 residents in a single code. There may be more in some other countries as postal codes vary from a single code for an entire city (e.g. South Africa) to a single post code for one or two streets (e.g. the Netherlands). Relying on a ...


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Can you specify the geographic region your application based for. Otherwise the answer for your question would be varied. I can give an example for Singapore, where postcode are actually tagged to a building, but for bigger countries it would be much bigger. Also you can explore designs that can vary based on pre- assumed numbers, like with smaller number ...


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Assuming that every city has a single post code and that in the extreme case every individual has its own address, we need to look at how large cities are in terms of population. The biggest city in the world is Shanghai with an estimated population of roughly 25.000.000 people. Mind that not all births may be registered correctly and take into account that ...


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Yes, it looks strange It's strange because it's non-standard. You could move the Search box from your mega-menu to the standard location. Here's a list of interesting articles from the Nielsen Norman Group. It can help you decide where to put the Search box, and how to format it, for best user performance. In particular, here's a quote from this article ...


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This is a very difficult task no doubt and I would agree most schools don't do a great job at presenting all of these options for a student to choose. More the less to do this on a website is a very big task. Here's my thought degrees vs majors doesn't really matter as much. You can do either one. What would help us make buckets to lump similar things ...


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Here's an example from the requirements team: 'The biggest number of addresses under one postcode that I've ever seen is 2000' Another example from one of our SMEs: 'Many members of the armed forces will give their barracks as their address. So one barrack, with one postcode, will have hundreds of individuals associated with it'


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It's either one or the other. Search functionality should be consistent foremost. So you actually have 2 possibilities: searching for "file.png" will show exact matches only: file.png searching for "file.png" will show anything close enough: file.png anything containing "png" anything containing "file" The exact rules in the 2nd option can vary. ...


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What I normally do for my search functions is do ALL of them, just put the more relevant and specific results first, for example. User search: CAR: Results: Car Car Parts Car Tires Tire Care .. Carrots Or if you want to signify to the user the point where you took a bit of abstraction you could just seperate the list like so: Results: Car Car ...


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You can give search list according to the category selected by the user but in the search field if the user types for a product name there you can suggest products of same name in different category. So the user will get an idea about the product even if they don't know the exact category of the product.


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Use Search and Filter Let your main search to be available always to perform a search in all categories. Once user chooses a category from the shop by drop down. Provide him the products which you think what he is looking for according to your analytics. Now allow him to filter on the selected shop by/category. Search Let the search hang there when ever ...


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Since you are asking about the position of the search box in question I would suggest moving it to the top of the screen. It seems that this location has become the default. You can see this in for example the default email app in Android, while the button for searching your emails in the buttom, the input itself goes to the top. While your application has ...


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I'd suggest not have the search bar next to the keyboard for the following reasons: It starts to resemble the iOS text messaging interface which may cause confusion with some users Are you expecting users to need to search for keywords that often that it needs a persistent search bar? I'd recommend having a read of the iOS Human Interface Guidelines, ...


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No, it shouldn't. The query action is on the search button, what you're editing is the query string performed by that action, so without performing that action again, nothing happens, and nothing should happen, this is the correct behavior. Furthermore, the affordance for the url bar is that nothing happens unless you perform an action, otherwise you'd get ...



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