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It's good to bring people back to where they were before they started a task. This means the homescreen (task = make phone call), and the search screen (task = call a specific person) are good end positions. You can argue that going to the recent calls makes it easy to re-dial in case you forgot something. However, that phone number should also be listed in ...


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The beauty of a single search field is that it works like Google... You just type in all the keywords you care about and Google takes care of the rest for you. However the devil is in the details. In order to make one field work, your backend search needs to search for each keyword (delimited by white space) across all columns of data (I'm assuming a SQL ...


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Pros: A single box is, well, simpler. It also eats far less space on your UI, and only seeing one box to search in is far less daunting. Imagine opening Google and finding instead of the search bar, individual fields for Page Title, Description, Site, Date, etc. Yikes. Cons: Ambiguity of search. If I want to search for Alan Smith, chances are a single ...


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What you are describing is essentially different facets of the same products. Search best practice suggests you use find as you type search ( single input). There is actually a number of patterns within this category with varying levels of difficulty in terms of implementation.The example below uses an auto-complete approach. "Designing Search: As-You-Type ...


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You could rather use a single text field for equipment name that intelligently drops a suggestion box in case the user inputs a specific equipment type and/or model name/number. Let's say your equipment model numbers start with XT, then as the user starts typing "XT" in the textbox, suggestions would start dropping down. Otherwise, the search box would ...


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I would use tabs. UI guidelines for using tabs stipulate that they present different views of the same information. so put the type and model search on the first tab, and the search by name search on the second tab. (Side note: Have a look at the Auto Trader website and the way they implement searches for different types of cars - I found it very easy and ...


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Most sites don't work as you propose, because it would be confusing. Users expect a keyword in the search bar to start a new search, as you note. Google Trends is providing an interface that allows multiple different searches to be entered and compared. This justifies the more complicated design. It wouldn't really make sense as a design for ...


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So I'm working on a project that is doing something similar, but we might be using the dropdown differently than you are. We start off by defaulting to a "global search", that is we search across all our various categories in our dataset. If you'd like to refine your initial search to a specific category, the dropdown provides that functionality. We also ...


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If you're going to use a dropdown menu as part of your search bar, try looking and gmail and the way they do it for greater clarity and maybe a solution for on mobile. My gut would say to have a feature – the dropdown, inside the search bar once its tapped for a more detailed search if a regular search just wont surfice.


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This question has 2 dimensions: one of them totally off topic (the implementation side) and the other being the UX side. Luckily, even the implementation side has been covered by Wojciech's answer. As for the UX part: technically, it can be done. But the question is: why would you want to do this? See, the idea of searching is to display results based on ...


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Not actually an UX question... Your devs are half-wrong, since sorting & pagination might be actually performed by DB. When using LINQ, for example the following expression: var persons = (from p in container.Persons where p.Age >= 18 && p.Sex == Sex.Female orderby p.Distance ascending select p) ...


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Really, it has nothing to do with whether it's required or not. The nature of a select box is that something is always selected, whether that be a placeholder (which is still just an option like any other) or one of the actual available options. Given that, the only acceptable time to exclude a placeholder is when there is a valid default option for the ...


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If the field is required, it should not be auto-filled, because Fields with stuff in them are less noticeable. Eyetracking studies show that users’ eyes are drawn to empty fields. At the minimum, users will spend more time locating a non-empty field — a nuisance. At the worst, they will overlook the field completely—a potential ...


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There's a bit of difference in the problems they're there to solve. Find As another responder has already said, search-within-document (ctrl-F) is typically referred to as "find". This is usually used where you know (or suspect) that the exact text you're looking for is in the document, and wish to confirm it's presence and locate it. You're looking ...


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Search is different in these contexts, because in an editor, the user has created the content, knows it well, and finds it easiest to locate a piece by viewing results in the order they occur. You may notice in some document viewers (e.g. PDF, rather than editors) where the user is reading someone else's content and is less familiar, the trend may be ...


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Here is your solution as per my point of view. See the image below.


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One design options you can look into is using a dropdown call-to-action for your search button. So by default you can present the input elements for one type of search, and when the user selects the other search type you present them with the alternate set of input elements. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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Use a tabbed container for the filters A common and acceptable way to separate filter options, is to user tabs (or versions of tabs) This can often be seen on travel websites, where users can search for several different services. With this method, it's only possible to submit one set of search criteria at one time. Put each set of filters in an ...


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The question as to whether diacritics should be ignored in search functions will probably get down to personal preference/opinion. However, you may find the following useful: http://cognitiveseo.com/blog/6773/the-diacritics-seo-technique-a-tactic-nobody-is-using/ https://moz.com/blog/so-you-want-to-know-about-foreign-language-seo-mozinar-q-a Note: I have ...



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