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1

It's quite common for previous searches to appear in a drop down list below the search boxes as soon as focus goes into the box - or even for a dedicated search page, simply to automatically show the saved or recent searches in a list without having to manually make that happen. This then allows the previous searches to be sensibly filtered or ordered as ...


1

I don't like the icon. Usually the diskette is the symbol for saving something, not displaying a list. Since you have a lot of space why don't you use a button with label "Saved Searches ...", just below the "Search" button. See image below : EDIT by OP in other parts of the app is an icon that allows you to access the saved search list


1

I have implemented a similar stuff using Solr and the approach is to drive the search by 'keywords' and add more filters based on user request. If your search engine supports faceted search your search query would be q=searchTerm&fq1=filter1&fq2=filter2 etc., Here is the pen - http://codepen.io/balajinatarajan/pen/ezyal


1

Multi-field search boxes are not the end of the world and yes Google and other major search engines do have the horsepower to distinguish and muddle through what the user wants vs. what the user typed but this might not be the current case with this implementation. Your opinion: But I am of the opinion that the search engine's algorithm must be terrible ...


0

This seems more like a development question than it is UX. The limitations of datatable you described are specific to that library, not UX. The "thought you had" is exactly what datatable offers on the demo on their website. If it has the limitation you described, you are probably looking for a different library, rather than trying to solve a UX problem. ...


0

Don't change the word in the input field, because then there will be a cognitive disconnect. What you should do, however, is show the results below and list them in terms of relevance like so: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Or, what you could do is also have a smart search where it will suggest words. That way ...


0

Generally, don't make assumptions on a user's intentions when performing a search (or anything else). If a user is looking for multiple 'cats' don't assume that a single 'cat' is good enough to quench the user's lust for feline shenanigans. There are also a great deal of plurals that would be very difficult for you to adjust to - 'goose' vs. 'geese', for ...


0

With huge trees like the one you mentioned, no matter how you display it, it will be very difficult to find what you are looking for even in a filtered tree. I have encountered similar issues (10s of thousands of nodes and more than a million leaves) and in the end we decided that for large trees, filtering does not make sense from a UI perspective. ...


2

Here is my implementation of a solution. (watch video) I'm not arguing as much as Evil Closet Monkey did and I will certainly tell again many things he already told, but it should probably look like this if it was an iOS app with modern/flat design. At beginning, only the search field is shown, no ambiguity. When the field is filled, the second shows ...


0

Seeing as this is a UX form, it would really help knowing what the user needs are. That is, what is the nature of the nodes, and what will users try/need to do with them and why. Also, is there any additional data users may be able to filter nodes by, and is it a single level hierarchy or an unlimited one (Can A have an A child that has an A child and so on ...


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You question was not clear enough for me. I will reply it as much as I can. I believe that in this case, applying a couple of approach together is the most usable. I do that in banking systems and get positive reactions when finding complex products / transactions etc... I would use the combination of those three autocomplete text area: It is important ...


0

Currently I'm in a similar situation. We both agree digging through the tree doesn't work. Does the end-user have a mental model of tree in mind when they think about the navigation? What about fuzzy searching? This what a proposed to a developer today. When you type in a input-field the system will recognize the pattern and show the correct ...


1

Well, you can still have one button that says "Proceed". So a label must be placed somewhere saying that if you complete only one textbox a search will be performed and if both textboxes are completed then a comparison will take place.


0

Keep your search function separate from your compare function. The user may want to use the compare field for search, but they would be wrong in doing so, therefore do not allow them to. If you put the search button/text field in a different place, and call attention to it as a search feature, your users should not be confused at all.


8

You buttons should always say what they do. Avoid vague terms and, most especially, do not confuse the user by having a single button do two things! Also, giving the user two text fields can cause issue - if I only type something into the second box, what happens? UX Movement has an article on naming buttons: Why Your Form Buttons Should Never Say 'Submit'. ...


1

This suggestion is probably a bit unconventional. But well, at least I had fun making it. edit: Sorry @JonW. Didn't know that. I will elaborate below and look into the mockup-tool, it looks nice. So what I did, is to make the button interactive. When the user wants to search, he just fills in Product A en clicks the button 'Search'. But when the user wants ...


1

The ability to select tags and perform a search could simply be called: Tag based search. This is a form of faceted search (which you have already tagged in your post!) http://alistapart.com/article/design-patterns-faceted-navigation This opens up a bunch of other questions including: are the tags user defined? or are you working within a fixed taxonomy of ...


1

Try to avoid different modes for the same button. A call-to-action should perform the same action each time and should not change its behaviour at all. Rather use two different buttons. You could enable/disable the buttons depending on the user input, but don't forget to add a hint why they're disabled then. E.g. "Please select two products to compare" ...


8

The Google home page is simple and uncluttered. But, once you search for something - you can filter: Are we missing something - or are you?


2

Google does have filters. On my mobile version, there's a list of links at the top. The right-most says "More" and the bottom link in the drop-down list is "Search tools." That provides filtering by date, and whether you've visited the page, etc. (This is Google mobile, on Android.) Here's what I see on my Android: ...and then, click on "Search ...


3

I associate "search" with a more open-ended query, almost always involving a text box input (though not necessarily keyword search). The process you're describing I think is more "filtering". I would use a filter icon (a funnel) as opposed to a search icon (magnifying glass). I also really like "Show Matching ...". Definitely not "Find", though, as that ...


2

Maybe the button could say, "Show All," before any options are selected, (or if no options are selected, if that's a possibility.) Then when an option is changed, change the button label to say something like, "Show Matching Records." I think the, "Show Matching," label is appropriate in this case, because your users are trying to match the selected ...


0

Search Disable (gray) the Search when the execute When they change an option or clear then Enable Search


2

You could switch the process and show the results for the phrase the user actually searched for first. Without making assumptions what the user might have searched. This way the user will be more likely to click on a provided link to a similar phrase if the result is obviously not living up to her expectations.


0

'That being the case how do ask the customer "did you mean what you wrote"?' An example like this?


0

Like others already said - go with "Search". It's a most common word pattern used in most interfaces since ages.


0

I would highly recommend using the word "Search" as it is the convention most common on internet and desktop applications. In specific instances you may want to break the convention/expectation, but there should be a good reason. (For example, perhaps this is an application for a specific set of users like Librarians and the word "Search" is already strongly ...


4

'Search' is universally associated with the functionality you've described above. When the user comes to the page, the button takes secondary importance as you need the user to do some filtering/ selections first. In this case, you can keep the button greyed out till all required selections have been made. 'Update results' would be a good choice if the ...



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