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87

I have a personal hatred towards websites which clear content from the Search bar after I hit Search. Here's why: It is completely unnecessary to clear the content out. There are multiple chances that the user might want to add something to that query. For example, if I search for American Psycho and I find that it's a movie with amazing ratings and I ...


58

If you clear the box, you're taking away control from the user. While you may seem like you're doing them a favor, you're robbing them of context for what they just typed in. When you type things into a command prompt, the previous command you typed is still there. Although you state that it's a long ID that the user probably just pasted in have you ...


4

You can also provide a separate clear search or reset sort of a feature in your search bar's input box. By which you are not taking the control from the users and also you give them an option to perform the task.


4

If you're torn between these two, I'd go with convention: your first design uses radio buttons to communicate that the values are mutually exclusive. The UI elements in the first design clearly show the user that they can only choose one of them. I would imagine with your second design, a user would use it the first time and think "oh, these other fields ...


3

Both ways are frustrating as the user must pay careful attention either to the specific search box or the selected radio button. Search box should be single and simple. The fact that the searches are mutually exclusive does not necessarily means the user should be limited to search a single field at a time. Searching 'London' for example, he may want to ...


3

I would prefer the first design in a different way. As the user should search for one particular field at a time it's better to have a drop-down in front of the search field, the user knows it is mandatory to choose one from the drop-down and they can also see the options they opt to search from the drop-down menu. It also consumes less space for the search ...


2

Search box are essentiall just input fields that serve a special purpose. Input fields usually keep their input, unless the user deletes it himself. Making an input simply disappear without an explicit "delete" option would be bad, since it takes control from the user and it contradicts with standard input field behaviour. But you don't even need a delete ...


2

A Single search box, intelligent enough powered by programming obviously, which will provide results based on search query. In first approach Design One we are expecting users have carefully selected the option among Town / Street / Property Design Two It seems a 'Sequential' flow. Ohh..i have to enter Town first then Street then Property?..ok..But ...


1

I would recommend implementing an autofilter search box with match-highlighting and checkboxes for directory/database filters: You could have the filter automatically update the list of contacts displayed in case someone typed a name and forgot to select a directory or selected the wrong directory. It will prevent them from having to redo the name entry ...


1

If your user turns off instant search or you do not offer it, the user will expect the search results to not change until they submit the search form again. I would therefore prefer not to change the style or content of the search results page. Also: The user who edited the search string will (likely) be aware of the discrepancy with the search results ...


1

A simple way would be to alter the framing of the input box, i.e. thick lines for "changed" text, thin lines for "old" text after searching. Another idea: Add "Search results for ..." between the input box and the results. That makes it clear even for printed and saved pages.



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