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4

Don't do it There are several reasons: Pull-to-refresh is a very common mobile UX idiom. You are asking users to unlearn the idiom and learn some other behavior in its place, which is going to feel unintuitive at best and annoying at worst. You are asking the user to slide vertically to delete horizontally, which is going to feel very weird since there ...


2

That wouldn't be advisable. Take a simple interface... ... and now close the keyboard (something many keyboards can do, through a direct button press or other user action)... ... now what? It is not appropriate to allow the user to reach a state where they have to figure out what to do. In the above situation they have to tap back into the search ...


2

To give you a concrete example: have a look at Command-T which certainly solves the first of your problems and does use such a dialog (displaying a list of files). It targets developers working with rather large trees of code files, just like the Visual Studio plugin you mentioned. Its core algorithm is based on subsequence matching which is pretty useful ...


2

The mathematical symbol for "contains" is ⊃. For "starts with" and "ends with", the symbols ^ and $ are used in regular expressions. However, it is unlikely that your users are familiar with these symbols in this context. Use WILDCARDS instead. Most users recognize the use of asterisk * as a placeholder for unknown text during textual-search. This way, ...


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From a UX perspective most of those symbols are problematic with the exception of '='. I'd imagine your users are familiar with '>' or '<' for sure, but even that could be troublesome as some people might need more context. All those others indicating 'contains' etc are definitely not user friendly. If this is only ever going to be in a PC setting within ...


1

I don't think deleting letter by letter is a good thing : User doesn't want to pull for 10s if he wrote a long word/sentence. Besides, the idea to coming back few step backward by deleting some characters in the search is nice, just do it according to the size or syllabe by syllabe. EDIT : Don't forget to add a simple visual content to make the gesture is ...


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Yes, it's called page citation notation. The notation is based on formal text citations. For example, the ASA Lite and APA Reference standards use notations where page ranges are denoted by hyphens (e.g. 100-113) and multiple pages/ranges are separated by commas (e.g. 1, 5, 23-45). From the APA guidelines: Give inclusive numbers for articles or sections ...


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I'd put them at the right if you must choose. Unless you really need to filter your data to make sense of it, I'd tuck it out of the left-gutter view most people scan with. I've also has some really interesting usability sessions that suggest filters/search are confusing for non-techy people whom may rather just scroll. This all depends on the size of your ...


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If the table is the only element displayed on the page, filters should be in a right or left column. and for tablet/mobile, just above the page title.



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