Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

There is a question you need to answer (which can be stated in different ways): How big is your dataset? Is "everything" a finite set? Is it sensible that the user might want to see everything? If your dataset is small or finite, or it's sensible that the user would be able to deal with everything, then you could return everything. If your dataset is ...


15

I vote for option #4. A search from the main page should show mostly videos and a few pictures to hint to the user that there may be more content types on the site than they realize. If they're searching from a picture page, show mostly pictures but a few related videos as well. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


14

No. The amount of results per page should depend on: The display size of each result - the smaller the result the more you should show per page e.g. from small to large: thumbnail, one line, multi line, large image, ... The window size - the larger the user's window is (or device's screen if in fullscreen mode) the more results you should show. Showing 10 ...


12

Things are given numbers largely for two reasons: so that they can be referred to or so that they can be counted. In short, the reason Google (and all other major search engines) don't number individual entries is that it's largely meaningless extraneous information. Part of the interest of the first style of numbering system is that the thing the number ...


12

There are two psychological key aspects that are in play when it comes to this matter. Users want to feel as they are in control Users (people) want the ability to choose The I'm feeling lucky feature does not cater to either of these aspects. It is true that the user and the SEO will agree on the most suiting search result on a majority of the time. ...


12

TL;DR: Use a multi factor ranking system. A good example to follow is the way that Google rank search results. We of course don't know the precise details of their ranking algorithm, but they have arguably done the most research on this and have the most success. What we do know for sure is that Google include a large number of factors and apply a ...


11

Taking the user straight to the 'single result' page could be detrimental in several ways in my opinion - not least of all it feels like the search isn't very powerful or adaptable. What are the chances that the user only wants to see one result. Its Hobson's choice - but people like to feel that they have a choice. If there is one result, then it's a ...


11

I did a quick check on how Google and Bing handle this and their flow is to just ignore the search request if there is no search value entered and keep the user in the same page. While that does make sense since the user might be confused if search results are contrary to what he expected and if he gets some random results he might be confused as in his ...


8

We can use common sense to answer this question. Let's say you put pagination on the top of your SERP and it has 6 results, only 3 of which fit above the fold. This is the first SERP page: ________________ | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 | | | | Result 1 | | Result 2 | | Result 3 | ----------------- . Result 4 . . Result 5 . . Result ...


8

It's generally accepted that most searches are for navigation purposes, rather than discovering content; here's some recent data by Google on this. One key factor here is whether the user already knows that there is only one relevant endpoint. For example, if users search for a Ticket ID in a defect tracker like Apache Bloodhound, they likely already know ...


8

This sounds like a composite of two patterns. It's not a hybrid, borrowing some aspects from autocomplete and some from federated search; it's nothing more or less than auto-complete and federated search used together. Therefore I think your calling out the existing patterns is preferable to using a unique name, even if someone has already coined one. ...


7

My point: Don't use two different ways, it might be confusing for users why one time they got a result page, another time a hotel profile page. Autosuggest: Maybe autosuggest (like OS X Spotlight or Facebook search) might be a good idea: first 3-6 elements are hotels, selecting any of these brings you to the hotel profile page. The last list item should be ...


7

In your situation, a user will just copy the full model name from the printer properties dialog in Windows, to the search input field. So if it doesn't match, the user won't try to remove the model name and search again. Also, it might not be clear to him what exactly he should type into the search field. I think it would be better to make a separate field ...


7

You can use a Search Thesaurus, which basically is predefined synonymes stored in your search engine. So if the user search for programmer, your thesaurus should translate this to search for "developers" and "coders" as well. The real problem here is to find out which terms your target audience use. The best option here is to look through your search ...


7

Are the images themselves of any value? - placeholder or actual. If you're dealing with a mixed-case of images and missing images, why not design for the most common denominator? Likewise from a design perspective, you're putting heavy emphasis on the image scale and placement itself - are most users more familiar with the image or title of entity? I'd ...


6

You might not be Google, but the fundamental principles of search remain the same: users are looking for a specific piece of information, and want to find it as quickly as possible. Due to the relevance in search results delivered by the market leading search engines, users expect to get the result they are looking for on the first page of results and will ...


6

Informing users what's going on is never wrong. Assuming that we’re within time limit (<100 ms) and do not need to do anything is always wrong. How can you tell how long it takes for user X to download content Y from your site Z at any given moment? There must be at least 200 unknown variables here that you do not have control over. That’s the reason we ...


6

I am pretty sure that the delay is due to the fact that since the flight information must be up to date both price-wise and availability-wise and not based on a cached database, as web search engines do, the server must contact multiple external services - those of all the flight companies to get up to date info, thus the delay. I am sure they appreciate ...


5

I totally get the "put the business needs first" idea and I'm behind it -- but Obviously, if customers never see any ads, then the business can't make any revinue, and eventually lose the incentive or ability to offer value. In the very same way; if the customer can't find the content they were looking for; the site stops providing them with value, and ...


5

I'm not sure you need to complicate the results with an in-line revision history (even if it's only showing now and then), but you can indicate that the search result is something that was only in use during a certain time period so that you can determine its relevance. Since only the older version shows the search term, I think that's the only version you ...


5

The obvious issue with the 'I'm Feeling Lucky' button is that it doesn't do anything useful. (ie it doesn't provide any information that you can't get by pressing 'Return' - which is always easier than having to pick the mouse up and press on a button) If Google were to remove it one day, I'd be surprised if anyone noticed.


5

Moving to more human-like computer system, you could give to the system some human features: Politeness -- don't make use blame himself of his error (this effect is described by D.Norman in The Design of Everyday Things). Just point it gently. Forgiveness -- both computers and humans make errors. Forgive the user and he will forgive the system's error ...


5

This possibly sounds like a good use case for categorised autocomplete - http://jqueryui.com/autocomplete/#categories A single search box that splits the result into logical grouping when presented back to the user. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Hope this helps.


5

I don't think that there is a standard. But I like the idea of following principles of how people interact with each other and reflecting that in UI design. Sending a search request can be looked at as asking a person a question. You formulate a question and then make sure that the person hears and understands it. If you request a response without a question ...


5

I think we have to be honest with users. So return NOTHING, but not just nothing! Users have nothing to do while seeing NOTHING in the search result. Another idea is to show them why there is nothing ? Maybe they are not searching in the right place. Maybe a word is misspelled so we can correct it. Finally, maybe we are not supposed to have such contents!


5

My answer would depend on the website you are designing/building for. For example, if you were developing an estate agents, I think there's mileage in displaying the search box at the top of the page with: "No search term entered, here are our latest properties" Then list 20 or so properties that have been entered in the database. The same principle ...


4

I really think that these day's (in the tablet era) people are really used to the combined box it also spares space on your UI and the more uncluttered Ui you have, the better. Here is a way how you can do this. Hope this helps.


4

It's a selling point. By showing that the search results were acquired in a short amount of time, they're advertising the speed and efficiency of their search algorithm. This doesn't really affect the majority of users in a meaningful way, but from a UX perspective, they choose to show this off because it enhance (in a subtle way) the trust factor inherent ...


4

My rule of thumb: If redundancy makes things easier and doesn't confuse the user, it's fine. If it confuses the issue, then it's best to leave alone. In this specific case, a search bar atop a search results page tends to be a web standard and can keep the user focused in the area of the page where the results are, even as they modify the search. Verdict: I ...


4

If the user's attention is on the body of the page, it makes sense to offer "next step" options where the person is looking, rather than having to scan the entire page to find the search box or other pertinent control. This is particularly useful if the user is not familiar with the web page. Perhaps you can instrument the system to see which control ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible