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2

It's a bit assumptive that it would matter for all UX design, but when designing for web specifically any property relying on search traffic, it doesn't matter whether the fold is a myth or not. It matters to Google. We have to be attentive to how it loads and how our pages perform. Google's Page Speed Insights have many recommendations towards streamlining ...


1

Draggable objects on mobile devices are object represented with a handle. In iOS apps it is commonly done similar to the Reminders app, with the icon on the right. Instead of the "scroll area" you may consider a "drag area", or better yet a drag icon that only activates the drag feature when pressed and held. The user could scroll without concern and they ...


11

The history of the term "Above the fold" comes from newspapers where the articles at the top were most visible when the newspaper was folded. To quote this Wikipedia article Above the fold is the upper half of the front page of a newspaper where an important news story or photograph is often located. Papers are often displayed to customers folded so ...


48

It comes from newspapers which are folded in half. Above the fold refers to content that is visible without unfolding or turning the newspaper over to see the 2nd half. This term was adapted to websites and their content that is visible without scrolling. Here is a picture of a newspaper. Everything you can see is above the fold.


71

It's from print newspapers; back in the day when broadsheets were more common, they were usually presented folded in half vertically, so the most important part of the front page was the portion "above the fold", which is the first thing most people see when they see the newspaper. Analogously, this is the first part of the website you see when a page loads, ...


0

The Apple demo just shows me three and a half phones, nothing else. I cannot even scroll the page. Now you might call me a special case because I use a portrait monitor and use Vimperator instead of a mouse. But I know of quite a few users who use screen readers and other non-conventional input and output devices. If you can assume that 100% of you users ...


14

This design loses all novelty the instant you realize it's a slideshow. However, as a slideshow, it wins in these areas: having a single direction to swipe/scroll makes it easier to figure out "where do I go from here" than something like Prezi (where the "next" direction can be anywhere, even into/out of the page) a smooth transition from one page to the ...


1

I wanted to post this as a comment on andrewb's answer, but I ran out of room. andrewb gave a number of good points about these websites. The problem is that ALL of these good points can be applied to a non-full-screen scrolling page WITHOUT the downsides dan1111 pointed out, and often even better. A scrolling page allows you fine control over what a user ...


5

dan1111 has pointed out potential issues with this design, but I think that it's quite a robust idea if executed correctly. Case example is the Mac Pro introductory website. This garnered a lot of attention when it came out, providing a good way to introduce users to the new product. Things they did well: 1. It looks great Black backing, appropriate font ...


2

These single page apps were in trend which led the way to a few frameworks with which the similar view can be achieved in a better way. The point is the user has to use a loads of scroll either to go to top (unless the link to top is provided) or to scroll to the bottom and they might be clueless about the category they are going through except to say ...


48

The visual appeal of those sites is undeniable. However, they have serious problems in terms of usability: All control is taken away from the user. All of these sites force everyone to view a multi-page glossy ad, whether they want to or not. What if I just want to buy your product? What if I want to quickly get your contact information? Forget about ...



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