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1

Yes there are alternatives Since you only have two views, a common approach that is also applicable to Material Design is to provide a toggle icon or word (map or list) in the topbar. This avoids the need to take up valuable real estate with a tab control, and may help you avoid the awkward scrolling design by enabling a fixed topbar. This approach is ...


0

Start by questioning the design requirements, for example: - What is the intended purpose of the documentation page? - What is the desired outcome. I think having back to the top button only masks information architecture issues and lays the burden of dealing with complex content on the user. A more structural solution would be to focus on ...


6

Both work, but it's more important to make sure that the top of the page is visually clear Let's look at what happens when the user hits the home or scroll to top button: The screen changes (either by scrolling or by jump). This is going to be cognitively disruptive for long documents, whether you scroll or jump: the user will still be confronted with a ...


6

This is not about fancy "cinematic effects" or decoration. The animation actually serves the purpose of telling the user, that he or she is returning to a previous section of the document, thereby counteracting attention blindness and preventing confusion, especially in the case of the user accidentally clicking the back to top button. So yes, animate.


0

It is a good question. If the size or length of the page is very long then don't use immediate transition from bottom to top. Instead provide page breakups like jump to title1, title2 etc. If the length of page is not really long then you can go with the transition but some subtle animation. It should be immediate change for a user.


0

Never use an abrupt change on the layout. Instead, use a transition to avoid confusing the user in case of accidentally touching the "scroll to top" button. And same goes for any other action performed on your page/app: some mild transition helps the user understand there's a change in what he was seeing. Now, for long documentation pages, instead of a ...


0

The Home key gets you to the top of the page. The only time I've found a "Go to top" button useful is on infinitely scrolling web pages where some cleanup is done when you click the button. If you do implement it, have it collect some stats, see how many people actually use it. I would be surprised if many do. Jump vs Scroll A smooth scroll can provide a ...


0

After the blog article text would be a suitable placement. I see absoultely no reason why a user would commit to sharing an article without reading it first. It's like watching the opening credits to a film, pausing it - then asking the audience to write a review. Intersecting the content flow would, in my opinion, further reduce the chance for the user to ...


1

Rather than detracting from the reading experience, could you have a prompt for sharing either on the left or right of the article? I'm not a fan of this approach as it can have issues for the UI, especially in JS disabled environs etc. however it keeps the article free from clutter, doesn't interrupt the reading process and allows sharing from any where in ...


10

As a corollary to both @tohster and @Matt Obee's very nice answers, there is an additional consideration: Tickers remove control from the person viewing the information Someone who is trying to read content that is presented as a static list can scroll up or down at their own leisure, and are actively engaged in that act. Tickers force whoever is viewing ...


1

The reason why it's not a good ux design element is because it makes a webpage look like a financial TV channel. People see that sliding text and it links to their visual association of NEWS! READ ME! LOOK HERE!! NEWS! Etc. Arhhh, get me outta here! It's been done to death - so much so, that people will automatically click away after a second seeing it ...


4

Personal opinion: Tickers are good, as stated above, when the amount of space you have is defined (eg the ticker on a TV news channel). It's good because you can read a summary of the news quickly, as the TV presenter is going through a news story in detail. It also has the advantage that, because it's (usually) with the sound on, you can read the ticker and ...


17

Scrolling text can be a barrier to accessibility, so much so that WCAG requires that you provide a control that allows the user to pause, stop, or hide the moving content (SC 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide). Content that moves or auto-updates can be a barrier to anyone who has trouble reading stationary text quickly as well as anyone who has trouble ...


122

Tickers are like carousels, but worse. Since you're asking for disadvantages, tickers are an antipattern because: The content is unpredictable for users. Users don't know how large the content is, what order it appears in, where it starts or ends, and how long it will take to read all of it. It either scrolls too slow or too fast. If a reader is focused ...


1

Tickers are good for times where you have very limited vertical space (multiple tickers on some TV channels) or very limited space in general (back of a police car, like the previous answer). However, tickers have one big drawback - they dictate the reading speed. Someone who reads fast has to wait for the ticker to display the new word and someone who ...


41

This is just my opinion, but it's an answer. Tickers, or marquees, where you see them, tend to inhabit small spaces. Whether that's across the front of a cinema, the back of a police car or on a train station sign. In the real world they offer an advantage in that they can display more information than the display can statically display, but in a smaller, ...


0

It depends on how important the text is that the user is reading. If it's just information the user might need... maybe entered information would be a better description, then the accept button should ALWAYS be displayed. However, if there's some critical warning or license agreement the user must acknowledge then the user should be forced to scroll ...



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