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128

Tickers are like carousels, but worse. Since you're asking for disadvantages, tickers are an antipattern because: The content is unpredictable for users. Users don't know how large the content is, what order it appears in, where it starts or ends, and how long it will take to read all of it. It either scrolls too slow or too fast. If a reader is focused ...


81

It's from print newspapers; back in the day when broadsheets were more common, they were usually presented folded in half vertically, so the most important part of the front page was the portion "above the fold", which is the first thing most people see when they see the newspaper. Analogously, this is the first part of the website you see when a page loads, ...


56

It comes from newspapers which are folded in half. Above the fold refers to content that is visible without unfolding or turning the newspaper over to see the 2nd half. This term was adapted to websites and their content that is visible without scrolling. Here is a picture of a newspaper. Everything you can see is above the fold.


48

The visual appeal of those sites is undeniable. However, they have serious problems in terms of usability: All control is taken away from the user. All of these sites force everyone to view a multi-page glossy ad, whether they want to or not. What if I just want to buy your product? What if I want to quickly get your contact information? Forget about ...


46

Paging should be used to break content into semantic or task-related groups of content, such as by your categories in your menu bar on the left. This allows users to find content by what it is (e.g., the page title in a menu) rather than where it is (e.g., page number or relative position in a scrolling page). Generally user tasks depend on what (“I need to ...


42

This is just my opinion, but it's an answer. Tickers, or marquees, where you see them, tend to inhabit small spaces. Whether that's across the front of a cinema, the back of a police car or on a train station sign. In the real world they offer an advantage in that they can display more information than the display can statically display, but in a smaller, ...


31

The accepted UX terminology for this pattern is "infinite scrolling". It's becoming more and more common in rich web apps because it's a way to keep users engaged with a minimum number of roadblocks. The accepted viewpoint is that users prefer single page versions of content when given the choice (Google's own research backs this up), but that it's ...


26

Yes, you should allow users to escape it. The Boston Globe redesign was handled by Ethan Marcotte, who wrote the book on responsive design. Combined with the CMS nature of the site makes it perfect for deployability, usability, and flexibility concerns with responsive designs. Each viewport has to morph content to promote, demote, and generally rearrange ...


22

Horizontal scrolling is terrible. Users almost always complain about it, and it's particularly a problem when paired with vertical scrolling; there's nothing worse than trying to scroll a site on mobile when you keep scrolling horizontally on accident. Lots of data backs up this idea in web user's behavior; Horizontal Attention Leans Left (for Left to Right ...


22

If I understand your question right, this is a very common problem since iOS and Android (and now OSX) never show any scrollbars. A good way to go are visual clues: If the canvas is full the last item shouldn't be completely visible. Here's an example from one of our apps: Additional thought: Windows 8 Metro (and WP7) heavily rely on visual clues for ...


21

Why not show a few items from each list, and collapse the rest? Alternatively, use an accordion, but it may not always work.


20

Horizontal scrolling like all other features requires certain conditions to exist in order to be comfortable. These conditions include display technology (screen & layout) and the navigation control technology (input devices). Let's look at the brief history of them all. Nearly all analog means of presenting information have had horizontal scrolling: ...


19

The way I understand the article is that you still want your most important content at the top where it'll most likely catch attention first. What they're arguing against is the old notion that everything must be above the fold because novice users don't know how to scroll. Well, they do, at least now. Frankly, we shouldn't be surprised. The fold matters, ...


19

The arrows on scrollbars are a functional element. If you click on them they move the screen up or down. Clicking on the area between the arrows and the position marker usually moves the screen up or down a page at a time. They are therefore not redundant as nothing else behaves in the same way. Whether or not they are needed is a different issue. While ...


18

I think of this more as a mental model issue. Imagine if there was no mouse, but rather you were doing it with your hand. Most people are right-handed. My mental model is that I am moving the scrollbar with my right hand. Therefore, scrollbar on the left would indicate that my arm is moving across (in front of) the content and blocking my vision so I can ...


18

I believe this was simply done because we read from top to bottom. The choice was made pretty early on, and was probably influenced a lot by technical limitations. Because text is encoded linearly, most text editors (not necessarily word processors) had a limit in the number of columns and rows they could display. If you go far back this was typically along ...


17

Aesthetics help usability. Many things "just" look nice, but when it comes to such key elements as scroll bars, their visual appeal can make them more usable. It's important that they look different from a standard scroll bar, because in most web apps at least one of the scroll bars is the rightmost element on the page, so it's adjacent to the standard ...


17

Scrolling text can be a barrier to accessibility, so much so that WCAG requires that you provide a control that allows the user to pause, stop, or hide the moving content (SC 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide). Content that moves or auto-updates can be a barrier to anyone who has trouble reading stationary text quickly as well as anyone who has trouble ...


15

Besides the obvious... An indication that what is on screen is not the complete content. For example: Text stops mid sentence A border box shows no bottom but has the left and right edges stopping at the bottom. Even more emphasized if they have drop shadows. Text or lists that cut off the bottom half of a line. Pictures cut in half Long text which has a ...


14

They are usually used because the designer thinks that they look better. Many designers design for what looks good rather than for what is usable. For usability just use the standard scroll bars. Edit: Also, the way that different people use the scrollbar varies a lot. Some click on the bar and move it; some use a scroll wheel on their mouse; some click ...


14

This is something we've had issues with as well - perhaps this solution may help you. The general idea is that you have a group of elements with arrows at the top and bottom (these can be clicked to scroll). The user can also use a scroll wheel inside the area to scroll. There's no real affordance of scrolling here, but it provides an alternative method for ...


14

The conceptual model isn't "left arrow moves the elements left"; it's "left arrow takes me to the element on the left". With indirect manipulation like this, it's probably fair to assume that users are thinking in terms of the content they're consuming rather than the spatial projection of the UI.


14

This design loses all novelty the instant you realize it's a slideshow. However, as a slideshow, it wins in these areas: having a single direction to swipe/scroll makes it easier to figure out "where do I go from here" than something like Prezi (where the "next" direction can be anywhere, even into/out of the page) a smooth transition from one page to the ...


13

You could use "Return to Top", "Jump to Top" or "Skip to Top". I would avoid using anything but "top", honestly. Alternate words like "beginning" or "start" indicate a time span or activity and are more related to media controls. If you're going for classy "Return to Top" is not a bad choice.


13

The entire point of a modal is that the user needs to focus on that task before doing anything else. Modality is most appropriate when: It’s critical to get the user’s attention. A task must be completed (or explicitly abandoned) to avoid leaving the user’s data in an ambiguous state. Considering this, I would say it would be counter ...


13

It's quite literal: Long page design (google search for the same term).


13

The history of the term "Above the fold" comes from newspapers where the articles at the top were most visible when the newspaper was folded. To quote this Wikipedia article Above the fold is the upper half of the front page of a newspaper where an important news story or photograph is often located. Papers are often displayed to customers folded so ...


13

The simplest way would be to let the user know that new content is available. These can be found in many different applications that dynamically load new content. For example say, the user has scrolled down a couple of times in an application with infinite scroll you can do something like this, For paginated applications, consider not updating content in ...



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