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5

Instead of having multiple back to top links (one per product), I personally prefer to use just one Back to top button, whether it's text, an arrow, or both, and code it to appear as they scroll down. It's always in a fixed location, usually at the bottom right corner of the screen. Then when they click it, with jQuery it smoothly scrolls back up to the ...


3

First, I would definitely not go with option #4 for the reason you outlined. I have to ask, without being able to see exactly what you are talking about, is there a reason it's a problem that the content doesn't fit within the fold of the page? Is there a lot of content and it would just stretch the page too much? Out of the choices, mine would be #2. That ...


3

You can use a popout window, this will also free some space on the report inspector : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

Chartbeat, a data analytics provider, analysed data from 2 billion visits and found that “66% of attention on a normal media page is spent below the fold.” Heatmap service provider ClickTale analyzed almost 100.000 pageviews. The result: people used the scrollbar on 76% of the pages, with 22% being scrolled all the way to the bottom regardless of the ...


3

The scrollbar has several important benefits. The height of the scrollbar relative to the window corresponds to the height of the visible content relative to that of the full content. This provides an at-a-glance sense of scope and orientation. In addition, the mere existence of the scrollbar indicates that content is hidden, and communicates the direction ...


3

Oh no, not this again. Users scroll. I've always had this discussion with people when they ask: "If we hide information underneath the fold, will they know that there is something there?" What is the first thing that people do when they land on a page? They try to discover, and one way they do that is by scrolling. If a user cannot scroll, the page will ...


3

The answer to your primary question is: no, you should not force or emulate a scroll bar on mobile devices. Explanation Mobile platforms already have a scroll bar in the interface. However, it becomes visible only when a user is scrolling. If you introduce an element that nobody else is using, you are creating an expectation for users to see this element ...


3

Though I couldn't find any research data about whether people use the scroll bar or not,other than enabling users to scroll down the page, scroll bars also provide a visual affordance to users that additional content is present below which they must scroll to see. If you hide your scrollbar, users might be aware of the additional content and may not scroll ...


2

I think one of the main problems with this is type of interaction, besides being annoying when the page scrolls instead of the module, is that more often than not the default desktop browser window designs now hide the scroll bars unless you are scrolling. Additionally, mobile devices do not show the scroll bars either and some of the older (but not that ...


2

It was designed for the majority (pareto) use case With generic scrolled content, it's more typical to read the content page by page than to jump directly to a location. Therefore, the scroll track was designed as a large click zone for paging down through content, since that was the more common use case. Note that in practice this is inconsistently ...


1

It can work but it has some issues ...so make sure there is a tutorial or a label to show the user how this works. For example, if the user hovers over the yellow part, you might include a tooltip that says Jump to code example C, for example. Note that a similar approach is used in browser and other apps...here is how the Chrome browser handles finding ...


1

I think this would really need user tests. Without that information and if I understand correctly I would opt for: A- Most users use the notification panel and don't frequently click on show more or they just do it a few times (let's say 2/3) By default scrollBar just for the main page. By default show some limit amount of notifications. If the user ...


1

This is not a "feature", it's bad (or unfortunate) design, and there are two reasons for it, and one it technical: The height of either content in the modal or the content of the page is higher than the designer anticipated. The technical cost of setting a proper height of the modal was considered too high (and in unfortunate circumstances near ...


1

Scrollbars provide three real benefits: 1. Scrolling Although this was their initial primary purpose, it was also never the only way to scroll, as users could use page up / page down or spacebar / shift + spacebar. it has largely become obsolete for users with mouse wheels, or some touch scrolling. 2. Position Scrollbars give an indication of where in ...


1

It's personal. I've seen websites employ menu elements (top level) that are invisible until the mouse goes over the menu element. I would suggest that is an example of bad UI, as the relationship to the menu element and the mouse is required and a relationship between the user and the menu element is required for the user to make a decision as to what menu ...


1

Mobile UI nowadays uses the accelerated scroll method. The faster you scroll up or down the faster the content moves up or down. It therefore becomes very easy for users to reach the bottom or top of the page easily. If the page is for reading content where I'm not wanting to get to one end or the other very quickly, I would suggest a scroll bar of some ...


1

In my experience of usability testing — most people still use the scroll bars. Including Mac users.


1

I will also give the same solution Select 2: http://ivaynberg.github.io/select2/ here you are also able to view the selected options...and scrolling would be required in both areas ('selected options' and 'options to select').. for hundreds or thousands of options, how can we display them without scrolling...


1

I'm not sure of what you are working in but I was always fond of a select box replacement written in jquery called Select 2. It has the appearance of a select box but when you click on it it gives a search box underneath. There are also examples for selecting multiple options if it is needed. Here's a quick mockup: download bmml source – ...


1

you could use an accordion, with all the option categories collapsed by default. clicking on one expands it. while clicking it again collapses it, like a toggle. clicking on another one expands that and collapses anything else thats currently open. after making a selection, the selection will be a part of the title in the accordion.


1

Most websites seem so make use of the words "back" and "top" most of the times (see this list for examples) in various combinations (back to top, back to the top, to top, top,...). I do not completely understand what you mean with it not being "classy" enough. What is your definition of classy and which analysis shows that users find it insufficiently ...


1

I use an up-arrow and the word "Top". Regular Hovered Here is why I use it: It is intuitive - Everyone knows where it's going It is clear - Don't have to worry about ambiguous wording like 'Back to Top' It is simple - Minimal wording to reduce crowding of the button.


1

What do you think about to create overlay bottom bar with the context buttons? Update: Just to explain the color scheme behind the screen: Green button is 'Save', red button is 'Cancel', blue button is in this case used to check not assigned entries. This is just concrete implementation of idea to have bottom-bar to eliminate 'scrolling orgies'.



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