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82

hiding the scroll bar is a bad practice, for a few reasons: some people do not have a scroll wheel - just as you're worried. Just like how that impoverished county an hour away counts as "3rd world economy" by international standards, so too today do we find unusual relics of usability times 'long past' the scroll cursor is an indicator of position. It ...


22

Overall, I believe hiding the scrollbar is bad practice. Even if everyone has a scroll-wheel on their mice, people are still prefer the scrollbar to go up and down a page. Also people might become intimidated by the lack of a scrollbar since the bar is an indication that there's more to see on the page than you currently see.


14

Specific to your question title, unless you have absolute control over the platform, you should not make any assumptions about the hardware that your users may be employing. There are a myriad of input devices that already may be in play: touchpads/trackpads, trackballs, mice, touch screens, etc., let alone who knows what may become available in 3 months, ...


13

No. Not everyone has a mouse wheel. Some users don't even use a mouse. They use the trackpad and the keyboard. Now, your real question whether it is good UX to hide the scroll bar and show it only during scrolling: in my opinion.. No. Strictly speaking, users without a mouse and without a scroll bar can still scroll, e.g. using the space bar in the web ...


9

I believe it’s a means of providing the ability to cancel a half-executed command. Imagine a user is 45% down a long page. The user attempts to perform a drag operation on the contents of the window (maybe to move an icon or select some text), but accidentally “catches” the scrollbar slider instead, resulting in scrolling page to X% down, and leaving the ...


8

This has already been said in the comments, but it really ought to be an answer: Do not hide the scroll bar, because most laptops do not have a scroll wheel. At best they have a rather substandard scroll area to one side of the mouse pad. I speak as someone who took an online exam which assumed the use of a mouse scroll wheel would be possible.


8

I've been in this situation many times. What I've always done is program the app to scroll the child-most element that the cursor is over and only that element: To clarify, when I say only that element, I mean that if you're scrolling an element in one direction and you reach the end of that scrollbar, I program it such that it does not proceed by ...


6

A bad situation to be in, but it somtimes happens when maintaining old applications. There are a few things you could do to make things a little less confusing: Scroll the main window scrollbar by default, and only scroll inner controls if the user explicitly clicks on them. This would also require some visual feedback on which control is currently ...


5

I think all of the other answers have made it clear about not being able to assume everyone has a scroll wheel. To expand upon the other aspects of the question...yes, OSX has made hidden scroll bars the default behavior. But some things to keep in mind: people that use OSX will be used to this. So it may make sense if you are writing OSX software. It's ...


5

Instead of having multiple back to top links (one per product), I personally prefer to use just one Back to top button, whether it's text, an arrow, or both, and code it to appear as they scroll down. It's always in a fixed location, usually at the bottom right corner of the screen. Then when they click it, with jQuery it smoothly scrolls back up to the ...


4

Not even every mouse, Apple's Mighty Mouse has no scrollbar, but you can use the whole area for scrolling. Hiding useless scrollbars when the content is smaller is okay and expected by most, but hiding active scrollbars was the worst decission ever and is only confusing the average user. Might make a little sense on tiny mobile phones, but even there it ...


4

As far as I can tell, there is no good reason for it. The behavior was started by Microsoft (Windows) and sadly taken over in other user interfaces such as KDE. Here is some more e-mail conversation going on about the subject. Many people (including mysef) find it annoying for the simple reason that you look at the windows contents while dragging and ...


4

Horizontal Scrolling: A Huge No No I would honestly have to say no. Usability expert Jakob Nielson would tell you the same. In his article Top 10 Web Design Mistakes of 2002, he plain out states that one should avoid horizontal scrolling on web pages at all costs. Today this is 10x less acceptable than it was 12 years ago, especially since websites have ...


4

Hide When Focus Lost Generally users not only need to write in a text control, they need to read it too. A scrollbar is more than a control. It’s a display too that provides vital information useful for reading. If you hide the scrollbars when the text control hasn’t focus, then when the users read the text while the text control is out of focus: The ...


4

You definitely should try to avoid nesting scrollable areas inside a webpage if possible: scrollable areas are breaking page interaction (nested block will be scrolled instead of outer page itself while using tracking pads or mouse wheels for scrolling). There are some exceptions: You may use nested scrolling panes if they're shown temporary (like in ...


3

Just throw away the horisontal scroll! Then you have some options: Use carousel-like scrolling controls Change layout with one that has no scroll: some pictures and link "More pictures", or just wrap elements. Use tabs for different content type.


3

I would keep the users place. The user will return to the application expecting it to be where they left it rather than having had it move arbitrarily up. You should notify them that more things have happened but keep the viewport focused on the last place they left it. this the way facebook do it with their activity stream on mobile, it keeps it's position ...


2

Providing too much information with matrix view, as in your panel, makes it hard to process it. The reason is there is conflict of view patterns: per-row or per-column. So there could be a risk of loosing eye-view path, see the image. You could see how Amazon organizes information for its hudge number of servers: Source . Source So, per-row view with ...


2

A UI should always function in a way which is plausible to the mind of the user, based on their experience of manipulating objects in the real world. The scroll bar is locked to either vertical or horizontal movement. If you drag your mouse pointer too far in a direction where the scroll can't follow, then at some point it is illogical for the scroll to keep ...


2

Google recently experimented with just removing the scroll arrows in Chrome 32, and found that users were so upset with the change that they had to put them back in Chrome 34. Since the arrows are the one feature of the scrollbar that is completely duplicated by the wheel, it is clear that not all users have or want to use their scroll wheel. The most I've ...


2

It's not common to have a scroll both at the top and at the bottom of the table because it would be redundant (not filling a purpose) in a correctly implemented table component. The table component should show the data it contains in an area inside of itself, meaning that certain parts of the table (the column header, bottom scroll bar, possible action bar ...


2

If an area is scrollable, let the user know by putting in a scroll bar. Often, a scroll bar will already appear if you have this situation, so taking the effort to remove a scrollbar is pointless to me. But first I think you have to really think about your listitems. If you want all of the items to be visible, making a new page for the listitems may be ...


2

The closest thing I can think of to what you're looking for are Interface Guidelines. A good example of this is Apple's iOS 7 Human Interface Guidelines, specifically the controls section. They have lots of pictures of UI elements with call outs, descriptions of how they are meant to be used, and defining characteristics. Other sources: iOS 7 Human ...


2

Absolutely do not change the default behaviour in this regard. Why? Because this is one of those rare things where OS behaviour is too strictly and consistently defined to break it. As of yet I have not seen a single application breaking this behaviour (not counting crazy old half emulated applications which were never meant to be run on windows or are ...


2

Chartbeat, a data analytics provider, analysed data from 2 billion visits and found that “66% of attention on a normal media page is spent below the fold.” Heatmap service provider ClickTale analyzed almost 100.000 pageviews. The result: people used the scrollbar on 76% of the pages, with 22% being scrolled all the way to the bottom regardless of the ...


1

Actually, that is the whole purpose of that class of controls: listbox, listview, etc.. There are times when we as developers need to present a large list of items in a constrained space. Where large is defined as more items than will fit in the space available. These controls nicely encapsulate the idea of presenting the list. As a developer, I can ...


1

Skinning any standard UI Elements sucks hard. Why not using the forms, radios buttons, checkboxes, scrollbars etc. the user is used to from his favorite browser or device? Users are used to native UI. The native UI is always faster and it works. Users don't have to learn new UI elements. The effort is often to high to develop good working UI elements. ...


1

There is a common trend emerging in interface and interaction design where you show or hide things based on user context and interaction with the website. This would be an example of hiding thing unless the need for it arises as a way to keep the design or overall look and feel 'cleaner'. In a way this is not unlike the browser scrollbar only appearing when ...


1

I can't speak to any particular data, nor why, specifically, Apple does it. You'd have to ask Apple. That said, note that this is an option that can be changed: If I had to toss out a hunch: Most Macs are now laptops. Most Macbook users use the Apple touch pad. The touch pad makes it very easy to toggle the scrolls on and off. Yes, you do lose the ...


1

First let's discuss the reasons for this refresh. It can be caused by: A hard refresh from the user clicking on the browser refresh button or keyboard shortcut User submitting a form with the screen switching to the confirmation message Scripts that require the page to be refreshed for the data to be regenerated There might definitely be many outlying ...



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