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86

hiding the scroll bar is a bad practice, for a few reasons: some people do not have a scroll wheel - just as you're worried. Just like how that impoverished county an hour away counts as "3rd world economy" by international standards, so too today do we find unusual relics of usability times 'long past' the scroll cursor is an indicator of position. It ...


23

Overall, I believe hiding the scrollbar is bad practice. Even if everyone has a scroll-wheel on their mice, people are still prefer the scrollbar to go up and down a page. Also people might become intimidated by the lack of a scrollbar since the bar is an indication that there's more to see on the page than you currently see.


14

Specific to your question title, unless you have absolute control over the platform, you should not make any assumptions about the hardware that your users may be employing. There are a myriad of input devices that already may be in play: touchpads/trackpads, trackballs, mice, touch screens, etc., let alone who knows what may become available in 3 months, ...


13

No. Not everyone has a mouse wheel. Some users don't even use a mouse. They use the trackpad and the keyboard. Now, your real question whether it is good UX to hide the scroll bar and show it only during scrolling: in my opinion.. No. Strictly speaking, users without a mouse and without a scroll bar can still scroll, e.g. using the space bar in the web ...


8

This has already been said in the comments, but it really ought to be an answer: Do not hide the scroll bar, because most laptops do not have a scroll wheel. At best they have a rather substandard scroll area to one side of the mouse pad. I speak as someone who took an online exam which assumed the use of a mouse scroll wheel would be possible.


8

I've been in this situation many times. What I've always done is program the app to scroll the child-most element that the cursor is over and only that element: To clarify, when I say only that element, I mean that if you're scrolling an element in one direction and you reach the end of that scrollbar, I program it such that it does not proceed by ...


7

A bad situation to be in, but it somtimes happens when maintaining old applications. There are a few things you could do to make things a little less confusing: Scroll the main window scrollbar by default, and only scroll inner controls if the user explicitly clicks on them. This would also require some visual feedback on which control is currently ...


5

Instead of having multiple back to top links (one per product), I personally prefer to use just one Back to top button, whether it's text, an arrow, or both, and code it to appear as they scroll down. It's always in a fixed location, usually at the bottom right corner of the screen. Then when they click it, with jQuery it smoothly scrolls back up to the ...


5

You definitely should try to avoid nesting scrollable areas inside a webpage if possible: scrollable areas are breaking page interaction (nested block will be scrolled instead of outer page itself while using tracking pads or mouse wheels for scrolling). There are some exceptions: You may use nested scrolling panes if they're shown temporary (like in ...


5

I think all of the other answers have made it clear about not being able to assume everyone has a scroll wheel. To expand upon the other aspects of the question...yes, OSX has made hidden scroll bars the default behavior. But some things to keep in mind: people that use OSX will be used to this. So it may make sense if you are writing OSX software. It's ...


4

Not even every mouse, Apple's Mighty Mouse has no scrollbar, but you can use the whole area for scrolling. Hiding useless scrollbars when the content is smaller is okay and expected by most, but hiding active scrollbars was the worst decission ever and is only confusing the average user. Might make a little sense on tiny mobile phones, but even there it ...


3

Though I couldn't find any research data about whether people use the scroll bar or not,other than enabling users to scroll down the page, scroll bars also provide a visual affordance to users that additional content is present below which they must scroll to see. If you hide your scrollbar, users might be aware of the additional content and may not scroll ...


3

If an area is scrollable, let the user know by putting in a scroll bar. Often, a scroll bar will already appear if you have this situation, so taking the effort to remove a scrollbar is pointless to me. But first I think you have to really think about your listitems. If you want all of the items to be visible, making a new page for the listitems may be ...


3

You can use a popout window, this will also free some space on the report inspector : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

Chartbeat, a data analytics provider, analysed data from 2 billion visits and found that “66% of attention on a normal media page is spent below the fold.” Heatmap service provider ClickTale analyzed almost 100.000 pageviews. The result: people used the scrollbar on 76% of the pages, with 22% being scrolled all the way to the bottom regardless of the ...


3

The closest thing I can think of to what you're looking for are Interface Guidelines. A good example of this is Apple's iOS 7 Human Interface Guidelines, specifically the controls section. They have lots of pictures of UI elements with call outs, descriptions of how they are meant to be used, and defining characteristics. Other sources: iOS 7 Human ...


3

The scrollbar has several important benefits. The height of the scrollbar relative to the window corresponds to the height of the visible content relative to that of the full content. This provides an at-a-glance sense of scope and orientation. In addition, the mere existence of the scrollbar indicates that content is hidden, and communicates the direction ...


3

The answer to your primary question is: no, you should not force or emulate a scroll bar on mobile devices. Explanation Mobile platforms already have a scroll bar in the interface. However, it becomes visible only when a user is scrolling. If you introduce an element that nobody else is using, you are creating an expectation for users to see this element ...


3

Oh no, not this again. Users scroll. I've always had this discussion with people when they ask: "If we hide information underneath the fold, will they know that there is something there?" What is the first thing that people do when they land on a page? They try to discover, and one way they do that is by scrolling. If a user cannot scroll, the page will ...


2

I think one of the main problems with this is type of interaction, besides being annoying when the page scrolls instead of the module, is that more often than not the default desktop browser window designs now hide the scroll bars unless you are scrolling. Additionally, mobile devices do not show the scroll bars either and some of the older (but not that ...


2

Google recently experimented with just removing the scroll arrows in Chrome 32, and found that users were so upset with the change that they had to put them back in Chrome 34. Since the arrows are the one feature of the scrollbar that is completely duplicated by the wheel, it is clear that not all users have or want to use their scroll wheel. The most I've ...


2

Absolutely do not change the default behaviour in this regard. Why? Because this is one of those rare things where OS behaviour is too strictly and consistently defined to break it. As of yet I have not seen a single application breaking this behaviour (not counting crazy old half emulated applications which were never meant to be run on windows or are ...


1

In my experience of usability testing — most people still use the scroll bars. Including Mac users.


1

I will also give the same solution Select 2: http://ivaynberg.github.io/select2/ here you are also able to view the selected options...and scrolling would be required in both areas ('selected options' and 'options to select').. for hundreds or thousands of options, how can we display them without scrolling...


1

I'm not sure of what you are working in but I was always fond of a select box replacement written in jquery called Select 2. It has the appearance of a select box but when you click on it it gives a search box underneath. There are also examples for selecting multiple options if it is needed. Here's a quick mockup: download bmml source – ...


1

you could use an accordion, with all the option categories collapsed by default. clicking on one expands it. while clicking it again collapses it, like a toggle. clicking on another one expands that and collapses anything else thats currently open. after making a selection, the selection will be a part of the title in the accordion.


1

Is this a reasonable default? Yes, if you want the small areas scrollable. What can be done to improve the user experience here? Get rid of te nesting, use 3 tabs for example, content area 1, content area 2, rest of page. Or replace areas with buttons to open a popupwindow. With more details what is inside the boxes people can give you better specialized ...


1

Actually, that is the whole purpose of that class of controls: listbox, listview, etc.. There are times when we as developers need to present a large list of items in a constrained space. Where large is defined as more items than will fit in the space available. These controls nicely encapsulate the idea of presenting the list. As a developer, I can ...


1

Skinning any standard UI Elements reduces usability. Why not using the forms, radios buttons, checkboxes, scrollbars etc. the user is used to from his favorite browser or device? Users are used to native UI. The native UI is always faster and it works. Users don't have to learn new UI elements. The effort is often to high to develop good working UI ...


1

There is a common trend emerging in interface and interaction design where you show or hide things based on user context and interaction with the website. This would be an example of hiding thing unless the need for it arises as a way to keep the design or overall look and feel 'cleaner'. In a way this is not unlike the browser scrollbar only appearing when ...



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