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85

hiding the scroll bar is a bad practice, for a few reasons: some people do not have a scroll wheel - just as you're worried. Just like how that impoverished county an hour away counts as "3rd world economy" by international standards, so too today do we find unusual relics of usability times 'long past' the scroll cursor is an indicator of position. It ...


24

So, a few alternatives. Emulating a "real" scrollbar while maintaining infinite scrolling Emulation-oriented approach restore the usual scrollbars while still providing infinite scrolling. They're useful if the content actually has a reasonable end. An image gallery like in the above example is such a thing, while a counter-example would be 9gag's "Vote" ...


23

Overall, I believe hiding the scrollbar is bad practice. Even if everyone has a scroll-wheel on their mice, people are still prefer the scrollbar to go up and down a page. Also people might become intimidated by the lack of a scrollbar since the bar is an indication that there's more to see on the page than you currently see.


20

Horizontal scrolling is terrible. Users almost always complain about it, and it's particularly a problem when paired with vertical scrolling; there's nothing worse than trying to scroll a site on mobile when you keep scrolling horizontally on accident. Lots of data backs up this idea in web user's behavior; Horizontal Attention Leans Left (for Left to Right ...


19

The arrows on scrollbars are a functional element. If you click on them they move the screen up or down. Clicking on the area between the arrows and the position marker usually moves the screen up or down a page at a time. They are therefore not redundant as nothing else behaves in the same way. Whether or not they are needed is a different issue. While ...


18

Horizontal scrolling like all other features requires certain conditions to exist in order to be comfortable. These conditions include display technology (screen & layout) and the navigation control technology (input devices). Let's look at the brief history of them all. Nearly all analog means of presenting information have had horizontal scrolling: ...


18

There is no reason to force a user to read the terms and conditions first. It is not a legal requirement and it doesn't improve the UX. Don't do it. Legally they simply have to agree to the terms and conditions, and if they choose not to read them, then that is their problem. UX wise, what part of the experience are you trying to improve by doing this? ...


17

I believe this design was invented by McCrickard and Catrambone of the Georgia Institute of Technology: McCrickard DS & Catrambone R (1999). Beyond the scrollbar: An evolution and evaluation of alternative navigation techniques. Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages, p270-277. It seems very similar ideas were independently ...


16

Aesthetics help usability. Many things "just" look nice, but when it comes to such key elements as scroll bars, their visual appeal can make them more usable. It's important that they look different from a standard scroll bar, because in most web apps at least one of the scroll bars is the rightmost element on the page, so it's adjacent to the standard ...


14

They are usually used because the designer thinks that they look better. Many designers design for what looks good rather than for what is usable. For usability just use the standard scroll bars. Edit: Also, the way that different people use the scrollbar varies a lot. Some click on the bar and move it; some use a scroll wheel on their mouse; some click ...


14

Specific to your question title, unless you have absolute control over the platform, you should not make any assumptions about the hardware that your users may be employing. There are a myriad of input devices that already may be in play: touchpads/trackpads, trackballs, mice, touch screens, etc., let alone who knows what may become available in 3 months, ...


13

You could use "Return to Top", "Jump to Top" or "Skip to Top". I would avoid using anything but "top", honestly. Alternate words like "beginning" or "start" indicate a time span or activity and are more related to media controls. If you're going for classy "Return to Top" is not a bad choice.


13

No. Not everyone has a mouse wheel. Some users don't even use a mouse. They use the trackpad and the keyboard. Now, your real question whether it is good UX to hide the scroll bar and show it only during scrolling: in my opinion.. No. Strictly speaking, users without a mouse and without a scroll bar can still scroll, e.g. using the space bar in the web ...


12

I believe it’s a means of providing the ability to cancel a half-executed command. Imagine a user is 45% down a long page. The user attempts to perform a drag operation on the contents of the window (maybe to move an icon or select some text), but accidentally “catches” the scrollbar slider instead, resulting in scrolling page to X% down, and leaving the ...


11

One of the immediate advantages of using inner scroll panels is to maintain page layout when there's an abundance of content that is being displayed. If all content heights are forwarded out to the parent scroll then that can easily make the page very long, and a stress to navigate in. Another advantage, considering your point with how inner scrolling is ...


8

I have found a heat map study from mozilla ui lab for the firefox browser. It's visualize the user behavior clearly. Mozilla UI lab heat map study Based on over 117,000 Windows 7 and Vista Test Pilot submissions from 7 days in July 2010 The Up arrow on the scrollbar was used on average by 27% of users. The Down arrow was used on average by 33% ...


8

Mac OS X scrollbars has no these arrows (at least by default) for a couple of years already. And it seems like most of the users are OK with this. But, for Mac OS X it's a system-wide change and every (almost) app is affected by it so everything behaves the same way. Actually, I don't see any reason to drop these arrows off (except for the rare design ...


8

This has already been said in the comments, but it really ought to be an answer: Do not hide the scroll bar, because most laptops do not have a scroll wheel. At best they have a rather substandard scroll area to one side of the mouse pad. I speak as someone who took an online exam which assumed the use of a mouse scroll wheel would be possible.


8

I've been in this situation many times. What I've always done is program the app to scroll the child-most element that the cursor is over and only that element: To clarify, when I say only that element, I mean that if you're scrolling an element in one direction and you reach the end of that scrollbar, I program it such that it does not proceed by ...


7

Have a look at http://www.tchibo.de/. When you scroll down something similar is used; it's called a visual scrollbar or preview scrollbar. It shows the position of the main window content on a thumbnail of the very long page content. Is this what you are looking for?


7

In general I try to avoid double scrollbars whenever possible. We've had bad reactions to them in usability testing, and users have reported being stymied when faced with them. Inner scrollbars can confuse users, and are especially frustrating due to mousewheel behavior. For mobile users, it's confusing, especially if there's no good indication that an ...


7

Yes, it is confusing, as you have no visual indicator that you have finished the document. The legal issue it the real problem here. In a strict legal sense, you can not be considered to have agreed to part of a document that was hidden from you. This is like someone adding pages to the back of a page in a document that you did not know was there. It is ...


6

I don't think there's an official name for this feature. I call it 'scrollbar indicator'. Here are a few relevant articles that describe it: Techdreams article Habitually Good article


6

Where there is a list of content, scrollbars are imperative. Users are being taught to understand scrolling to the end of loaded content & then being able to scroll more after more content is loaded through use of platforms such as twitter and facebook. The scrollbar is no longer necessarily seen an indicator of the length of lists when on a web ...


6

A bad situation to be in, but it somtimes happens when maintaining old applications. There are a few things you could do to make things a little less confusing: Scroll the main window scrollbar by default, and only scroll inner controls if the user explicitly clicks on them. This would also require some visual feedback on which control is currently ...


5

On clear advantage to vertical scrolling is that the user gets to control which portion of the text is on the screen. If I'm reading a book, (or a document set up with pages that I need to scroll horizontally through), then I often find situations where I am flipping back and forth between pages to try to mentally connect two portions of related text (or ...


5

You have a couple of other options to: when the site loads make the scroll bar visible for 3-5 seconds, then make it go away, it will probably make the user focus on that area you could always put an arrow down to symbolize the more option for that panel and try to integrate the arrow within the pane with the items so that when the user goes over it it ...


5

I have found for the Eclipse Editor "Scrollbar markers" or "Scrollbar annotations". In some patterns it's called "Annotated scrollbars". See following link: http://quince.infragistics.com/Patterns/Annotated%20Scrollbar.aspx


5

What about just using the word "Top"? As long as your style clearly indicates this is a link (along the lines of Top - or even better, with a tiny arrow pointing up right next to it) would - in my view - make the target of this link quite clear.


5

You're all forgetting ACCESSIBILITY! Various physical conditions can make scrolling or dragging really difficult. Clicking is a comparatively simple action to do. Buttons help.



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