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85

You can try displaying multiple lines per record, e.g.: You can also go a step further by making each row a summary view that can be expanded so that the user can see the complete record, e.g.: In the pic above, the user is interested in Mary Jane's complete info, so she clicks on the triangle next to her name to see the complete record. Also, I ...


80

Since all of the data after the first three columns is numeric, you can round off so that the width of each column is as little as four characters. Full Length Shorter Tiny ------------ ------- ---- $143,573.39 $143.6k 144k 112.54% 112.5% 113 198,220,329 198.2m 198m You might decide which version to display based on the ...


55

If the columns are out-growing the rows, you can try to put the rows as columns


47

That really depends on where you are in the world. Worldwide 1024x768 is still the most common, however 1366x768 is the only resolution that is actually increasing in take-up (presumably because this seems to be the standard widescreen for modern laptops). The website StatCounter.com should help give you some further knowledge on this. HOWEVER, bear in ...


43

This sounds a lot like the case where the customer/product manager wants everything on the main screen vs. everything you need on the main screen. IMHO, a dashboard screen should give the user an overview of everything... but to get details on a portion of that (e.g. the 275% increase in sales this week) the user should "drill-down" into the data to see the ...


38

The short answer is: if you already account for 6 different mobile screen resolutions, you should also account for many large screen resolutions - keep things consistent. The long answer: You're over-complicating this. There're 28 "standard" resolutions and creating a dedicated layout for all of them takes too much precious time. Instead, you should follow ...


26

Yes, reducing white space does degrade the user experience ,The reason being readability of a site is critical in almost all cases and can influence how effectively your users navigate your site. To quote this article about Negative space (also known as white space) Text on the web is unlike text on any other platform and we all tailor our designs so ...


20

Table is a good way to present large amount of data. However, with more than 5 columns, tables quickly become unreadable. If your data is changing in real time as you say it, the user most likely won't be able to make his decision in time if he had to look at 15 different columns at the same time. Google knows best that the most important consideration when ...


19

Keep in mind that laptops and desktops are no longer the only web-enabled devices. The iPad has a resolution of 1024x768, the iPhone 4 has a resolution of 960x640, assuming you use them in landscape mode.


17

A complete "it depends". You can, of course, use white space effectively to define hierarchy and help us express to the person using the site what is important, what isn't, and guide peoples attention through the page. However it's one tool (and constraint) among many in building a great user experience. You need to balance its use with the size of the ...


16

I've always found "standard resolution" to be clear when speaking to people, but that is likely to change with time. It is important to know that "retina" is an Apple trademark and not a technical term for a resolution, so I try to avoid the term. Android is more specific by using the terms hdpi (1.5x) and xhdpi (2x or retina equivalent), so when speaking ...


15

"...how related are viewport sizes to screen resolution?" This is an interesting question. This answer is probably a good starting point to get the information you're looking for. I don't have any empirical data to support this, but I imagine that viewport size and screen resolution diverge as screen resolution increases. And there's probably a distinct ...


15

From a UX perspective - KEEP the bad images. The user will want to know what they're buying and if the image is bad/stretched it still gives a certain % of the total information available. This gives the user an improved holistic view of their order. You may lose sales by removing the images if user's won't order without knowing, for example, what shade of ...


15

This report was generated 05/31/2013 based on the last 15,000 page views to each website tracked by W3Counter. W3Counter's sample currently includes 66,635 websites. The browser market share graph includes data from all versions of the named browser families, not only the top 10 as listed below. Macs are quite costly and their market penetration in the ...


14

The choice of minimum screen resolution all comes down to how many users you are willing to exclude. If you do not have a history of resolution data for your specific users, one option is to use public, global usage statistics as a guideline. Using one such source of global data, I created the following graph to help convey the state of desktop screen ...


14

This answer might surprise you, but the reason why 1366x768 is the most common laptop resolution is because a dominant notebook LCD-panel manufacturer called AU Optronics (AUO) makes vast majority of their panels in 1366x768, regardless of the actual size. Many of their 11'6", 12.5", 13.3", 14", 15.6" panels only come in 1366x768. These panels can be found ...


13

I know you've selected an answer, but I wanted to bring up something that I think is pretty important: data vs. information. I've been thinking a lot about this recently, so it's at the front of my headmeats. What you're doing is showing data. It's raw, it all seems really important, but in reality most people don't need to see the data. What they really ...


12

statcounter only goes back to 2009, but their graph shows that as far back as then, it was already the majority: http://gs.statcounter.com/#resolution-ww-yearly-2008-2011 I am loathe to mention w3schools.com, but they have a good chart showing their own stats, and at the very least, it correlates pretty well to the statcounter data: ...


12

I wasn't sure whether to post this as a comment or an answer. I faced this problem before, and instead of stretching the images, I re-did them using a light color background (could have a very subtle texture) and leaving the original picture in the middle, at its true size. If you have two instances of the same pic (small for index, big for details, for ...


11

"but nowadays it must be something much higher" Every answer in here seems to ignore the entire mobile world. Sure, desktop screens are getting bigger. But everyone is also using mobile devices. So much of the web is now being accessed on phones and tablets. Adaptive design is really the path to take.


11

Instead of designing your UI for a single resolution, you should design it to be resolution-independent. Take a look at how this is handled in Android: http://developer.android.com/guide/practices/screens_support.html The resolution you are using (320x480) is a typical MDPI resolution, so you could basically continue using it, as long as you deliver your ...


9

A fluid layout with limits can offer the best of both worlds. The layout fills the width of the browser window, but at a certain limit (1200 pixels, for example) the layout won't get any wider. Thus users with 30" widescreen monitors will be able to use a full screen window without ridiculous horizontal pages. Within the overall width, text size is ...


9

This subject has been a FUD mess for 15 years. Factors that made it complicated: Browser chrome. Plugin bars, like Yahoo search bar Scale fonts vs Zoom. Drastically different behavior. Liquid Design. (stretches based on percentages) Different design depending on screen resolution. Maximized vs. floating browser windows. (viewport) Mobile browsers Pinch ...


9

The resolution that you design for depends on the resolution that your target audience will be using. Sometimes you know this in advance, but if not, you need to try remain flexible within a set of resolutions. This is one of the reasons that responsive design is so useful. You need to design without a fixed resolution in mind, but design in a way that ...


8

One example I can think of that might inspire something is MLB.com's standings page, which is a table with way too many columns, but the customization interface is instantly intuitive (to me - and it's not aimed at a techie audience). You probably don't want MLBAM's arbitrary limit on the maximum number of columns you can have, of course. The biggest UI ...


8

The most important thing seems to me to allow views of multiple levels of detail at once and illustrate the relationships between the views. Where screen estate really kicks in, is when you can switch from one level to another by just looking at a different part of the screen, rather than clicking on something. So first to do I think is getting multiple ...


8

The discrepancy is due to the status bar (where the clock and wireless status is shown) which is 20px high on the regular display (and 40px on the retina display). Whether that is also the size you should design the app UI to depends on whether your app runs full-screen (i.e. hides the status bar) or not. Generally it should not hide the status bar unless ...


8

There's two computer engineering concepts that you must first understand. Memory The first is RAM (random access memory). RAM is very fast storage compared to the harddrive. Apps are transferred from the harddrive to RAM when you use a app so you can have fast access to it. What happens when programs use more RAM than you have? Well, some pieces of the ...


8

Let your content dictate your decision, not possible devices. Will the site be easier/better to use if you created a larger version or will it just be bigger? If the answer is yes, then how much effort is required to do so and what percentage of users will be able to take advantage of it? Also if you decide to make the additional version, consider that the ...


8

Clients that complain about 'all the extra space' are usually looking at things from a visual design layout standpoint rather than UX/usability standpoint as if they were printing out the site and hanging it above their fireplace as a work of art. Yes, if you stretch your browser to 1920...a LOT of web sites will have lots of blank space. That doesn't ...



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