Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

You should use an empty alt attribute for images that are purely decorative. I'd argue that in the example you gave it is worth supplying an alt attribute that describes the image e.g. alt="Portrait of Jane Doe". @KitGrose mentions that including this text will also make the image searchable to image search engines such as Google Image. I reserve empty alt ...


6

To begin with, most companies (i.e., clients) are little educated about accessibility. This is in the same way that many commercial spaces are not designed for wheelchair users, and even in public spaces information boards are often too high for those. In addition, accessibility concerns are vast and diverse. Yet the user group they serve is relatively low ...


4

Without accessibility you cannot sell your product to some very large customers like the US government or the European Union (soon) because it is a pre-requisite. For many non-institutional customers this isn't a concern. Still, implementing accessibility is a good practice for many reasons (first of all ethical). Source: Section 508 Amendment to the ...


3

What is necessary is all relative. That said, there are plenty of agencies where quality of product takes a back seat to winning design awards. Given that they are still in business and making money, from a purely business perspective, I guess accessibility isn't necessary for them. But like any industry, there are plenty of financially succesful ...


3

It sounds as if this agency are not fully educated in UX, they may have a loose definition or use it as a marketing tool. As far as I can tell there may well be projects where you know that the end user will, for example, always have perfect 20/20 vision (if it's aimed at active RAF pilots for example) in which case you can safely drop that part of the ...


2

Voice browser is a custom solution for people who can't see, while screen reader is a way to target people who can't see for services that are primarily designed for mainstream audience. To answer your question, yes it's necessary to have a tool like that for developers to use. Since what if I am trying to make a website that is for people who can't see, ...


2

Some experience with this, but not a developer. Progressive disclosure is not in and of itself inaccessible; it's the way it's implemented. Be really careful with show and hide properties. One of my former teammates is visually impaired and we relied on him to test public-facing web apps. He found two big issues that made it impossible for him to proceed ...


2

In-page 3rd party plugins for reading websites aloud are no longer useful for websites, and I'd even go as far as to say they're worse for accessibility than not including it. If people benefit from using screenreaders then it is highly likely that they would have discovered this long before visiting your website. After all, Jakob's Law of the Web User ...


1

I think running the website through something like wave can give you a good idea on your sites accessibility. Personally I would not pay for something like BrowseAloud I would try to adhere to WCAG 2.0 and W3C (as suggested by JonW), and good programming practice, and run actual tests with real users using screen readers like JAWS. (there are a number ...


1

Voice Browsers and Screen Readers are really two separate technologies that just both happen to use TTS, but that's about as much as they have in common.They're really separate technologies with separate audiences, goals and concerns. Here are some of the main differences that come to mind: (Disclaimer - my background is very much on the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible