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11

I know what you're thinking when you say "as flexible as possible to the point where the database basically controls the GUI layouts", but this is a warning sign: you're going to end up with an app that is generic at the cost of usability. I see this a lot with "programmer UIs", where developers have extended their database and object oriented architecture ...


7

There are a lot of designs/applications using same approach: Example 1 Example 2 Don't you think your first column is too empty? You can simplify the layout a bit combining both ideas (tree & switch) and use only one tree or simplified accordion. Simplified tree Accordion Finally, there is a way to make this approach a bit more flexible: ...


7

Don't show the numbers to the test takers, it will only confuse them. But you may want to use them internally. Balanced keying (using an approximately equal amount of positively and negatively keyed items) is often used in psychometry and is considered good practice. It allows you to approach a topic from different perspectives. Some sample items ...


5

This is a problem I thought about a lot for our site as we have a lot of content categories. A flat horizontal menu wouldn't come close to working and even drop down menus with multiple sub-levels would probably start getting overwhelmed. In the end, I settled on a cross between a mega-menu and a tab interface. At present, including the parent categories, ...


5

From my expirience I said yes. Beacause today the browser don't work like a text scaling but like zoom. The difference? Scrolling of course, specially horizontal scrolling and people with low vision problem don't like horizontal scrolling (or have serious usability problem with this kind of scrolling).. I can suggest you some articles. A list a part - an ...


5

The answer is to validate in each tier so that you always ensure data integrity. This protects you against the scenario where any of the prior tier validations were skipped. I can't stand when developers build methods that assume the data has already be validated. Let's take the following scenario where your tiers are: Client Server Service Database ...


3

Building on Marielle's excellent answer, I just want to add that you should be careful when assigning numerical values to a scale that is still basically qualitative in nature. That doesn't mean you shouldn't, you should just be careful how you use those values. When you have a value, you can calculate things like percent changes between two measurement ...


3

I have some points to consider: Make sure long strings don't break the layout. Naturally I'm talking about the data itself, but the surrounding UI might also suffer. For example, consider a command bar with buttons. When the text on the buttons is translated, they might grow large and overflow the bar. Make the UI "lazy load" some of the info and ...


2

If you're lucky enough to have a 2560x1440 screen and your desktop app looks odd even though you are already assigning the extra space to the controls that can make use of it, and there is no added value in making the presentation/input areas that big, then consider introducing an extra pane in those extreme situations. The content of this extra panel ...


2

Use the available space as well as possible, and never limit the size unless there is a very good reason to. Specifically, the primary content area of your application should scale to contain more content the larger the screen gets. This use case is also one of Microsoft's major drivers for the Ribbon interface; the Ribbon scales well so that it can take ...


2

Nice question. I see a couple of ways of approaching this. Consider uniting the contents of this tab with one of the other tabs and getting rid of it altogether. Along similar lines, consider distributing your content differently among the tabs. Maybe there's an alternative effective grouping, that lets you make the tabs more balanced? Do what websites ...


1

Here is my solution for such a problem. Edit one group at a time. When you need to add more members, click to load overlay window which lists everybody but also shows you who has been added to the group already.


1

You could use that shuttle design you mentioned but to get around the scrolling issue, include a search box on the left side above the members list. This way, if you know the names of the people you want to add, you just find their name, press Enter, and move on. If the users are already in groups, you could show those groups in the left side list and ...


1

Here are some resources about likert scales: In 1999 an interesting sequence of discussions regarding the use of the Likert scale appeared on the AERA Division D LIST SERV. Consider a scale such as: Agree Tend to agree Undecided Tend to disagree Disagree Dr. Dennis Roberts of Penn State, on August 30 1999, regarding the existence of the middle ...


1

Using a responsive layout that turned tabs into panes ended up being the nicest looking solution to this one. When the window would get large enough to support it, the most important tab would become a pane. Screenshot at small resolution: Screenshot at large resolution:


1

Given the cognitive load imposed on the user by the form above the tabs, I'd suggest the positioning of the form within the tab is the least of your worries. Before they get to the tab, the user has been forced to shift their focus back and forth across the entire width of the page several times. Aesthetically, my preference is for a top left alignment, ...


1

I don't think there's a "best" way. Personally I'd make them scale up to a certain size and (as you have done) anchor them at the top of the window. I'd be tempted to centre them - but top left is OK. I don't think people will be bothered by the empty space - especially if the tab is effectively a transient window. If you really don't want the large ...


1

I'm not sure this is what you are looking for, but it might point you in the right direction. http://uxmag.com/articles/framework-for-designing-for-multiple-devices. It suggests how to create a framework for designing for different screen sizes.


1

Um... How do you know what you've been ignored? By the fact they didn't immediately redesign their website following your email? :). Unfortunately it's a bit more complicated than that, especially since you say that it's a popular website (which usually implies that it's big, meaning that a redesign involves a huge amount of money, politics and work). ...


1

It's risky if you don't know by how much the site will scale following development. If you have a very clear indication of the IA and can be assured it won't develop that much then the risks are minimised. But, and speaking from personal experience, this approach can get very messy once you begin to introduce more levels than the design legislated for, ...


1

Use positive numbers only. A Likert scale gains nothing from the use of negative numbers. In fact, you are likely introducing a bias into your responses because the negative numbers will create an emotional response - driving users to selecting the most moderate of the positive responses (partially due to central tendency bias).



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