Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

There are a lot of designs/applications using same approach: Example 1 Example 2 Don't you think your first column is too empty? You can simplify the layout a bit combining both ideas (tree & switch) and use only one tree or simplified accordion. Simplified tree Accordion Finally, there is a way to make this approach a bit more flexible: ...


5

From my expirience I said yes. Beacause today the browser don't work like a text scaling but like zoom. The difference? Scrolling of course, specially horizontal scrolling and people with low vision problem don't like horizontal scrolling (or have serious usability problem with this kind of scrolling).. I can suggest you some articles. A list a part - an ...


5

The answer is to validate in each tier so that you always ensure data integrity. This protects you against the scenario where any of the prior tier validations were skipped. I can't stand when developers build methods that assume the data has already be validated. Let's take the following scenario where your tiers are: Client Server Service Database ...


2

If you're lucky enough to have a 2560x1440 screen and your desktop app looks odd even though you are already assigning the extra space to the controls that can make use of it, and there is no added value in making the presentation/input areas that big, then consider introducing an extra pane in those extreme situations. The content of this extra panel ...


2

Use the available space as well as possible, and never limit the size unless there is a very good reason to. Specifically, the primary content area of your application should scale to contain more content the larger the screen gets. This use case is also one of Microsoft's major drivers for the Ribbon interface; the Ribbon scales well so that it can take ...


2

IS there any benefit on having both client side and server side (ajax) form validations? From a UX perspective, the benefit is that it's faster for the user.


2

Nice question. I see a couple of ways of approaching this. Consider uniting the contents of this tab with one of the other tabs and getting rid of it altogether. Along similar lines, consider distributing your content differently among the tabs. Maybe there's an alternative effective grouping, that lets you make the tabs more balanced? Do what websites ...


1

Using a responsive layout that turned tabs into panes ended up being the nicest looking solution to this one. When the window would get large enough to support it, the most important tab would become a pane. Screenshot at small resolution: Screenshot at large resolution:


1

Given the cognitive load imposed on the user by the form above the tabs, I'd suggest the positioning of the form within the tab is the least of your worries. Before they get to the tab, the user has been forced to shift their focus back and forth across the entire width of the page several times. Aesthetically, my preference is for a top left alignment, ...


1

I don't think there's a "best" way. Personally I'd make them scale up to a certain size and (as you have done) anchor them at the top of the window. I'd be tempted to centre them - but top left is OK. I don't think people will be bothered by the empty space - especially if the tab is effectively a transient window. If you really don't want the large ...


1

I'm not sure this is what you are looking for, but it might point you in the right direction. http://uxmag.com/articles/framework-for-designing-for-multiple-devices. It suggests how to create a framework for designing for different screen sizes.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible