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1

Short answer: 99% of the time, it won't be a good UX. My choice would be to notify the user: Pasively when leaving the tab and Actively when leaving the page Unnecesary long answer: Why? Here some thoughts and recommendations that come to my mind: What does the user expect? You must think in what kind of programs the users of the ...


0

In short "Consistency and standards" / convention is a powerful heuristic. And data loss is a powerful motivator. The "manual save" was not the only UX choice. The Psion 5 was an interesting physical device, but the UX of it's software was possibly more notable as it chose to take an independent path to prevalent UI's of the time. One of the Psion's ...


0

First off, there is always something wrong in simply discarding changes (i.e. without notice). Secondly, preventing a user to switch tab unless they either save or loose change is not very good. If you have several tabs, it is to be able to switch from one to the other. Or you need to change the design so the tab being edited becomes the top element (e.g. ...


1

When I design a flow and structure I try my best to not put the user in a such a position to make the switch between two tabs within one operation / transaction / action / goal. If I put address into a tab I try to put a save button in the tab. If not I work in collapsible and / or one long screen depending on the technical capabilities, the medium, the ...


7

Tabs are meant to keep the state wether they are shown or not, meaning that the things you have in tab A should look exactly the same even if you switch to tab B and then back to A. Try to start to write an email in a tab using a web browser. Open another tab and then switch back to the mail composer tab. You would be surprised if what you had written in ...


38

It depends on your application structure, but in general tabs are precisely made to have more than one opened at a time. Therefore, it would be pretty annoying to always notify the user when he switches tabs. A common solution would be to keep the status of each tab and display a "modified" indicator inside the tab headline. E.g. in IntelliJ a modified ...


7

One should never irrevocably discard unsaved changes without warning the user. There are two possible solutions to this: When a user tries to change tabs, pop up a warning dialog that there are unsaved changes. Give them a choice to discard the changes or not at this point (there should be an option to continue and discard the changes, as well as an ...


22

The system should help the user but should not restrict the user. If the user indeed wants to search something, the user should be able to. Warning the user that this will result in losing information and afterwards giving the user the opportunity to copy his or her work (or maybe saving a concept version of it for later review?) should then be the best ...


0

I came here to read some other opinions on the topic. My personal opinion is that autosave is fine ONLY & ONLY IF it is backed up with undo feature. I remember once I had very negative experience in Google maps when I accidentally moved a pointer from one position to another. I tried to find undo button and at that moment app reports "Your changes were ...


0

Taking the Apple example, when I choose a new wallpaper I can actually see it applied in the background without having to think or find 'Apply' or 'Save' button. This is true if you make some change and see it reflected immediately. Can you see the news-feed update automatically as you add/modify the filters? If so, no notification necessary. The ...


1

A good great example is the Google Drive message: It updates automatically when the user changes everything on the document. It allows to the user to be informed about everything is happening on the background.


3

Yes, it most certainly does apply to web products. Whenever something in the backend is happening without the user's knowledge and they are waiting for it to happen, and they get no notice, that's when the frustration kicks in. When ever anything autosaves, take a look at what some applications do. A great example of this is Evernote. They don't have an ...



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