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40

...would the shop designer want shoppers to enter and walk as quickly as possible between shelves, or rather design the route so that shoppers are encouraged to stop, look, turn, discover... etc? Your analogy is flawed. Even if I walk slowly through a grocery store, my eyes are taking in thousands of pieces of information at a time. I have a ...


22

I would like to address this issue from two different perspectives: User experience and ethics. User Experience - From a UX point of view, slow load times = bad user experience. Users get irritated if they have to wait more than they think necessary. More than 10 secs, and the user will most probably lose all patience and leave. Jakob Nielsen studied this ...


19

At least one part of it is that stories sell. Andrew and Jenny, like many people in digital marketing, ran some sites on the side to get a little extra cash. They were sitting in the pub one day and chatting about how they were each doing. "I've just made the final payments on my car," beamed Andrew, "and it's all down to my side project". ...


10

I would say no. The slower a page is, the more efficiently I try to use it. That means that for a slow page I do little to no exploring. Once I realize that the page is annoyingly slow, then I will actively avoid clicking on things that seem interesting unless I it seems really really really, really, interesting. The faster the page is, the more ...


4

Overall I think that the effect from this will be negative for any sites in which the historical pricing is not a major factor (such as stock market websites). The sites for which it is useful are almost always targeted at professionals that (should) use objective criteria to evaluate whether to buy or not. When dealing with the general public, their ...


4

A slow UI = more time to receive each page --> will frustrate users and encourage them to find a faster site. [ 1 ] [ 2 ] If you want an "Ikea" experience, what you want is to add intermediate stages throughout which you offer users additional products. I have seen many e-commerce sites that do this. Here too you must make sure that the user doesn't get ...


3

I'm surprised no one has posted this article yet : http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2006/11/speed-still-matters.html The answer ? Bad idea. Any slowness, even the tinyest amount of delay bring down user satisfaction and with it, revenue. It's a very well written article by Jeff Atwood that talks about why speed matters on any website. Quote from the ...


2

There is this book, by Caroline Jarrett: "Forms that Work: Designing Web Forms for Usability (Interactive Technologies)". She communicates her experience of years working for the UK Gov. in the make of really long forms. Besides that, I can shred some ideas: Break the form in pages. Don't think long form=lots of scroll. Make each page sort of a section ...


2

Good UX is an uninterrupted, smooth engagement with the tool (software or not). If I understand your explanation correctly, a notification is something that informs the users of a new version or a product by the same producer in a rather intrusive way (be it a modal pop-up or a message in the notification area). Such a method of selling is generally ...


2

For this sort of products, long content is more persuasive than a shorter one: the more you write, the more is can fool the reader into thinking that the product is authentic, UX-wise. When JQuery developers want to attract customers (users), they don't need to talk too much in order to convince the users. This is why JQuery website is short: a simple ...


1

Response time is not the same as effectiveness to task or user satisfaction. For e-commerce, designing accurately to the task is more important, I would say. This is a little old, but Jared Spool ran tests on this a while back: http://www.uie.com/events/roadshow/articles/download_time/ Fast(er) loading pages won't help if those pages don't take users ...


1

Answer: no. As far as the IKEA concept is concerned: They do not try to slow you down. They try to make you follow their route so that you are forced to look at everything. The reason why you buy stuff you didn't need is not only a consequence of that. It's foremost the way they market their stuff along that designated path. In fact, research (*) shows ...



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