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19

There are three groups of Office users: Casual, or Know-nothing Users. This is your mom trying to type a recipe in Word, or your dad trying to make a list in Excel. These are the people who have no idea how to format tabs, they just hit the spacebar until the cursor is in about the right place. For these people, the Ribbon UI is a godsend, since they don't ...


16

Well, except for the amount of space used, I found it more user-friendly than the classical menu bar. There are many reasons for this: Images: Icons are bigger than on classical menu and toolbar, making it easier to understand for newcomers. Previsualisation: Nearly all the actions that affect the layout can be previewed without leaving the ribbon, making ...


11

The ribbon was designed for programs with a lot of commands, CRUD application tend to have just a few commands so maybe the ribbon is not the right UI to begin with. You can do what MS did when they designed the ribbon, take as many people as you can (that know the field, preferably customers) give then a list of tabs/groups and a few command and let them ...


9

Keyboard-related usability issues with the Ribbon The ribbon is great for the discoverability of mouse access to features. However, in my experience, that same user experience isn't really there for when it comes to keyboard access. The main problems are that Office 2003 keyboard shortcuts are no longer discoverable, and the new Office 2007 "Alt key" ...


7

I've got the following probelms with the ribbon bar: It takes up an immense amount of space which on a small screened laptop can actually be really irritating. You can however hide the ribbon bar, but the means to do this is not obvious. There is no way to revert to a "Classic view", I've spent quite some time looking for features which I knew exactly ...


6

Quoting from Microsoft website: Instead of uniform sizing, commands are sized relative to their frequency of use and importance. In addition to making the most frequently used commands easier to find and click, it also makes them more touchable. That last word 'touchable' links to a page which describes various characteristics of the Microsoft touch ...


6

Nice question. A concept to base some research on for this issue is "kinesthetic memory". Basically, the memory that your body has to complete tasks (such as playing the guitar without looking at the strings, touch-typing etc). I've had a quick look around the web for useful articles, and here's an example. ...


6

Martin Dostál conducted a study of the Ribbon interface focused on evaluating user acceptance of the new mechanism. He surveyed 117 participants of varying demographics and experience with computers and office software with the following hypothesis: Our hypotheses were as follows: H1 Ribbon user interface is received better by younger people. ...


5

It seems like the different options are more related with each other than that they are unrelated. They all manage "tree operation". In that sense it would make a lot of sense to combine them on just 1 tab. It would take away the need for users to constantly switch between the tabs. The fact that you have plenty of screen real estate left is also an ...


4

Ribbon A ribbon by definition is a bunch of menus placed on tabs. Because the tabs “stick” after being selected, it makes most sense when you can divide your commands at the top level into discrete tasks, where you expect users to execute multiple commands on a single tab without needing a command on another tab. In practice, this is rarely how things work ...


3

I think you're confusing advanced with complicated. I would say that the most advanced app is the one that gets the job done as easily as possible, with the fewest steps, in the most intuitive way. When you look at it like that, there are many very advanced touch applications. Compare the mail app on the iPhone to Outlook. I think the mail app is more ...


3

I'm in almost the same situation that you are with my application and designing a "Ribbon" interface. I've contemplated a situation where I group commands in the ribbon based upon the core "business" object. In other words, if my app allowed users to manage Clients and Vendors would it make sense to have a ribbon group dedicated to Clients, with all of the ...


3

For starters, I recommend reviewing the official Ribbons guidelines. In general, though, I think the intent of the ribbon is for use as a space to expose commands, not for things like confirmation data.


3

This would be a menu. The image would specifically be a an Options Menu. From there it get's less specific and more descriptive. You could call it a Modal Options Menu or a SlideUp Menu for something that incorporates a description of the accompanied animation. As far as I know, there is no standardized word or label.


2

I think it has promise - it has the beginnings of a decent UI - but it's not there yet. One thing I find particularly annoying is having to constantly flip between different views for two different functions. I've had the most trouble with this in a non-MS app called SmartDraw, but if that's an indication of how other companies are going to use it, we're in ...


2

I've been thinking about this too, and the main idea I've come up with is similar to what Tim Lentine described: having a tab for each of my main business objects. I'd put the most commonly performed commands for that object in the tab for it, for example and "Order" object might have a commands to change status (eg cancel, ship, etc), bill, send invoice, ...


2

Looks like Micrsoft is putting it below the ribbon bar, as seen in the screenshot for Windows 8 file explorer described in the msdn blog. They also have some other components included with the search bar, sich as the forward/back buttons and the location control.


2

Another aspect to consider separate to productivity Is there a legal requirement for you to ensure your software can work without a mouse? The answer to this will depend on where you are in the world, and what legal jurisdiction the business running the software is under. For example, Im in New Zealand. If this software was for members of the public to ...


2

I know that this thread was from a lot of years ago, but I was feeling in an irritable mood after yet again having to click-click-click my way just to change to a new window in Excel. (And Alt-Tab is not a solution; I have a LOT of windows open constantly and having to shuffle through every window of every application that I have open is nowhere near as ...


2

AutoCad 2009 and up uses a ribbon for its multiple document windows. From what I've understood (I haven't actually worked in the program myself) it is used as more of a menu, but the ordering is a couple of hundred times (one user's opinion) better than the menus. And as you can see in the picture below, there's a second level of categories, like in Word but ...


2

Microsoft focuses on productivity, which is why the ribbon was introduced in 2007 version. Insted of using a popup window they let the user focus on content instead: Contextualization reduces the number of commands a user must evaluate at any given time. Most of the commands in a program are object-based. By showing these commands only when an object is ...


2

Depend in the input required, in the output and in the user that will use it. However, the usual trick is to split in different level, so no matter how complicate is the screen, you can split in different screen that are easy to understand. The trick is to be consistent. For example, we want to configure advanced wifi properties. iOS setting : Wi-Fi ...



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