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0

I think it's not good to scale up, but a nice thing to do is ex. making a website background be prepared for such a big screens. It is also a good reason (that empty space) to keep some hidden functionalities on screen such as facebook's chat.


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Is this a good practice?, NO! As you said in "older website", web design in general has changed over the years and designers are now focusing on usability and accessibility. Those extra spaces makes your content more readable. Take a look at this: Useful Usability Findings and Guidelines


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In my personal opinion, it is not a good idea to populate the whole big screen with more content as it would strain the user's eyes and neck having to see from one corner of the screen to the other. So, its crucial to kind of limit the focus of user to a certain area of the screen. Of course, to populate the empty space of the screen, you could employ ...


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The whole point of responsive design is that you don't start to design from the width of your page. The idea of responsive design is that you start design from the components up. Think about what content you want to display, and then design a scaling system. Something that expands and shrinks along with the width of the screen. Responsive sites do not ...


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WHOA WHOA WHOA?!? 1100px is not the answer!!! Responsive means that it responds to a screen up to commercial maximum. 1100px is not the commercial maximum. You might want to reread some of the information that people took the time to give you. A responsive website will be designed for any width of any device.. This is why it frustrates me that people got ...


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960px is a good base width because tablet viewers (in landscape) can still see the whole site as you designed it. You just have to plan. Yes, a responsive website is based on percentages, but if you set your sidebar to, say, 25% of the page width, then it will be super narrow on a phone or smaller tablet. Best to set fixed pixel widths for sidebars, then ...


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A little late to the party but I'm developing a project with a designer who is absolutely in love with modals. For mobile devices in 2014, modals are still a poor UX choice because of positioning and scrolling issues. They are most often JavaScript driven, which means if accessibility is important to your project then there will be a cross section of site ...


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For long forms, portrait is preferred, because: More form is visible in portrait mode than landscape. More fields are visible in portrait mode with on-screen keyboard on. Easy to hold and type while doing data entry. Once we had a similar problem, and after a research, we came to this conclusion that, for bigger data entry forms, using portrait is better ...


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Quick note, 'Shopping Cart' it typically two words. So you actually are dealing with 3 words. I think you reducing the size is fine, but... ...keep in mind that word wrapping is not something that should be a focus. The web is flexible. That's one of the great things about it. And part of that flexibility is not having 100% control over typography. ...


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You could simply replace the word with the shopping icon. It simply becomes a symbol for the words you want in that space and is more of a universal graphic to convey the same information. On smaller screens your options are either making your text smaller (which can hamper legibility depending on the font especially) versus the layout you want.


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The situation, as stated before, is complex, but there are a few solutions that may work depending on the decision maker and users. Right now it seems that you are tied by the decision maker and not the users, although I may be wrong. Show all columns but with a reduced width, so all of the fit on the screen, then add a visible and notorious text right ...


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I don't think this is very easy when it comes to design for limited screen estate. Is there a reason to have it all show at once? You may be inundating the user with too much raw data. You could allow the user to choose what they wish to focus on by: allowing "freeze frames" functionality or just freeze the ones that makes sense. This maintains user ...


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In a responsive mindset, you definitely need to favor flexibility over precise control. Especially in your case since you don't seem to be able to predict the number of images in your grid. In my opinion, your current breakpoints work really well. A good way to improve the feeling of that “widow” image would be to set your gallery container to text-align: ...


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I think the dual dropdown menus may be a little confusing, since they appear to be conditional or part of the same form action (i.e. selection from first dropdown changes what's available in second dropdown, or any number of other assumptions). Would you consider moving the 3 sub-page links into your mobile navigation? It's very common to see sub-navigation ...


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Placing hamburger icon and back button on the left side of the header in iOS make sense when you want to group all navigation functions in one place. On the right side of the header there are displayed other functions like editing or filtering. Suppose that user on one screen could: go back, see all menu categories (hamburger icon), search and filter ...


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On the one hand, controls on the bottom right are easier to target with the right thumb. On the other hand, hamburger buttons, also known as off-canvas menus, are conventionally positioned in the upper left. So the question is, "Which is more important, ease of targeting or cultural convention?" Let's see what Don Norman has to say: "A convention is a ...



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