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Not at all. Not even in Bootstrap, not anywhere. Responsive is responsive, your sizes and boundaries will depend on your needs and project, nothing else. 1170px is a popular size because Bootstrap is the most widely used framework and it uses that size, but it can be replaced with anything you want. Technology changes everyday, and 1170px was chosen as a ...


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Yes. Responsive means it adapts to fit all screen sizes. Generally the worry with responsive design is at the small end of the scale, with getting things to work on mobile and tablets, however there is no upper limit. Typically due to finite resources, many people do tend to design their biggest size at around 1170- this is perfect for the most common ...


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An additional point that may well be worth noting is that if the user is using a text only browser or possibly a mobile browser with very limited bandwidth they may well get the link that they need to click, especially if the author has been consistent on using the alt= on images that are also links, to go to the actual final page that they are looking for ...


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There is research out there showing that people are more likely to click a button labeled "Menu" rather than a hamburger icon, but that says little about their motivation. ("Menu" is a relatively vague term, whereas a hamburger is slowly becoming a standard symbol for a specific kind of menu: a top-level navigation menu.) Norman and Nielsen advocate labeling ...


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Browsers take a very simple approach to loading web pages; they start at the top of the html document and they work their way down to the bottom, that's it. The intention is to not make you wait for anything. As soon as a browser has read the document it will try and display it, trying to provide the content of the document to you as fast as it possibly ...


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Technically this is caused by the fact that images and other assets are generally hosted separately, and the browser only knows to go fetch them when the document uses them. It would be technically possible to delay displaying anything to the user until all the assets were ready (a lot of old-school Flash sites did this for instance, with a loading screen ...


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If I'm understanding correctly, I think the question should be "Why sites loads websites gradually?" . See to answer your strict question, browsers do whatever you (where you is the developer, site owner, etc) tell them to do. There's no magic, if you tell the browser "do A, then B, then C" that's exactly what the browser will do. However, if the question ...


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"Loading" screens, progress bars, spinners, or the like are necessary for operations which take enough time that the user needs reassurance that the program hasn't crashed or become unresponsive. For shorter-duration operations, a spinner or loading screen can actually increase the perceived duration (if not the actual duration) of the delay. There has ...


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There are guidelines about keeping your user adequately informed about system response and delays: Response Times: The 3 important Limits by Jakob Nielsen This article was originally written in 1993 but was updated in 2014. The basic advice regarding response times has been about the same for thirty years [Miller 1968; Card et al. 1991]: 0.1 ...


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After going through your dashboard(created account), i liked it overall. But the arrows are little confusing. You have used arrows for three different views. For Drop-down Calendar(Widget) Next & Prev Right Arrow just for mark of tab/tile title. It would be better if you can solve this. What i would prefer is as below: And the other look as ...


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On this website it gives some info about screen resolutions http://www.websitedimensions.com/ According to that stats the smallest mobile resolution is 320px - however as mentioned in the third table, the actual width(excluding browser's interface) in that case can be 310px in case of the link expires in the future, here is web archive link: http://web....


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Two usable options come to mind. 1. Accordion menus 2. Sliding panels


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I create a little prototype to deal with this situation on devices with little space. You can find it here http://5rsg1w.axshare.com/ First you show your users a Menu-Button Then the first level navigation apear After clicking on one of the link the user will see the second navigation Then the user can click on the link 1 or on one link of the second level ...


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Can you elaborate more ? Are you seeking an answer from user-experience/programming perspective ? If programming, then you should search for three column layout design such as This or This Additionally, if you really want to see more creative and clean design of the sidebar while learning how to structure your web application and other great ...


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Density-independent Pixels Sounds like what you're looking for is Density-independent Pixels. Even though you might be working in @2x sizes, the final result is the same. The code will remain Font-size: 24px; on desktop and mobile. The higher density screens require specific solutions for visual elements such as images and icons, but not for the basic ...


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To answer your question: Short answer - No. Longer answer - No, but would it help development if you provided more guidance? Not only will it probably help the team if you define some basic stylistic ground rules (do you even have a style guide?), and it will give you a sense of scale about how it looks and how it works. As a designer you need to have a ...


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I try to follow a strict pattern using only pixels, percentages or em's, but it aways gets messy, so we end up using a mix of them. But thats not a big problem. So just go do your work.


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I hope this answer this question, but this is my personal process: I use the font sizes in my PSD mockups for reference purposes only, almost as a 'relative' size. Then after Design is approved, along with the assets, I create a separate html / CSS basic file as a style guide (a bit like a style tile) where I define the real size for all fonts and see how ...


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Lea, instead of low contrast for the first and last tab, you can hide arrows. just my 2 cent, https://au.pinterest.com/pin/180284791312274083/ instead of showing complete tab, I hide half the first and last 'navigation tab' so that user can understand/curious there are more links. It is not a big issue, but just sharing an option. (*sorry for the link, i've ...


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Something that is commonly done is that if you want to use tabs, have it scale responsively down to a certain break point and then make the tabs become an accordion menu. For example for mobile and tablet it would be an accordion menu and then above 768px it would break out and become an enlarged tab menu.


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Thanks to a colleague at work I've finally found a solution : The source link : https://material.angularjs.org/latest/demo/tabs


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Congratulations - you have discovered one of the major challenges with Tabs :-) One part of the challenge is based on how you construct the Tab (I am assuming this is HTML), e.g. if you use CSS to set the width of the tab you will have problems (it is better not to set a width and let the container adopt its width based on its text content). If you are ...


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Most of the websites probably choose a horizontal header because it is commonly considered that this visual organization of website elements is more consistent with human perception. However, an outside the norm approach, when used correctly, can become a memorable experience, thanks to its rare occurence. It is not important if the navigation menu is a ...


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Consider these 2 thoughts: A) Many users will have a wide screen monitor. So for them the horizontal space is not really an issue. Instead the vertical space is where the premium is at. B) Secondly, your side menu can easily collapse or slide in/out, thus effectively saving you the horizontal space you are concerned about.



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