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Why not just split your navigation area (like the header) in half. Left-align one brand, right-align the other brand, and have the navigation effects appear when you click on the brand's png/logo. [supersweet-cookies] <click for menu click for menu>[deliciousdank cookies] [ ...


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To stay in scope I'm going to assume that you must use a tabular form (i.e. decomposing the data into cards, lists, or subviews is not an option). Tables will never really be fully responsive friendly, but that doesn't mean they shouldn't be used at all. Sometimes it's a design constraint you have to work with and so it's not helpful to say "don't use ...


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Nice question. I think there is no "best practice" here because it really depends on what your wireframing objectives are (e.g. high fidelity vs low fidelity, proof of concept vs specific interaction design, etc). But if it helps, here is how I wireframe responsive websites: I use wireframes for very rapid, iterative UX design. So speed and iterability ...


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Your breakpoints should be defined by your content and your content only. Take each element case by case and decide based on ease of content consumption at what point it should break into some other layout configuration. It's a mistake to silo everything on a site into predetermined screen widths as you'll end up individual elements which are little bit ...


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The key thing is to retain 100% of the sites meaning while reducing the size of the screen. The device used to browse your site should not dictate the contained meaning. For text this means that it isn't ever removed. Even if it is hidden (think of a menu put into a hamburger for example) it should still exist in an accessible way in the HTML, either for a ...


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Context is everything. Maybe it matters, maybe it doesn't. The fact that it's a portfolio site has no real bearing in and of itself. Generically speaking, should you retain the hamburger menu on larger screens? Traditionally we haven't. But it's becoming an increasingly popular option. Some sites that retain the hamburger menu even on large screens: ...


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The hamburger menu... I'm torn. The hamburger menu decreases discoverability because it hides what the user is more than likely going to use to... well... discover At a glance, the user can tell what's where and how to find what they are looking for. Being hidden underneath someplace isn't ideal for scanability. Having said that, stay away from keeping it ...


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I agree with the answer and comments above, it's like UX 101 and I won't argue with that but... let me add a different view to consider. You say this is for a portfolio. Portfolios are meant to display your work, but also who you are. It's a way to tell the world "Hey, I'm me. And additionally, I can do all of this!". Personally, I know what are the basics ...


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Scrolling isn't necessarily a bad thing. In fact people read text on a scrolling page faster than multi-page document. If you only have 13 items on the list, this is only like 2 screen height of scrolling, a lot of mobile pages out there are way lengthier. I wouldn't be terribly concern on that front. 13 items are quite a lot for somebody to take in at once ...


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An animation when opening the menu probably likely won't negatively affect the usability much (the user still knows where to click the menu and expects a menu to open). An animation does add some "delight" to the experience because it makes the transition visually smooth and it helps the user follow along with what they selected. That said, if you are ...


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You can also consider using something like The Columns Project It enables mobile-friendly formatting/styling of HTML tables instantly, but it require you to upload a CSV file though.


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Create focus The trouble with tables is that there's no focus. No hierarchy. Just a whole bunch of data to be crunched. They have their place, but the use cases are nowhere near as numerous as their usage. Cards The dominant pattern to solve this today has it's very own buzz word: "cards". There's nothing new about the pattern, but it works well in a ...


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Responsive = alter for context A proper responsive design (one that has endured a rigorous UX process) manipulates page content based on a user's anticipated context. That's difficult to evaluate because you can no longer just do device detection (too many!) so you lean on viewport as an indicator. But you can tell a lot from that number. Whether you ...


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Your question seems to be digging for implementation tips. I can't code your table, but I can speak to UX ... and isn't that why we're here? Tables are tables Unless you're talking about editable spreadsheets (which your question doesn't currently specify), there isn't a big difference in tabular data on GUI vs touch interface. Obviously a narrow screen ...



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