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2

I'd first question whether you need global navigation on mobile. I'm often asked to implement global navigation on projects because project leads have a belief that users want to 'hand out' in the application and be able to navigate from one point to any other point. But in terms of actual usage, that's not now most people interact with most ...


18

Had to deal w/a similar issue last year. Our task, which we couldn't change, was to convert an 11-section, 120-question "learning style" survey PDF into an interactive quiz. The original PDF is a daunting 10-pg list of questions & checkboxes, much like your example, which no student really wants to complete. Our solution was to break it up by ...


7

Shorter survey will equal more completions. Since shortening the length is out of your influence, the following considerations will make it more likely to be completed. they are predicated on BJ Fogg's Behavior model. The formula is B= MAT. Behavior is a result of Motivation,ability and the trigger. Present the trigger to people in the right state of ...


4

Radio buttons are perfect for asking a question with 1 and only 1 answer. I can assure you, however, that with each radio button click the user will hate you exponentially more and more so anything you can do to reduce clicks is the way to go. Ways to reduce user clicks... If you can reduce the number of options from 5 to 3 that will help. For example: ...


0

Simplify the potential responses so they take less thinking. At least this way if you can't reduce the length you do reduce the amount of effort required to complete it: Recommend the Instructor to a Friend - Yes / No


8

I think the length is the problem. A survey with 150 questions is simply not going to be user-friendly, no matter how you dress it up. You are asking far too much of your users. Also, a survey of this length is almost never necessary, nor is it even likely to be beneficial. Are there really 150 unique items you need to capture? Probably not. Most ...


3

You're on the right track and you're close to solving the problem - you need to make the users WANT to continue answering questions. What incentives do you have for your users? Money / Discounts to goods and services? Rewards, such as participating in a community? The gamification aspect has to come first. Organizing the questions into convenient bite size ...


1

It depends. In general long forms where long = lots of form fields is a bad idea and should be avoided. Splitting a form into separate pages may help in that situation. But in your case, you're using the term long to refer to vertical height of the page. Remember that people are just fine scrolling--ESPECIALLY on touch devices. As such, I see no benefit ...


0

A/B testing and Usability testing will give you the correct answer. Forms are super tricky. I am dealing with a huge/unfortunately necessary long form and I've realised A/B testing and Usability testing is the only way to find out.


0

You should consider doing some user testing on two designs: one like this and one with steps. You could get valuable feedback from testing multiple designs. If you split the form up, your sections should be very clear and distinct. In looking at your form, I can't clearly distinguish different sections. There's an "about your project"... but what category ...


0

I consider that is better to divide the screen in two steps or three, this is a very important for our users to navigate to the app. If they bored, simply they go back or close the site because the UX isn't the better. You take a look some mobile apps and inspire you in how design a web mobile app. For example, in the facebook's apps wizard we have various ...


0

If I'm on a mobile device, and 0% of your site is responsive, that's a detriment to the entire experience. If 20% (your new features) are responsive, at least 20% of your site is now easier to use. Granted, that likely now makes the 80% that isn't responsive that much more frustrating in comparison--but maybe that's a good thing as it will push your ...


0

As Evil Closet Monkey said, it doesn't make sense that the hamburger icon is being used on a desktop version of the site. If you're using a responsive framework, like Bootstrap or Foundation, they should automatically adjust the menu style depending on screen size like the picture below. If you look at this article where I grabbed the image, you'll see ...


4

You have a few options. I like the responsive "where am i?" breadcrumbs as demonstrated here. This option has the full breadcrumb trail in large windows and shrinks to only show custom text (such as "Where am I?") in narrow windows and on mobile devices. Example: Full screen: Home > Section 1 > Section Title That is Longer Becomes: Where Am I? ...


0

Case 1:- Grid with few rows (<10) Show radio buttons always instead of combo(repetition is not a big deal with few rows). Case 2:- Grid with several rows (>10) Show radio buttons on mouseover only(to avoid repetition), otherwise by default show selected action in that column. Combo is not a good choice for following reasons:- Need to click ...


0

If the number of selection options (Yes, No & Undecided) are the only ones or to the max if the options increase to 5 the following approach is feasible. Herein you want such a control in a grid and that too for every row wherein numerous other controls and values will be displayed. In such a scenario using a "Drop-down" for the same will be an ideal ...


0

If you're planning on creating mobile apps down the line anyway, I think it makes sense to start with the responsive site. The native apps are nice, but SOME people would still go to the website from a mobile device.Option 2 just makes things harder for them. (Even if they do find and install the native apps eventually)


0

It's impossible for us to answer this for you. You have to decide. The big question here, it seems, is what is gained by creating native apps for the platforms? This is a common strategy (build a web site, then apps) but I'm not convinced it's a strategy based on data in most cases. You need to ask questions like the following: What will compel a user ...


0

If you're weighing Make a single responsive website Make a single non-responsive website and an Android app and a iPhone app It seems to me like you're comparing apples to orangutans. Websites and apps are very different animals. Websites are accessible by clicking on a link (low commitment) and apps need to be installed (high commitment). Websites are ...


2

It honestly depends on the user. Their are pros and cons to each strategy. With an app, your users are going to have to take the extra step to go to their respective app store, download the app, then launch it and do the set up again (if there is any). However native apps tend to run more smoothly than a responsive site as a responsive site will most likely ...


0

Other than being a single developer, what is your situation? Who is your audience? What technology do you expect they will primarily use? Does your product have features that are more user friendly with an app? That being said, I would likely lean towards a responsive website, but don't know for without truly knowing your situation (and surely wouldn't ...



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