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Thanks for the above inputs, both have a good 'quick' ideas to fix this but its not quite right. I'm sorry but I forgot to mention that this is not a web based app.. its actually a desktop Electronic Document System on Windows OS therefore I cannot just expand Vertically and add vertical scrolling. My not-very-final idea is to add some type of Carousel ...


0

Since you have the limitations of not being able to fully hide any of the boxes and not being able to resize the boxes I only really see two options. 1. Make two rows Just add a second row below the row you current have. Pro: shows all the same details as your current solution Cons: pushes all the other content further down the page 2. Thumbnail and ...


0

If its not possible its not possible, also feel free to push back if you think it isnt a great idea. It sounds like you need to prioritize the importance of each box Heres some options. Throw the other 3 boxes underneath. I would only do this if all of the boxes have the same level of importance and are used just as often. If you think it isnt wise have ...


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In my current company we design for three breakpoints: Smart Phone, Tablet, and Desktop. You don't have to design for every single screen out there. Taking into account the most common ones should suffice. That said, special circumstances or requirements might require you to do more than that. However, in a consumer app, the three breakpoints cover most of ...


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Three, usually defined in the project brief. Desktop, tablet, mobile, at 1024px, 768px, and 320px. Not sure what Bootstrap has to do with it.


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What I've been doing professionally is a mobile and desktop design. I will do whatever pages are requested (typically homepage, landing page, and any special pages) Then I will figure out the in-between breakpoints as I develop the site. I find this saves me time to spin the project up, as well as, it addresses the issue that sometimes things "break" at ...


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About the UX: Keep it consistent. If a user is viewing the desktop version on a macbook it should be the same experience as on an iMac or larger display. If you're on a larger display, look at this site for some inspiration about the navigation drawer. https://www.google.com/design/spec/material-design/introduction.html Also, keep in mind, pinch to zoom ...


2

I would invoke the UX classic 'Fitts's Law' here. While not the perfect rule in situations like this, it is a good concept to consider. Basically - it'll take the user longer to get the cursor over to the menu, and longer to notice the page has been updated having selected an option the further the menu is from the main content (where they are likely ...


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Why do designers do this? Concealing information in this manner helps designers display content in a way that's manageable and complies with relevant theories on how users seek/consume content. Is it good UX? Yes, see: Information scent Studies show that users will continue to search (read: click through) for information that is more rewarding than it is ...


0

Another reason for a Read More button is to allow the site to show an advert within the body of the article without creating a "false floor", which may lead users on mobile devices to erroneously believe the article to have ended. http://www.nngroup.com/articles/ad-placement-mobile/


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So the chosen answer, while good, is incorrect as regards this particular screenshot. I am actually responsible for implementing the button in the screen shot. I can't speak for every site but I can say that the thought process (as far as I know) is basically the 3rd option given by tohster. QZ only shows the read full button when you navigate directly to ...


1

you need a different approach here. The user is probably only interested in exceptions (red, orange, blue?) so you should render the display differently. I would advocate having a simple traffic light screen with each colour having a number beside it green (14), orange (3), red (2), blue (1). On click user goes to listing of all the issues of that ...


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One thing I like to always do, is looking at if from the other way around and simply go mobile-first, so it definitly makes sense to try and do this exercise. The limitation of mobile phones lets you focus on the really important parts. When going to a tablet or desktop you'll notice that adding stuff is much easier than removing stuff. For the tables, I'd ...


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There are a few reasons: Robot defense. Content sites (e.g. news sites) sometimes use these buttons to provide a rudimentary defense against content scrapers. By showing only part of the content they prevent scrapers from loading the page and parsing the article. This is obviously very crude, but it is still effective. Affirmation of user intent. ...


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Quite the opposite, there are several good reasons to do it. Take a look to this article (I don't fully agree with all of it, but you'll get the gist of it) They are important for several reasons, most importantly because they allow designers to compress content on the home page. By compressing content, you fit more content in less space. This means ...


1

I think one of the rules of thumb here is: "throw away half of the content, than, throw away half of what's left". It basically boils down to simply trying to get to the essence of your content. Try to see how other sites make a concise call to action, give bits of information, ... As quoted many times, users don't read, they scan. Even the resulting ...


0

I have purchased themes and worked on an app before. The issue is themes comes with heavy css and other supporting files. Many of these style we wont be even using in our app still we are forcing the user download all the supporting files. Refactoring this is a hell of a job. Loading all these files in mobile having a slow network is bad experience. So use ...


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The theme itself shouldn't impact performance that much, unless you're using drastically more fancyness (alphatransparency, animated state changes) in the responsive style than in the mobile one. The biggest speed issue you'll have might be image size. This depends on what you're building towards, of course, but a fullscreen mobile photo can get away with ...


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Use something like webpagetest to see how much faster. Speed does help online sales I remember hearing at a conference that Walmart found for every 100 ms they shaved off their page load time they saw a 1% increase in online sales. Me personally my thought is to go with the responsive to not alienate tablet users unless the performance difference is night ...


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I think this is something that should be deprioritized. It's definitely a nice-to-have, but you have to way it against other variables: how may users resize their browsers drastically on a desktop? of those users, how many are truly confused by the reflowed layout? how much time and money will it take to add these transitions? Will this affect time and ...


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My short answer is yes, but it is not something you should stress to much over. While most users will have the screen maximised on their device (be it 4k, 1080p, 1024x768 or 320x480 resolutions) there is a chance that they will not have the browser maximised (although this is likely to only happen on a desktop computer). Unfortunately you can't also rely ...


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Most users don’t resize their windows that often. So: a definite No, there is no need to fiddle with all this animations. But: Some users do. So, some animations might be of help — drastic changes (like disappearing or complete different navigation) could (and should) be accompanied by an animation. The animation has the only purpose to help orientation, ...


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I think the first thing to do is find out if your users actually resize windows. As designers and nerds, we tend to try this out to evaluate responsive design, but many users do not. This isn't to say that "normal" users (or your users) don't use multiple browser sizes, they just might use fullscreen/half screen versions only, or something like that. The ...



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