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18

Had to deal w/a similar issue last year. Our task, which we couldn't change, was to convert an 11-section, 120-question "learning style" survey PDF into an interactive quiz. The original PDF is a daunting 10-pg list of questions & checkboxes, much like your example, which no student really wants to complete. Our solution was to break it up by ...


11

Paddi MacDonnell wrote an interesting article on the hamburger menu and related mobile-first approaches to design a few days ago: It outlines some of the problems of hamburger menus, and concludes with the observation that the device is something of a way to brush the navigation of a complex app under the carpet of the hamburger icon (my carpet analogy, not ...


8

I think the length is the problem. A survey with 150 questions is simply not going to be user-friendly, no matter how you dress it up. You are asking far too much of your users. Also, a survey of this length is almost never necessary, nor is it even likely to be beneficial. Are there really 150 unique items you need to capture? Probably not. Most ...


7

Every example you gave would work. One might work better within your design than the other. Your users won't really care about the way the search input pops up. The best search fields are bug free are easy in use give relevant results help users find what they are looking for (auto fill or alternatives) So I would focus more on functionality and less on ...


7

Shorter survey will equal more completions. Since shortening the length is out of your influence, the following considerations will make it more likely to be completed. they are predicated on BJ Fogg's Behavior model. The formula is B= MAT. Behavior is a result of Motivation,ability and the trigger. Present the trigger to people in the right state of ...


5

Content First One of the biggest things to consider is what can stay and what can be removed or adjusted, at each breakpoint. Smashing Magazine was the first to take the approach of leaving behind (fully hiding) some ads when it doesn't fit into the breakpoint. With the mobile first strategy, Content is King. Most ads are sold on a Cost-Per-Click or ...


5

Let me provide you with insight of Multichannel as its just an antonym to the Cross-Channel term. Multi-channel is a way of delivering services that allows users / customers to interact with the system through a number of different channels and enables successful completion of tasks through any number of these in complete and discrete fashion. The typical ...


5

Some options to consider: Offer up a 'sneak preview'. Let people see the new version long before it's forced upon them. Listen to feedback as much as you can. Amazon does this prior to their redesigns. Launch the new version but don't force it upon them immediately. Let people opt in/out of the new design for a period of time. Google's web apps often do ...


5

You have a few options. I like the responsive "where am i?" breadcrumbs as demonstrated here. This option has the full breadcrumb trail in large windows and shrinks to only show custom text (such as "Where am I?") in narrow windows and on mobile devices. Example: Full screen: Home > Section 1 > Section Title That is Longer Becomes: Where Am I? ...


4

Radio buttons are perfect for asking a question with 1 and only 1 answer. I can assure you, however, that with each radio button click the user will hate you exponentially more and more so anything you can do to reduce clicks is the way to go. Ways to reduce user clicks... If you can reduce the number of options from 5 to 3 that will help. For example: ...


3

You can use a numeric stepper. The user may enter the value with the keyboard, or use the up/down arrows. The default value should be empty (no distance filter). EDIT : See comment by @FodderZone download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

When referring to responsive web projects, I assume that it is in reference to designing for different channels of access for the user. This could be in terms of the device and viewport that the designer needs to cater for. When referring to cross-channel web projects, I take this to mean either one of two things: Projects that involve adaptive or ...


3

Considering the first part of the question, Mobile First Approach is not a constraint. It's an opportunity for designers to determine the MOST CRITICAL use case of a product. As we get only a limited real-estate to work on, we need to prioritise the use cases. Second, you need to convince your client that It's not users who have to conform to their ...


3

I believe you've already answered, partly, your own question. Looking into web analytics we can see patterns of actions that stick together and which features are used the most. That said it's important to ensure that options that may not be as popular can still be serviced to users who may require them. Taking an existing web application and ...


3

I think you may have a misconception of who mobile zoom works with media queries, correct me if I am wrong. To indicate that a site is mobile friendly and responsive, there is usually a tag something like this included in the <head> of the html: <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1"> This essentially says that the ...


3

You're on the right track and you're close to solving the problem - you need to make the users WANT to continue answering questions. What incentives do you have for your users? Money / Discounts to goods and services? Rewards, such as participating in a community? The gamification aspect has to come first. Organizing the questions into convenient bite size ...


3

The key thing is to retain 100% of the sites meaning while reducing the size of the screen. The device used to browse your site should not dictate the contained meaning. For text this means that it isn't ever removed. Even if it is hidden (think of a menu put into a hamburger for example) it should still exist in an accessible way in the HTML, either for a ...


3

How about "Fixed width (original size)" and "Match my screen width"? Since your audience is 40+ and not really tech-savvy, they probably aren't going to know what "Adaptive size" is.


3

First of all - not ABCD... but autocomplete in search (consider Cyrillic, Greek or other alphabets). Drag-n-drop is a beautiful feauter, but consider dragging aprox. 50 elements. I will be extremely time consuming. Clicking on item on the left to assign it to group will be much easier. For mobile my proposition is to switch view between Available <-> ...


3

It doesn't need to be a modal or a new window, you can use the footnote model - just allocate a special panel at the bottom of your screen for these annotations, and make sure to distinguish them visually from regular links. So when a user taps an annotated word, the panel would come up at the bottom and display the definition. On tap elsewhere on the screen ...


2

Even if it's an obvious answer to this question, it is still important. Apart from the target audience answer to this question, which is also an answer, I'd go with the more future safe one. The website don't have to be responsive in every aspect. A mobile friendly website is very important though. You need to make sure mobile users have a good experience ...


2

As others have said the differences are small, but there are a few details to make sure you get right: If any content is covered (options 2 and 3), there needs to be a clear, simple way to get rid of the covering, for if someone hit the search icon by mistake or changed their mind for any reason. This might be a point in favour of options 1 or 2: with 2, ...


2

I think a slider that has stepped values should work reasonably well on a mobile device too, especially if you don't have to be very precise with the distance. The end points can be a minimum distance, and the maximal value can be everywhere.


2

Put usability and accessibility concerns ahead of making the site paralax is the simple tenet that I would advise you follow in order to acheive your goal. Remember that content comes first, that users need to acheive goals easily. Work on good, accessible navigation and keep content clear and easy to find. Remember users browse on different devices and use ...


2

Two hamburgers would thoroughly confuse users. Combining the two menus is not a viable solution as the two menus are at a different level of hierarchy. One solution could be to replace the top hamburger menu with something more obvious, for example:


2

IMO, a responsive website hides no content and adds no content no matter what. It simply rearranges the content to fit on a screen better. If a webpage has location capability, why use it only on the mobile version? What if I'm on a laptop? When I use a website, I expect it to behave the same way no matter what I'm using it on.


2

I think with this many menu options the "hamburger menu" would be a good way to go. A lot of users know this approach from big sites and apps like Facebook. It is an easy way to give your users all menu options while saving a lot of screen real estate for your content when your navigation doesn't need to be visible. If your 1st level categories are just ...


2

You can keep hidden the two input controls, and show them only when the user taps one of the extremes: User should be able to drag extremes, which may also contain the current values.


2

Well, the definition of toggle is to switch from one effect, feature, or state to another. In the case of a navigation, it's a change between states. On the other hand, an overlay is something laid as a covering over something else. As you can see by the two definitions, they're completely different things. However, navigation overlays often implement ...


2

It honestly depends on the user. Their are pros and cons to each strategy. With an app, your users are going to have to take the extra step to go to their respective app store, download the app, then launch it and do the set up again (if there is any). However native apps tend to run more smoothly than a responsive site as a responsive site will most likely ...



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