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18

Had to deal w/a similar issue last year. Our task, which we couldn't change, was to convert an 11-section, 120-question "learning style" survey PDF into an interactive quiz. The original PDF is a daunting 10-pg list of questions & checkboxes, much like your example, which no student really wants to complete. Our solution was to break it up by ...


8

I think the length is the problem. A survey with 150 questions is simply not going to be user-friendly, no matter how you dress it up. You are asking far too much of your users. Also, a survey of this length is almost never necessary, nor is it even likely to be beneficial. Are there really 150 unique items you need to capture? Probably not. Most ...


7

Shorter survey will equal more completions. Since shortening the length is out of your influence, the following considerations will make it more likely to be completed. they are predicated on BJ Fogg's Behavior model. The formula is B= MAT. Behavior is a result of Motivation,ability and the trigger. Present the trigger to people in the right state of ...


4

Radio buttons are perfect for asking a question with 1 and only 1 answer. I can assure you, however, that with each radio button click the user will hate you exponentially more and more so anything you can do to reduce clicks is the way to go. Ways to reduce user clicks... If you can reduce the number of options from 5 to 3 that will help. For example: ...


4

You have a few options. I like the responsive "where am i?" breadcrumbs as demonstrated here. This option has the full breadcrumb trail in large windows and shrinks to only show custom text (such as "Where am I?") in narrow windows and on mobile devices. Example: Full screen: Home > Section 1 > Section Title That is Longer Becomes: Where Am I? ...


3

You're on the right track and you're close to solving the problem - you need to make the users WANT to continue answering questions. What incentives do you have for your users? Money / Discounts to goods and services? Rewards, such as participating in a community? The gamification aspect has to come first. Organizing the questions into convenient bite size ...


2

I'd first question whether you need global navigation on mobile. I'm often asked to implement global navigation on projects because project leads have a belief that users want to 'hand out' in the application and be able to navigate from one point to any other point. But in terms of actual usage, that's not now most people interact with most ...


2

It honestly depends on the user. Their are pros and cons to each strategy. With an app, your users are going to have to take the extra step to go to their respective app store, download the app, then launch it and do the set up again (if there is any). However native apps tend to run more smoothly than a responsive site as a responsive site will most likely ...


1

It depends. In general long forms where long = lots of form fields is a bad idea and should be avoided. Splitting a form into separate pages may help in that situation. But in your case, you're using the term long to refer to vertical height of the page. Remember that people are just fine scrolling--ESPECIALLY on touch devices. As such, I see no benefit ...



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