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17

There are a few reasons: Robot defense. Content sites (e.g. news sites) sometimes use these buttons to provide a rudimentary defense against content scrapers. By showing only part of the content they prevent scrapers from loading the page and parsing the article. This is obviously very crude, but it is still effective. Affirmation of user intent. ...


7

Quite the opposite, there are several good reasons to do it. Take a look to this article (I don't fully agree with all of it, but you'll get the gist of it) They are important for several reasons, most importantly because they allow designers to compress content on the home page. By compressing content, you fit more content in less space. This means ...


5

So the chosen answer, while good, is incorrect as regards this particular screenshot. I am actually responsible for implementing the button in the screen shot. I can't speak for every site but I can say that the thought process (as far as I know) is basically the 3rd option given by tohster. QZ only shows the read full button when you navigate directly to ...


2

I would invoke the UX classic 'Fitts's Law' here. While not the perfect rule in situations like this, it is a good concept to consider. Basically - it'll take the user longer to get the cursor over to the menu, and longer to notice the page has been updated having selected an option the further the menu is from the main content (where they are likely ...


1

you need a different approach here. The user is probably only interested in exceptions (red, orange, blue?) so you should render the display differently. I would advocate having a simple traffic light screen with each colour having a number beside it green (14), orange (3), red (2), blue (1). On click user goes to listing of all the issues of that ...


1

One thing I like to always do, is looking at if from the other way around and simply go mobile-first, so it definitly makes sense to try and do this exercise. The limitation of mobile phones lets you focus on the really important parts. When going to a tablet or desktop you'll notice that adding stuff is much easier than removing stuff. For the tables, I'd ...


1

I think one of the rules of thumb here is: "throw away half of the content, than, throw away half of what's left". It basically boils down to simply trying to get to the essence of your content. Try to see how other sites make a concise call to action, give bits of information, ... As quoted many times, users don't read, they scan. Even the resulting ...


1

I think this is something that should be deprioritized. It's definitely a nice-to-have, but you have to way it against other variables: how may users resize their browsers drastically on a desktop? of those users, how many are truly confused by the reflowed layout? how much time and money will it take to add these transitions? Will this affect time and ...



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