Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The idea behind a spinner, progress bar, etc. is to add the spinning element to your execution thread so when the operation starts the spinner shows up and when it ends, the spinner goes away. The way you are doing it seems to be wrong because you are not tying your spinner to the action itself and as result are adding an unnecessary delay to it. That ...


0

So, I bring up the spinner, and simply wait, oh, 0.6, 0.65, say, and only then actually call1 for the connection - which indeed then typically takes almost no time. What is the point of this? You don't even mention any reason at all (unless I missed it), which makes me assume you do this because the connection call can be very fast. Unlike the ...


0

On the subject of moving through large datasets, these two tools may help you build a more efficient UX: https://github.com/cmpolis/smart-table-scroll http://nexts.github.io/Clusterize.js/ Both written by Chris Polis.


0

Have you seen this in any production apps? (That is to say, I guess you'd have been on the development team - as you wouldn't necessarily know about it, I guess, as a user!) Yes, I think most of us have probably also done this because they like to see their clever little loader... but then move on. A loader should IMO only be used when something takes ...


1

Standards for wait times Microsoft has published standards for what your software can/must do during the first few seconds of wait time. You can begin reading the guidelines under the heading Is this the right control on this page (about progress bars) in the Microsoft Windows UX Guidelines. Please disregard that this topic is about progress bars, since ...


1

Perceived lag = latency + framerate Response timings described by Nielsen is something different than perceived lag. While waiting for a page to load, user is expecting to see some delay and is not providing any constant input. While drawing a picture, user is providing constant input and is expecting immediate response. User is going to notice lag ...


0

Besides handling the delay as it happens I think it would be good to let the user know of the connection quality early on. A good example for this is when calling someone on Skype. With this the user is prepared to expect a delay based on their connection strength rather than get caught off guard while they are working on something.


9

First, you might reconsider the framing of the problem. The way you described it, if the user draws an object but the server doesn’t receive it, then the object was never drawn. From a UX standpoint this is precisely backwards, a system-oriented way of thinking. UX is user-centered. The system is not the authority, the user is. An object is drawn as soon as ...


3

I think it's vitally important there be minimal latency in operations like drawing (or any mouse driven operation), so I propose a third option: perform the draw operation immediately (on the client) but indicate that the drawn object is in a pending state. The pending state can be indicated by having the object grayed out or a special color or a special ...


0

You've mostly answered your own question, if you answer this one: Do your users need to upload images larger than 1MB? For reference, that's about 3 or 4 megapixel.


0

Both are valable, but it really depends on the goal you want to accomodate for. Always try and ask the 5 whys; this is what a "great startup" would probably do to. My technical respons would be that in this day and age its better to use the client side variant, as it lowers server load and presents more direct feedback. Client systems are more powerful as ...


0

Here's an alternative perspective on it. Not an absolute rule, but a thing to keep in mind. It depends on what the image is for. Content, or decoration? If it's a background or other design element, use progressive, so the page looks okay-ish as soon as possible. If it's an element that moves stuff around, it needs to be there ASAP so people don't ...


0

+1 to DA01 If OP is referring to reduced file size as "optimized" then here are some standard practices when saving as JPEG. Don't embed color profiles. Browsers these days have better ICC profile support. Export image as sRGB Set metadata to none Set quality at 65%. More about quality settings can be found here. Ensure the file size and dimensions are in ...


15

It seems that you're already leaning towards the second option there, and I agree with you. Causing delays is better than creating complete frustration. Either way, users react differently to slow responset times, as Jakob nielsen puts it: Response-Time Limits The 3 response-time limits are the same today as when I wrote about them in 1993 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included