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You are lucky to have 400,000 daily uniques to work with. I think A/B testing will be effective for this decision. You may want to keep in mind that interviewing or surveying users can create perception and framing biases which distorts results. With such a large sample size at your disposal, an alternative approach is to do the A/B test and simply ...


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A/B Testing would be your best bet. We use Monetate (http://www.monetate.com) for A/B testing at our company, but there are others (Optimizely is another great tool: http://www.optimizely.com). The only drawback is that in order to measure true performance, you would have to create 2 separate pages (and then redirect 50% of users to the test page). Another ...


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In your situation, you can only test this A/B speed variation to only those site users who have used both version But why ask users when you can measure and prove loading speed with a lot of online tools Second thought is when site loading speed is concerned, loading speed is a quantifiable performance measure so you or your developer should use tools ...


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This is A/B testing. You are right by separating user (randomly) and redirecting on one of the two way of loading. You may add a link like How fast is this website? in a corner to display your survey but I would recommend to not believe what your user think but what they do ! (A link to not disturb users if they do not have time to spare) Estimate what ...


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A/B testing is a viable method to compare two solutions to a problem. I would, however, like to propose a third. Perhaps it may be better, if possible, to tackle the underlying problem as to why the website takes so long to load. Focusing on your core proposal, offerings and gauging why people come to your website, then steering your content and design to ...


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Having a context menu is nice for a shortcut, but in this instance may be causing more frustration than help. Can you change the location of where the action is performed to something like 1) select the object and 2) find the action on an action bar. Something like this: This buys you some time because the user has to move their attention and cursor from ...


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Not showing anything before the check was done - violates the immediate feedback heuristic. Show the menu immediately but change it in anyway (enable or show some actions) once you know what's possible could disorient users - the interface changes but how the user suppose to know what's happening and when the shown options are really the ones? Although ...


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Generally, pick speed over image quality. But if you're willing to invest, you may be able to get both. The tradeoff here is image quality vs load time, and I don't think studies are going to help you particularly because the results really depend on how your site uses images. For example, if you are displaying products in a grid, users tend to be much ...



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