New answers tagged

1

ISO9241-11 defines usability as: "The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction in a specified context of use." You will note that the word simplification is not mentioned at all in this definition. Usability is about: Effectiveness - can users complete tasks, ...


2

As a starting point for you I can help answer the following part of your question: I am curious as to whether there have been studies of elevator dispatch algorithms combined with human behaviour to optimize such systems According to Cortés, Larrañeta and Onieva (of Seville University), researching elevator systems is only a fairly recent phenomenon: ...


1

In some elevator lobbies, I've noticed where 1 lift will only service odd number floor and one will only handle the even numbers for instance. i believe this would optimize time taken and efficiency in the elevators. Another way to approach this is by numbers. have some kind of tracking set-up to record the frequency of which floors were serviced per ...


0

(I turned my comment into an answer) I don't have any published research for you but the reason we generally don't ask those things in interviews is because interviews tend to be geared towards qualitative research whereas, the questions you mentioned are more quantitative. Usually, in an interview, you are testing a hypothesis (Like "Can the user find how ...


2

I agree with you on all but number 3. I feel like the pop-up window asking if you're sure fits the "Permit easy reversal of actions" principle. Attempting to close a file isn't necessarily an error, however if the user has clicked it by accident, it allows them to change their mind. Simple error handling does fit, in a way, but I believe that the second ...


0

Although I totally get the position you are in, instead of trying to "fix" the old implementation, maybe you should consider starting from the beginning of the UX process, particularly gaining an understanding of what particular types of users (personas) most want to get out of the system (red routes). Maybe working on information architecture. Do some ...


0

The problem I have always encountered when trying to apply UX to a portfolio site is knowing who the end users are and what they are looking for. Personally, I have used mine to apply for work in some incredibly diverse markets (everything from corporate banking organisations to independent entertainment companies) and they are all looking for different ...


1

A survey would help if you're trying to figure out what hiring managers want to see in a UX candidate. Be aware however, that UX is very broad and it would depend on what kind of UX job you want to get into. When you create your survey, think about what skills the position will require. Coding? Prototyping? User Research? Usability Tests? Decide on these ...



Top 50 recent answers are included