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Although I totally get the position you are in, instead of trying to "fix" the old implementation, maybe you should consider starting from the beginning of the UX process, particularly gaining an understanding of what particular types of users (personas) most want to get out of the system (red routes). Maybe working on information architecture. Do some ...


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The problem I have always encountered when trying to apply UX to a portfolio site is knowing who the end users are and what they are looking for. Personally, I have used mine to apply for work in some incredibly diverse markets (everything from corporate banking organisations to independent entertainment companies) and they are all looking for different ...


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A survey would help if you're trying to figure out what hiring managers want to see in a UX candidate. Be aware however, that UX is very broad and it would depend on what kind of UX job you want to get into. When you create your survey, think about what skills the position will require. Coding? Prototyping? User Research? Usability Tests? Decide on these ...


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If someone gives you their email address for registration purposes, that is not consent to be spammed with an unwanted mailing list. They only want to be on a mailing list if they explicitly say they want to be on it. As this article, 6 Ways To Improve Your Customers’ Email Opt-in Experience, says: …if you don’t know what makes your company awesome and ...


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Just get started Nothing is constant in the market: Your personas will change over time. The key is to start putting personas to work in your product now, knowing that you'll have another group to address tomorrow. As you assess interview findings, the majority groups will surface. There's always more nuance to be discovered, but don't let "paralysis by ...


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Like many things in UX, it depends on your solution and how you are creating your persona, e.g. are you researching real users or basing them on roles or job titles? Alan Cooper's book "About Face 3: The Essentials of Interaction Design" devotes a whole chapter to persona and the persona creation process (Chapter 5 Modelling Users: Persona and Goals). He ...


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This phrase occurs again and again in UX: "It depends" It's really dependant on the number of personality facets you need to align to and the depth you want your service to appeal to. You don't need a Persona for each personality trait. Personality traits can be combined into a single persona. I've worked with as few as two to as many as seven.


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Chat bots are not a new concept, but still in their infancy. Thanks to deep learning they start to mature. A lot of user research should be done so that they can be accepted by the society and avoid being called stupid bots. Amelia is interesting implementations I know: a virtual call centre agent that uses deep learning which can successfully handle 60% of ...


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While pretotyping has a marketing-ish side , I think its approach is interesting. Granted, it can be solved by other different testing approaches, but I think it has some merits to hold its own place. Also, despite the similar wording, I don't think it's the same as prototyping. Or at least, they have different intentions. From Prototyping page: ...


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In Aguascalientes, Mexico, I worked in a telemarketing company with almost 2,000 employees, I was able to help the quality department in the agent notes section and checked side-by-side performance of ~1,000 employees, of which only 6 were able to type faster than 60 wpm, they were of course touch-typists, if you include me in the sample, that'd mean 0.7% I ...



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