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4

Firstly, and unfortunately for you, I don't think the client has unreasonable expectations. What failed is the conversation between you and the client that voices those expectations. Most likely the client didn't know what they needed to ask for, which is where your expertise is supposed to come in (as the provider of development services). I might be wrong ...


3

At an abstract high level, Requirement Gathering still works, i.e. it doesn't specify how you will gather/discover the requirements nor the process. However, I agree with you that it does not exactly match what we do. I doubt we can come up with an alternative which will go on to become an UX industry terminology.


3

Your situation is one most designers/developers have gone through once (at least some kind of disagreement with a client). So don’t worry! This is a typical example of what’s so important about good communication between you and your client. Not just to get clear what your client wants, but let them be aware of where their wishes come from and what ...


1

Simple answer: No. Longer answer: The "Requirements Gathering" stage is not about formulating a solution. It is about gathering together the requirements that any proposed solution must satisfy in order to be considered successful. It's like finding out what kinds of food your friends prefer before you look for a restaurant to book. You can then use ...


1

Term "Gathering" suggests that the requirements are already existing, and one just needs to collect them through some means. I guess user/product requirements also already exist, in that there are several possible solutions to meet what the user's expectations are, and you just need to collect them through some means. A good product is not built ...


1

It is quite accurate description of a process of collecting the things that are needed: requirement (n.): "things required, a need" gathering (n.): "an assembly of people, act of coming together," gather (v.) "unite, agree, assemble; gather, collect, store up" I don't think hypothesis formulation comes anywhere close to convey the true ...


1

I think that the main problem is that your quote is already a part of the solution, and is not the real user story. You're also right when you say it's incomplete. In this case, a better user story orientation should be "As a client manager, I want to quickly identify clients close to churn, so I can call them and provide them help or commercial offer to ...


1

I hate to sound patronising when I respond on StackExchange, but I have to say - you sound too inexperienced to be in this kind of situation with a client. You're asking questions that web developers should know (i.e. the basics of responsiveness). You're including "incorrectly" in a quote as though it's not the case. The fact is, it is incorrect, and yes ...


1

go for responsive website design. Responsive design will solve the problem that you are facing. GOOGLE responsive and you will get many articles. Read them and learn the trick.


1

There are many commonalities in the way they all influence the success of the product. User experience is as good as any other architectural concerns - be it security, performance - and in fact they cross cut. Providing a hint on security question enhances user experience of an application and has to be stopping a point before it can become a good enough ...



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