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6

The goal of indicators like this is to inform the user when something is different. So, let the form tell you how you should approach it. In general if most of your form is required, state that up front and then flag Optional fields accordingly. Inversely, if most of your form is optional but a few are required, flag the required fields. This short post ...


5

As The technologies are changing and evolving we can experiment so many designs to perform the same task rather than use a red star in front of the required field , Its a good practice according to the ux point of view not to make the optional and required field messed up , make them separate and let the user fill the necessary information . Most probably ...


4

The user experience will suffer if you make it a past-input check. Users enter content, probably write a bunch of lines and get a message about how it isn't okay after they did all the work, this leads to a bad experience. So you have to display the potential errors on-the-fly. Like "Still 100 words to go" Also, you should consider analyse what high ...


3

Whether to split the menu up into categories depends on how many options you have available. What you should be thinking about is how quickly can a user scan the menu and find what they are looking for. In western cultures a user will read from left to right, top to bottom. The first example you give is a little cluttered looking and makes me do too much ...


2

It's quite an odd question, since stakeholders and/or sponsors usually fund and initiate projects. If the stakeholders are unknown, and you have no customer party to talk to, I don't think you have a project at all. But "methods for communication" with stakeholders - we have a lot. In the 1990's and before that the waterfall project methology was popular. ...


2

If the majority of the advanced search users are familiar with the difference between "Integer" and "Decimal". (And will I recommend you perform a quick user test to confirm this assumption.) Then consider putting in a small thing to explain terminology for the minority. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups It's ...


2

Put it to them this way: these days, the word "integer" gets taught at elementary level. Most people are going to know what it means. I do see their point for more technical terms though - if people aren't going to understand, you have a problem. A possible solution is to add a clickable question mark icon next to technical terms that produces a definition ...


1

The following depends on: Their reasons for staying quiet Are they shy & afraid of public speaking? Or busy & annoyed to be there? The culture you're in Do you have authority to ask them to do things, or will they be offended? Is there some seniority or cultural reason they might not voice concerns or ideas? How much time you have for the ...


1

You have a particular set of skills, as does marketing. You're concerned about the twenty percent that gets it, and they're concerned about the other eighty percent. The two perspectives are complementary. I wouldn't assume that your users know their data types as well as a programmer or mathematician would. Why not use "number" with a single input, ...


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I think marketing have a point. I'd invest in doing some initial face to face user research to actually understand what your customers want and what they understand.


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What about labeling it "Whole Numbers"? Also I suggest an A/B-Test on this: One with "Integer", one with "Whole Numbers". Which performs better? Btw about question mark icons: I ran a usability test for my bachelor thesis. Findings: No one considered reading the question mark info, even though the answer to successfully ending a task was completely ...


1

You should say to the marketing team, that if the customers are attorneys they have the obligation of knowing what an integer and a decimal are, because a cause can be lost on a court, just from not having the right words proffered. In the Law and Rights area, the attention to the little linguistic details in the text is very important.


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When it comes to situations like this, consistency is the key. The general indication that there is more information regarding a field (such as required or optional) is the asterisk (*) next to the field, and then at the bottom of the form (or someplace easily visible) explain what the * means. If you're going to use the * to indicate a required field, you ...


1

I don't have experience with this yet, so this might not answer your question fully. But have you looked at job stories? Introduction to Jobs-to-be-done here This article goes into why job stories are better in some cases (and I believe in your case) than user stories. Since you compare it to photoshop and excel, I think you have a system that has many ...


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When I'm working on a project, I work with a core project team and stakeholders. Stakeholders may initiate a project, but they're not always involved day to day (or even week to week). Stakeholders may also be people who haven't initiated thee work but need to be consulted in order for the work to be successful. Normally, to engage with stakeholders, I ...



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