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107

Imagine you’re telling a friend a story about a time you took a flying class. You want to give an idea of when the story takes place. What format should you supply the time in? Should you say “The date was 2014/12/31 and the time was 16:05:03 PST”? Of course not. The point of the story isn’t the exact time you took the class. You want to focus on ...


43

Not enough reputation to comment, but on many sites with this "friendly" time, you can actually hover to get the exact time. Try it over on this question's "asked" and "active" times on the right hand side.


22

This is the use of relative timestamps. In relative timestamps, accuracy isn't important, and immediacy of scanning prevails over accuracy, so things like this may happen, where you see "1 year ago" until Aug 15, 2015, where you'll see 2 years ago. There's a lot of controversy about this approach, and IMHO, it's correct that you could add something a bit ...


21

Timestamps aren't meant for most users Showing friendly names such as 2 hours ago or yesterday can quickly provide context to the user as opposed to showing them 2015-01-27 18:54:03.259 Mixing both formats together will always cause friction (anything that forces a user to ask a question in their mind adds to cognitive friction). In almost all cases ...


18

How about something like this? It removes the confusion between occurring one-time and repeating once by changing the terminology. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Find out how your users think about this. If it's important for them to know the total number of occurrences rather than the total number of repeats, ...


11

You've caught a common bug (IME) in the implementation of these relative time/date stamps -- at a step-change in the precision you lose a lot of information due to rounding, and the rounding is always down. It's common (I assume due to a built in library) on Android apps to get "59 minutes ago" (more precise than needed) then "1 hour ago" displayed for the ...


8

A lighting bolt denotes charging on both iOS and Android. Wall sockets vary country to country, a lightning bolt is synonymous with power.


7

Your proposed solution also introduces a jump. If it's 20 June 2013, and I see a post dated “22 June”, I'm going to think “June this year”, and then do a double take because that's still into the future. When it's June 2013, all posts from June 2012 should be marked “June '12”. As the end of the month approaches, it may be good to mark posts from July as ...


6

If one wants a more advanced option, I'd take a peek at Microsoft Outlook, where you can be pretty specific on what you want. In our organization we have a meeting the third thursday every other month. And it can be accomplished in Outlook, which is very nice. I don't need to calculate which thursday is the right one. This setup may be overdoing what you ...


5

Website should always include the year in title. This is to set a non-confusing standard for everyone. It is also important for crawlers and web scrappers since the full UTC date can be easily transformed to a timestamp with a single method call, where machines can understand it.


5

Displaying the day of the week (e.g. Monday, Tuesday) usually only makes sense when the date is either recently passed (i.e. within the last week) or in the future. When a date has recently passed, stating the day of the week makes it easier to recognise within that limited context. For future events, knowing on what day of the week it's due to take place is ...


4

For a budget app, I believe the users would think in terms of frequency rather than repetitions. If I were putting some numbers into a budget, I would think: "Once a week" "Once a month" "Once every second month" "Every monday and wednesday" etc etc


4

Include the year once nine months have passed. You don't want to include the year when it's inferred, as it's generally a bad idea to increase noise without an increase in signal, particularly when that noise takes a datestamp above the ten-character scale of a single fovea fixation. That reduces scan-ability, which might be a detriment in certain usecases. ...


4

I think a better way would be a stacked bar graph. It would be one bar so the row height wouldn't matter, and it would be split up into colors the same way. Each color should take up whatever % of the bar, and they should be arranged in order so that the smaller ones are on one side and the larger ones towards the other. You should add a hover state (like ...


4

$100.00 - does not impart enough information to an international user. The '$' symbol (and many other currency symbols) are used by multiple countries. USD 100.00 - is not generally the order used, and if someone doesn't know what "USD" means they could be lost. 100.00 USD - is better, but still suffers from the "USD" issue. Also, as I scan "100" is a ...


3

In the case of the SE example, I don't see a huge problem with this. It's not like it's telling you the post was made "a year ago" vs. just a few days ago. As long as you're leaving the date/time on a post rather than insisting it's just 'a year ago", 90% of folks will be smart enough to figure out it's recent, and the remaining 10% don't care. If you ...


3

You really shouldn't have to make your users think too much. It may be obvious now, but in the middle of the year (say, April), will it really be obvious that "March" means "a month ago" and "May" means "a year ago"? Even worse, what if it is April 15 and you see "April 16th"? (this can be avoided by doing it month-wise, though) It's even more confusing, ...


2

Your example seems perfectly fine to me, and that's generally how games represent this situation for recipes/etc: it's a convention. If you want to drive the point home even further you might want a clearer message when you don't have enough; maybe a little bubble that reads "you need X more" or a (?) icon which reveals that information. The checkmark ...


2

I'd put a small count bubble in the top left w/ the amount that they have. Preferrably over the avatar representing the item. Then at the bottom, I'd put "Wants #". Then color the count bubble green or red to indicate whether or not the deal is good. Considering the input from Ben Brocka, maybe this would be ideal:


2

If you be willing to trade-off "parts-of-a-whole" against seeing narrow "slices", you could use vertical bar plots with a logarithmic scale. This is how such a diagram might look like (instead of small stacked boxes representing the individual items, also usual bars can be used): I think this representation also provides further advantages: You could ...


2

For simplifying and making your visual encoding system more consistent you can use the set:


2

I guess we'll all have to chip in with our ideas, but I fail to see anyone giving a 'right' answer to this. The problem is that it is hard to associate icons with these words, without requiring users to know what the icons actually stand for (if such is the case I'd go for the last option). You may wish to consider traffic light colours: Red for ...


2

The moment you state a date instead of an elapsed time (where 48 hours do really seem to provide a good boundary), the year should be mentioned. Why? Just imagine in the dark distant future a mirror that didn't know about your smart-date-adjuster(TM) becomes the only available source, with no information on the actual crawling date. How should a visitor now ...


2

While Evil Closet Monkey's answer is really nice, there might be some over-thinking going on here, and I think this might be a simpler solution. Add "USD" if you feel like it, especially when there are multiple currencies in certain countries, but the flag should largely do the tick. Aside from that, perhaps put the price in a dropdown, or otherwise have ...


2

I got theese two sketeches: Maybe they Inspire you


2

If it plugs specifically to a wall you could use something like this, which includes both the classic bolt icon and also a specific plug to the wall:


2

One plausible UX reason for this is preventing the situation where a user sees a date, fails to notice the year, and due to the proximity of month/day, assumes that the post was made within the past few days/weeks rather than (possibly many) years ago. This sort of user error can lead to embarrassing answers/comments/follow-ups on content where they're no ...


1

I would show the connection direction with an arrow like: [microphone image]-------->[cam image]


1

The Question's Title (repeated in the body too) is : Should UTC timestamps include day of the week or not? The answer is "it depends": If humans don't need to know the Day-of-Week for a timestamp, then No. If humans do need to know the day-of-week for the timestamp, but they can have the date processed for them order to determine the day-of-week, ...


1

Have you tried using colors? if colors are not an options, then different shades of grey with different variations of weights should help. remember, just because one column is important that does not mean other columns do no needs any effects(like less important columns could be made thinner or with different shades grey to reduce importance) My suggestion, ...



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