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2

Re Question 3 - Getting more info on users: let them add this voluntarily and progressively ( A bit like Linkedin does - with a '% completed' bar which pops up to remind the user from time to time ) If you force people to hand over info they will either go away or just make stuff up.


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Sending email verifications with link inside seem to be the most used and accurate way to prevent from non-human registrations. As part of the core of your website related to social networking, IMHO allowing non-verified users navigate with a top bar as a reminder to activate their account would probably bother the website usability discouraging them to ...


0

Instead of trusting the user, do some verification on the backend. As your website seems to be catered to software developers in Bangladesh, there's probably a pattern that phone numbers follow in Bangladesh. You can use that to do some simple pattern matching and return an error to the user if phone numbers don't match. That way the user will know that a ...


2

I don't think clarity is the issue here. People simply don't want to give you their mobile phone number. I'd be very reluctant to share such private information too especially because you don't seem to explain anywhere why this information is needed. If you actually need the phone number explain why. If you don't need it don't ask.


3

I work with some products that use SMS so I have some experience with this issue. First, it is considered rude if you don't tell users you are going to SMS their mobile phone number well in advance. In most countries, an SMS may actually cost the user a small amount of money, so not telling the user before she provides her mobile number is a breach of ...


1

A couple thoughts: I found this article. Worth the read. I gathered that this appears to be a sensitive topic and, thus, it might not go over well in a registration form for a streaming service. If you're a Google Analytics user, consider enabling Demographics and Interests so you can glean that data but not force the user to answer a question. You may not ...


1

Since there is no actual authentication of credentials to access the system, you don't need to have a "login" form and a "registration" form (quotes because you're saying there are no user accounts). If users submit content only occasionally, you can do away with the separate screen altogether and just prompt them for their name/username/e-mail in the ...


2

Dont ask them their ethnicity on the signup page! You can remind them later that various aspects of their profile are incomplete (not just their ethnicity.) but if they complete everything except the ethnicity - they're doing it on principle, so stop reminding! If the incomplete sections are in a different colour there would be no need to remind though ...


2

Wow, what a pleasantly different experience. Unfortunately, this user scenario puts you at odds with just about every login/register experience on the web. This means you'll be fighting a unique UX battle if you don't go with the industry-standard process, which separates login and registering. As is always said, don't reinvent the wheel. I would ...


0

I see some kind of problem to be forced in this case, and in my opinion good design should help make it easier: New users in several cases might be confused by which account type should they choose. Of course most of them will not have a problem with that - usually it's clear that a student is a student and a teacher is a teacher. However there's the ...


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Why don't you do: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This allows them to choose a path, then register accordingly.


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I think you need to look at this from information architecture point of view. It seems to me that that the "user type" is the largest (most encompassing) category you have so I would start the registration form by asking about the type and then direct users to separate workflows. In the future and if need be this will help you to easily personalise the ...


7

Update: Is it legitimate to ask for ethnicity or Race? As all UX answers go: It depends, but there are at least two main areas where asking for ethnicity is absolutely fine: For Medical Reasons: For Obvious medical reasons to assess risk factors for both insurers or as part of doctor patient interactions. For less obvious medical reasons, for example: ...


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According to what i have been studying, the more appropriate way is to show it with the form, preferably at the start. I am sure you are giving these 5 options for a reason. Is there any specific reason you want your form to look shorter?


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Most answers here are "Please don't ask"-answers, so by now you know that inquiring about ethnicity is a very sensitive matter. I won't dig into this. Generalize To my knowledge, there aren't any complete lists. The reason for this is obvious...ahem sensitive, remember? If you are willing to put some time into this, create your own list by doing some ...


1

Casting the controversy of "Whether you should ask" aside... to simply answer the question of how/where to position the question of ethnicity so that it does not remain unanswered: Having it on the sign-up page is definitely effective: there's no guarantee that every user will revisit his/her profile and refine. This means that a drop-down will be more ...


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There is no comprehensive list that includes everyone Ethnicity is not always defined formally, and attempts to define formal ethnicities are often lacking. For example, the Lao government has categorized the entire population into 49 official major ethnicities in 160 ethnic groups, and yet there are many who feel that their identity has been neglected. ...


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Where is the best place to ask the user their ethnicity? Honestly -- in the doctors office. Unless the benefit to the user is clear then don't ask for it. You wanting to keep track for your own records isn't clear benefit to the user. If it turns out that a user sees value in telling you their ethnicity (like in a doctor's office due to ethnic ...


2

Some opinionated comments. And hopefully part of an answer. I would use a drop-down list and not pre-fill it with anything. Don't accept an empty box, but provide a list choice which is "Prefer not to say" but phrased better. :) Not pre-filling it makes the user at least think about it, so that you don't get the default answer all the time. Be sure to keep ...


4

Yes you should give user control over the app, always! It is one of the points you check for in heuristic evaluation. I use ISO 9241-110 Ergomics standard for interactive dialog and controlability is one dedicated chapter of it. What happens, if one enters a wrong, but valid working email? How can I correct it, if I recognise the error? A Sidenote: Why did ...


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i have been going throughout this issue on a Telecommunication project. However the persona and the usage are different, the old journeys have been translated from accordion off the wizard journey ( for application reason ). Its mobile reference contains same ideology; also the modus behind the journey is a shortened wizard. The validations are made on a ...


1

If it's just work emails you could always remove the need for users to enter the domain, a bit like the sign in for Slack. Further to your question I don't think there's any harm in allowing users to go back and edit the email field.



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