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1

To answer this question: Lets lay down some basic methodolgy and points about registration and how social media integrates with these systems. firstly People dont like to register for things, especially not with their email due to spam and unsollicited messages concerns. Its often a hastle The solution: Make registration less painful by letting users ...


2

On a long form like this where there are multiple groups of questions there is a good chance something might go wrong for the user. I would focus on asking one thing per page, eg "Your contact details" followed by "How would you like to receive your parcel". Having only one thing on a page gives you more space to explain why you are asking for certain ...


2

Lots of good advice here. It probably boils down to the following: Are there lots of fields where the potential for making errors is high? If you have a long page you cannot rely on inline error validation, because your users may not visit any of the fields and may simply jump to the primary call to action. If they do this the system will need to report ...


6

Good question without a definitive answer. In short, both long page and divided page has their advantages and disadvantages. You will not make a big mistake by using either one of them. Recently I had one publication on that specific topic which was accepted at the CHI conference which is the top HCI conference. Here is a link to download the article. ...


2

I think the best solution is to split that long form into steps. From users perspective is easier and less scarier for them to handle a form like this. Also it’s easier for user to get lost in a long form and it’s very difficult to present error, especially when there are multiple errors. In e-commerce this “step-by-step” behaviour is well known and the ...


2

If registration 2 page is just optional information i think you should split that information into multiple pages. This is what we called progressive disclosure. This helps the user to digest the information better and it doesn't feel claustrophobic with a screen full of options. You can use a wizard style design with a few important points. Let the user ...



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