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0

Well I would ask if the purpose of the screen is login or signup? Are you using one screen simply meant to be directed to from a login link/CTA and the signup is being led to from some marketing or sales CTAs? If the main idea is to get users to fill out credentials and convert them into accounts, I'd lead with a form for signup with a "already a ...


1

I would blame it on bad form design. Often personal information like address, city, phone number and email are considered to be standard inputs for forms. It's used because other forms use them too. When I worked for an ecommerce company I asked them questions about their forms. I asked them why there were two input for phone numbers (optional). They said ...


2

I'm a little unclear on the form you filled up; it sounds like an online coupon you filled out and not an actual membership form. I can see legitimate reasons for collecting phone numbers for gym members (e.g. a way to contact you if they find a lost object of yours, emergency contact in case of accident) but in this case it sounds most likely like they're ...


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Potentially for further identification of the gym member. i'm not sure what other information they may have asked for in the form, but it is possible (not probable) that two members have the same name, birthday, and several other identifying features, but they're not too likely to have the same phone number.


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Here are three reasons: Collecting numbers database for spam Use phone number as a login (not your case) Bad form design


4

The answer is: you've already registered. Here's what I see:


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I don't think the user needs an extra link to help close their browser window, as there's already a standard close button that they know how to use. Instead, suggest that they've completed registration, and tell them that they can close the window. And, even better, have a button to go to what they were trying to do before they registered (like commenting ...


0

Without knowing the context, I would be more inclined to link someone back to login page or homepage after this type of registration. This way, they could have some options if they haven't received an email/spam etc. However, if you're set on your initial approach I would go with something like: Thank you + check email to activate message. Btn - 'Close ...


2

In most cases I agree that it is the better option to minimize the number of steps or actions the user needs to go through. Accepting a ToS is a different thing in my opinion. Even though most people probably doesn't read the ToS anyway I would consider it too important to "hide" the action. Unless you make the text below the Sign Up button VERY visible I ...


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You could reference the names and look for existing entries after you unfocus the last name field, but the problem is if you have users with the same name. Working for a company running national registration-oriented promotion campaigns, this happens more often than I had ever realized. We cross referenced name and email address as well, but since your scale ...


0

In addition to the reduction to cognitive load - It might sometimes be a technical limitation. Many sites take you to completely different area as that separated area might be run by a completely third party site. Contests and Loyalty on some Publisher properties can run this way. That may partially answer the back button dilemma. The other half is ...


1

With all these good suggestions, consider two factors: 1. Incentive What incentive is driving your user to complete the form? This is directly proportional to the number of fields you can get completed. If the incentive is low (i.e., trial of a new, untested product), have few fields (1-3). If the incentive is high (i.e., registering to attend a ...


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Here I'm giving a try- there are many dependencies the service provider would validate while anyone sign up for them. 1. Correct information 2. Security 3. Avoiding spam From user experience point of view during signup, user has to depend upon his cognitive load. they have to recollect many things and also try different options. So to reduce this load, ...


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If a user is directed to a sign up page then the only thing available for the user must be to sign up. When it comes to user experience the user must get what he/she is looking for and what he/she has come there for. Keeping other options/ information on the page may not only be less productive but may also host as a distraction for the visiting user. Hence ...


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Making a well designed on- boarding wizard kind of flow (lots of forms up front with the option to skip) can be very useful not just in collecting info but in guiding a user through the app. If you ask me for my college alma mater, for instance, you're also showing me that alma mater is important to a good experience on the platform. It can double as an ...


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How about showing user multiple small-ish forms in a series to fill out your big form, the little forms' questions should be in reasonable group. eg: personal info, contact details, etc... Let the user fills in the crucial information and give them option to skip other part to do later.


2

Is activation absolutely required before continuing the process? If not, you might try something like this: Checkout form is one page. At the top is two or three fields for registration: email address, password, maybe their name. Then below that is just their payment information. When they submit the form, it logs them in and takes them to their dashboard. ...


2

A quick correction to the top answer by @PatomaS "creating an account on Amazon to buy things, is worth the effort." Amazon is an exception in the case of e-commerce. When selling things a login just gets in the way. All you need is their email address. The user can access orders using their email and order number and are sent a password if they want ...


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Generally speaking, people are coming to your site/app to perform a certain activity. Whether it's buying a present for their friend's birthday, or obtaining a piece of information related to their work. The fewer barriers you put between the User and them achieving that goal, the more successful the site/app you are creating will be in serving the User. ...


0

I think you should distinguish between the registration and buying the product. I suggest to keep only the necessary fields that will enable you to communicate with your users following a successful registration (for example in order to upgrade their account). It's known that as the number of form fields increases, conversion rates decrease-see the graph ...


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Yes. Yes we are. This is a perfect example. I was on Stack Overflow, logged in, and saw this question on the side bar. I wanted to comment and guess what - I have to log in again. Why? What is the point? Now I need to create a Stack Exchange account also? What PatomaS said is dead on: "The most important thing here, is the reason. usually people won't mind ...


1

In a world with open ID, users are sick of sites that don't give them the option of using a login they already have but instead insist on them making a new username and password, and putting arbitrary password restrictions on them (e.g. exactly 8 characters, with 1 uppercase letters, 2 lower, 4 digits, and a squiggly).


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Logins for trivial purposes aren't just annoying for users, they can be very dangerous. Here's why. No one practices good password security. You do. I do. Bruce Schneier does. But the vast majority of internet users do not. They use the same 5 or 6 passwords over and over again because everything else is just too damn complicated for them. Remember that ...


3

One solution is to give your user the option to choose which is best for them. Luke Wroblewski wrote a post that covers this issue well: By default Polar displays your password on our Log In screen as readable text. A simple, Hide action is present right next to the password field so in situations where you might need to, you can switch the password ...


1

I assume that you want to increase the registration rate, so I suggest to keep only the necessary fields that will enable you to communicate with your users following a successful registration (for example in order to upgrade their account). It's known that as the number of form fields increases, conversion rates decrease-see the graph below. I recommend ...


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4chan has a very unique user system that may be worth examining: Anyone can post to 4chan, with absolutely no registration or login required; instead, users must solve a separate captcha for every post. Proof-of-identity for post deletion is handled by having users supply a password (by default, the client generates it for you, so you don't have to enter ...


1

If the users expect to spend a lot of time on the site, they would not mind creating an account. Otherwise you will lose the prospect, because the effort (typing e-mail, remembering the password) is not worth the benefit. A good alternative is to use OpenID (like SE does - "Sign up", "Using Google", "Accept", "Confirm"). Just remember not to request any ...


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Depends of how user-friendly the site is Not only forced logins irritate, but also passwords complexity policies and, of course, unreadable Captchas. Password policies sometimes make more harm than use. If an user cares about his security, he often has his own password-making algorithms for different sites and when the password policy prevents him to set ...


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Hiding information behind logins is really bad from the usability standpoint. Imagine you are a user who googles for a certain piece of information. Workflow on website without registration-wall: enter search-term into search-engine click on first result read question to confirm it's really relevant read answer Workflow with registration-wall enter ...


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I disagree with @Alphabeticaa's answer. From personal experience, I hate it when I need to register simply because I wish to view an article or post a simple question. I have a "dump" e-mail address with a free provider especially for these "one-time" registrations but I try to avoid them. As a concrete example, I often browse the Stack Exchange websites ...


2

Yes and no. Logins (and sign ups) sometimes make people feel like they are part of something. A lot of the time, people sign up and log in so that they don't forget about a certain site, and to feel like they a part of the community. As PatomaS said - there often needs to be a reason to sign up. Special content, features, abilities. It's give and take. As ...


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Answering you question, which doesn't involve specific motivation behind it. Yes, people don't like to register on sites, people don't like giving information all the time, people don't like remembering passwords and user names. This behaviour is common to everyone, but some groups are more annoyed than others and some are more radical than others; for ...


1

The are several methods up implement this, utilised by many high profile sites today. Invitation Only, pyramids Google did this by providing limited invitations to phase 1 users. For phase 2 they provided those users with limited invitations so they may grow the database but only after a certain usage time is met. Incrementally provide access When ...


0

In recent apps I have been trying a bit of a new format for keeping the flow of a user's registration in one piece: User fills in form. As soon as they enter an email address, I validate it and email a confirm code using ajax. Before finishing the registration form, the code must be input. Once they click done on the form, they are registered and verified. ...


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Like other people suggested, it's a very good idea to let user's explore your app before email verification or give up email verification at all. But if you really need email verification, you may use the mobile's capabilities to improve the user experience. Fill in sign up form. Done. (Available features are still restricted.) Your app checks emails in ...


1

Using oAuth for logging in with social media is normally used in two separate ways. An option to create an account with an existing social media account so user normally don't have to go through the tedious process of filling out forms and authenticating email addresses. An option to link their [your-web-application-name]account with one or several social ...



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