New answers tagged

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Never provide an attacker with any clue whatsoever to his only question: "What account credentials may be valid?" This is a problem comparable to the error message that one would show when a login fails. You shoudl never state things like "Wrong password" or "Wrong username". Use phrases like "Wrong credentials" or "Wrong username/password combination". ...


5

No, please don't First of all, I'd try to study and test if I need a captcha. And I mean, test it thoroughly. While Captcha are an obvious enhance in security, they have severe issues in terms of usability. see the docs below: Usability of CAPTCHAs - Or usability issues in CAPTCHA design Recent Findings On Captcha & The User Experience CAPTCHA Can ...


7

If you clear the password field when you have a faulty password, then it should clear the password field on a faulty CAPTCHA too and it should not specifically state that it was the CAPTCHA that was wrong while the rest were valid. Why? In case of using CAPTCHA — i.e. you are expecting bots to come knocking on your door and you wish to turn them away — ...


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As per my point of view, captcha and password fields are not related to each other. Because captcha means you are checking that details entered by human or machine(robot). First decide that what's your priority password or captcha? If you car giving constrain such like user can't login without correct captcha then there is no need to remove password field. ...


0

Well, in my point of view, if the user visits the homepage, he should be shown the Login window with a signup CTS just below or on the side. Obviously if the user hasn't signed up for your website, he won't try logging in at the first place and will instead click on the Signup button. The best example is facebook, the site with maximum number of users.


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Short answer The optimal user experience would be to log them into their account. Long answer However, one could put an argument forth that if the user realises they just tried logging in via the wrong screen, they would instead expect to be presented with an error message as per your first point. The reason for this is that most sites use this approach ...


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From a user experience perspective, I would say that you need to fix the triggers first before you solve any other problem, because you might be trying to solve the wrong problem. Clear triggers mean users have clear expectations about what will happen. So I guess you have some options: Have a separate Login link and Register link Have a simple Login ...


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If you wish me to log into your site from work, you need to provide a way for me to do it without risking my Google or Facebook password. I may not trust my employer to not be spying on me. There are also a small number of people that don’t have an account on Facebook etc, or who does don’t remain logged in and will not type there “important” password ...


7

I'm not sure about data on desktop design, but I can say that for mobile devices, people will often use the social media login option when it is presented. This article about mobile interaction and behavior tells us the following: SOCIAL LOGIN: While roughly half of the people who participate in our research say they don't like – or want – to make use ...


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For your specific question on which social logins to use, it depends on your users/market. However, Facebook is by far and away the most important one, followed by Google. Then a mix of Twitter, LinkedIn and Yahoo.


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There may be some behavioural insights (or behavioural economics) research into this, but I would suspect the questionnaire first is a better way to go. My thinking is that you can start initially by collecting their name and email address people may hesitate to upload a photo if it's the first thing they're being asked to do people are more likely to add ...


0

Email confirmation to me is more inclusive to users but also slightly more lax on security restrictions?....like checking an ID to get in somewhere vs. checking an ID against a list to get in (email verification). Agree it may come down to how your brand wants to be perceived and how you view security.


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It seems as though the main objectives you have are to get users into the system with the hope that when the product will support them, they will actually use it. So, my advice would be to: gather the absolute minimum amount of information required to create a user (perhaps username/email/mobile number and password) begin with most restrictive questions ...


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Obviously, with registration, there would be a bit more fields to fill in, and the user would have to scroll down to register using social media, even though we would prefer it if they would register using social media, so that we would be able to retrieve more data about them On mobile apps, user should be able to perform all operations quickly be it ...


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It all goes with your business needs. If you want your user's information, then it would be better to include your own login first, and social login as last resource. If you want less friction, user's information is no problem for you and want just some kind of simple user identification, then give preference to social media login. Additionally, I see ...


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The solution can be catered in a slightly different way to solve such issues. A simple layout like this would solve quite some issues. Mobile designs require careful usage of space. Illustrative approach for such can help simplify and beautify app designs. Description about the layout: The social login buttons can be arranged horizontally instead of ...


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If you prefer users to register using social media, then you should definitely put those choises on top. It will gently push them to use it. To me, it is confusing that you call the manual account creation "Mobile, Username or Email". I would just let the user fill in email (or username if that suits your system better).



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