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105

We should not ask for password twice - we should ask for it once and make sure that the 'forgot password' system works seamlessly and flawlessly


65

No! You can't send "forgotten password" links to a single account if you have the same e-mail address, unless the user specifies a unique username. But what happens if the user forgets the username as well? Then you need to reset password on all accounts associated with the e-mail address.


63

Answering you question, which doesn't involve specific motivation behind it. Yes, people don't like to register on sites, people don't like giving information all the time, people don't like remembering passwords and user names. This behaviour is common to everyone, but some groups are more annoyed than others and some are more radical than others; for ...


62

I'm going to be blunt. Any site that only allows me to sign up using FaceBook is a site I will not use. And I'm not alone in that - if you check out any of the debates on Spotify's decision to do likewise, you'll see a lot of negativity about the idea. If you want to use a third party provider, give a choice. Limiting it to one provider only is not a good ...


59

Here's a must-read article -- BestBuy saw a $300 million increase in annual sales via their online store by not requiring users to register at all to buy products (this means they would have to enter their address, etc. every time they bought something). If that's not enough, Later, we did an analysis of the retailer's database, only to discover 45% ...


51

Facebook only? Don't do it! I would always give people the option for maximum chance of sign up. Sign up forms that allow for your own sign in and using another account don't have to be complex, although many do seem to be for some reason. Digg is a good example of one that keeps it pretty simple. You already said you don't know your customer audience that ...


46

Log in / out is more technical sounding than sign in / out. That said, I don't think there is any confusion with either one of them. The last time I looked at major sites using log v. sign it was a pretty even split between them. I would opt for sign in / out simply because it is more human speak. Regarding Join, Register and Sign up. They each have ...


45

Instructions on how to activate your account have beem emailed to you. Please check your email. The word "instructions" may be scary to some people. It makes activation sound more complicated than it is. I'd suggest changing the message to this: Almost done... We've sent an email to joe.doe@gmail.com. Open it up to activate your ...


43

Yes! There are no security problems. If two people share an email account, and one of them has an account on your site, either of them can reset the password on the account (since they both have access to the place where the "forgot username" and "forgot password" emails get sent). Both people have the ability to take control of the account, and that's ...


40

Fun Solution: Translate the entire site into Farsi with English at the top that says "Not Afghani? Select a new Country" Less fun solution: Put the top 5 countries that visit your site as the top 5 choices. People chose the first when they realize they will have to dig through dozens of countries.


40

Overall, I think taking users where they came from can be better. Usually, users register to continue their path to a certain goal. For example, Kate was reading comments to a news article, she thought that she has something good to say and clicked "Comment" (Kate's goal is to comment). Now the system asks Kate to register and takes Kate straight to the ...


40

All of them except "e-mail" and "Password". This is the minimum information you need to uniquely identify a user and allow them secure access to your site. The only other piece of vital information would be their address if you were shipping them something - but you can ask for that when they actually order something and not before. All of the other ones ...


36

Rather than asking them their religion, ask them which religion's holidays they would like to show. This both makes it clear why you need to know, and also covers plenty of alternative scenarios that just asking their religion won't: People who aren't of their countries official faith (e.g. non-Christians in US and UK) may want the official faiths holidays ...


34

A system should not store the user's password in retrievable mode. This could be done adding salt (a meaningless string of letters and numbers, which doesn't change) and then hashing the whole string before saving to a persistent storage. When the user signs into the system, the same route is taken to make sure that the password is correct. (password + ...


34

Yes - underhanded, but this is not a problem reserved for the web - it's long been an issue for print too. A couple of years ago, the EU banned pre-ticked boxes on shopping websites in order to prevent such issues as unintentional purchase of insurance or optional extras when purchasing plane tickets, for example. The legislation does appear to revolve ...


32

Like Roger says, ideally you can reset your password easily and securely, but there are certain times that's not an option. If you're not validating email addresses it's more important that their login credentials are correct; if they lose their password it might be game over if they entered fake email information. Assuming you have to have a password and ...


31

It's better to use a special one-time login url. Reasoning: You want to make the process as easy as possible to have the lowest drop-off rate. Sending someone a temporary password requires them to either retype a password that they haven't chosen, or copy and paste it. It also provides no additional security benefits.


30

Hiding information behind logins is really bad from the usability standpoint. Imagine you are a user who googles for a certain piece of information. Workflow on website without registration-wall: enter search-term into search-engine click on first result read question to confirm it's really relevant read answer Workflow with registration-wall enter ...


28

From English.Stackexchange: http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/5789/whats-the-difference-between-to-confirm-and-to-verify Verification requires external evidence. Confirmation requires a re-issuance of a believed statement. To use your example: 'Confirm user account' is asking the user from their perspective. 'Would you like to do this?'. ...


27

Put the most common countries first, as someone else already said. Also, consider setting an initial value based on IP lookup? It won't be right all the time, but it won't go wrong as often as your current method. :-) Definitely accompany it with something like "we need your address because... and have made a guess based on your IP address".


25

If the form was rejected by Server-Side validation, the password should be blanked out since it shouldn't be sent back to the client. This problem is easily solved with inline validation though, you simply shouldn't be able to submit a form until it won't be rejected, and then no form data will be lost. Passwords should only be lost in the rare situation ...


24

I would guess that users can't see why you require the country and so are picking the first one in the list just to get through the form. Perhaps you need to explain why you need this a bit more clearly. I notice you have: Please tell us where you live so we can show you books that are available to you at the bottom of the form, but this could be easy ...


23

I like the way Microsoft handles this in Windows 8. There is a single password field, and a button that displays the password while it is held down. That way, the user can check for typos. If the user enters their password with great confidence, then there is no need to enter it twice or look at it, but people who want to see if they typed it correctly can, ...


22

Let's say the user just cannot receive email on their mobile device - for example those that deliberately do not want to be contacted by email - those on a limited data plan - or those without the inclination or technical know-how to setup email. For whatever reason, there are going to be people who fit that category. So ask yourself if you want to ...


21

While I agree that having "too many options is not a good UX", I would not say that having 4 or 5 options is too many. Your question also somehow suggests that you need to have your own sign-in procedure, or a standard one. I don't see why you could not have a combination of both. Look at how this very website does it: You have a clear choice between a ...


21

I'm not sure we can we specifically answer the question with the information given, but below are some ideas of what to do and what not to do that may help you determine the best course of action in your own scenario. Automate the sign-in after sign-up. I really dislike those sign-ups that gather all the site needs to use an account then redirect users to a ...


21

Where is the best place to ask the user their ethnicity? Honestly -- in the doctors office. Unless the benefit to the user is clear then don't ask for it. You wanting to keep track for your own records isn't clear benefit to the user. If it turns out that a user sees value in telling you their ethnicity (like in a doctor's office due to ethnic ...


20

Users come to your site to complete a task. You should make this as easy for them as possible. Registration may be a necessary step from your perspective, but for users it is an annoyance and an additional step they have to take in order to complete their task. If you then direct them to a welcome page that makes them lose their context and adds little ...


20

Stripe.com (a payments processor) offers an even more "immediate" sign-up process - they allow you to skip it all together. Any guest can begin using their dashboard and begin customising settings, testing mock transactions and making customer profiles before entering any sign-up information. No username, password or email. It's only when you want to go live ...


18

If a trial required me to enter these details before beginning the trial, I turn the other way and would not use the product at all. There is no good reason to gather these details in advance other than to increase the chance that the user will forget about the trial and get an automatic bill. I have all too often installed trial software and forgotten about ...



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