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12

Try to use the Yellow Fade Technique (YFT), nifty way to make a spotlight on recently changed area. But the YFT can be indicated also for a case where the items are recently edited or updated. Its also used here in stackexchange. Next moving into another solution, where you may highlight the items with different color BG making the items prominent that ...


11

Proper feedback is one of the most important parts of creating good, intuitive UX. Leaving it be would provide very little feedback and may cause confusion among your users. From my experience in UX testing, the majority of users don't retain the information presented on many "one time" notifications, so its likely that this won't be the most successful ...


7

For the most part the pros/cons of this come back to the classic Adaptive vs Adaptable interface argument, where Adaptive interfaces automatically adjust based on user interaction, and adaptable interfaces allow users to manually tweak them. A problem with this in particular is that text size is an accessibility issue. Not everyone has the same eyes, so ...


6

Personally I like being in control of things and dislike more or less anything happening outside of my control, such as a page refresh or new item listings. At least I as a user needs to get the impression that I'm in control. Talking to my team they are of the same opinion as me. So implementation of SE notification of new activity and Twitters new tweet ...


6

Let's search for an analog metaphor: the seismograph. Seismographs are those little devices that show when there's an Earthquake coming. Their operation principle is simple: there's a piece of paper which is moving forward, and there's a pen, which is fixed on a spring. When the Earth shakes, the pen moves, causing the pen to move sidewise. There are two ...


6

I'm struggling to understand the rationale for this feature to start off with.. Why on earth would a user take out their smart phone, find and then open up the app, find and select the appropriate function (assuming there would be various functions in this app), interact with it to open/close the window and then wait for a while for it to take effect? When ...


4

Don't refresh without user interaction Section 6.7. of the W3C's Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 (published 5-May-1999 already, mind you) states: Ensure user control of time-sensitive content changes. Ensure that moving, blinking, scrolling, or auto-updating objects or pages may be paused or stopped. Back in the day, that mostly meant ...


3

It is hard to make it readable for fast frequencies. And even if you do it well, there will be a frequency limit for every user. So you will either have to limit/funnel the speed, or accept that all tweets are not going to be read. Instead, an idea could be to divide them in two parts: A flowing view for visual effects, with mini versions of the tweets, ...


3

The YFT Yellow Fade Technique is a nice way to highlight a single updated item, however it sounds like you could have multiple posts updated, and once the yellow has faded you will need another UI signal to show which posts are new. Other ideas to highlight updated posts in the grid: You could use a thin orange border (1-2px) on the left of the post. ...


3

Most email shows unread email by using bold titles, and read email with normal titles. This might work in your case, too. Depending on the size of the grid, you may want some other way to announce that there are issues (with changes) that need attention, such as putting the orange ball (like the badge used in some applications) in a fixed location on the ...


3

You could use the same idea that Facebook does with notifications. Show a message indicator as a dropdown menu which is great if you want to to track multiple to-do lists. Or show a list of recent changes since last visit on the home page. If the changes occur in real time also take advantage of the title tag so that people could see if something happens ...


3

Yes, it most certainly does apply to web products. Whenever something in the backend is happening without the user's knowledge and they are waiting for it to happen, and they get no notice, that's when the frustration kicks in. When ever anything autosaves, take a look at what some applications do. A great example of this is Evernote. They don't have an ...


2

Nice Design :) Coming to how you can show the content, I would recommend a combination of both using a loading animation to inform users that the new bid is being fetched. So it might look something like this Pulling in new bid from the server This informs the user that a load is taking place. Once the latest bid has been loaded, you could change the ...


2

In the case of bidding, history is relevant. I would add a ticker div on the page. Initially the ticker is hidden. When a new bid comes in, the ticker pops out a little with a message "New bids have arrived". The user can expand the ticker to show exactly what the bid change was ("+$105 on Wuesthof Knives"). As new bids come in, the ticker pushes them ...


1

A good great example is the Google Drive message: It updates automatically when the user changes everything on the document. It allows to the user to be informed about everything is happening on the background.


1

While page-refresh (or request), database locking and async can be technical solutions, I think that all three options are a little bit near-sighted. Always manage expectations and tell the customer in the checkout process how sales tax is calculated, that it is subject to change and that there is an actual (support rep) person on the other side working on ...


1

Short answer: make it modal; the Sales Tax module is doing something systematically different than the Customer Order module. They should be displayed separately. So my company uses account management software that (as you would expect) has dozens of screens that do and show different account things. On several of those screens we're able to see ...


1

I love iMessage read receipts and typing status. They let me be sure when people have read things, and they mean I can read a message and, if it doesn't require a response, not respond, while letting people know that I've seen it. It's very useful for organizing logistics, and eases the pathways of conversation. On the other hand, I love that Tinder doesn't ...


1

The total estimate you are giving is a huge number of colors for the user to be able to recall and even distinguish to make any sensible overview of the data they are seeing. And I don't think that at any one time you will have more than, say, 20 colors in one graph in most use cases. And if you will, the graph will become illegible anyways, so what is the ...


1

The second option, with a clear but not abrupt transition is better because it makes it obvious the change is happening, rather than forcing users to consciously think about what they've done and what the result of their changes will be. One way to get the message across would be to animate your change, as seen in this example which uses the ZingChart ...


1

Whether you hide or display the old graph, neither method really helps the user visualise the change. Either way, you present the new graph abruptly leaving the user to work out what changed, if anything. Ideally you should be indicating not that there is a change going on, but also what that change is relative to what was there before. To help the user ...


1

(B), but only if you make it very clear that information is being updated. A different colo(u)r scheme like in your example works well. You might want to display 'updating...' close to/instead of your spinner. Bonus points if your graph animates from the old state to the new! (while subtly hinting that updating succeeded.)


1

I've struggled with a similar problem and fought against the auto update feature simply due to development cost and potential confusion for the users. When the user is hovering are there updates being queued up? When they un-hover will all of the updates happen at once? What I see most in live update situations is an indicator showing the number of updates ...


1

In Chapter 3 of Designing and Engineering Time by S.Seow there are list of standards which consern time and user experience. In average, "user real-time" response is in interval of 0.2-1.0 sec.


1

There is some research that has gone down in this field. One is the Rethinking the progress bar, where researchers found that halts in the process; where the user couldn't see that anything was happening, was detrimental for the perceived time of process. Even though two processes took the same amount of time, the one that displayed more feedback of what was ...


1

As a tech demo it suggests many benefits. Most of the answers here seem to be concentrating on the negative impacts of what happens when you bring the device closer to yourself, thereby decreasing the fontsize, but I believe the benefits of this system are when you come at it from the other direction - how to present content to users viewing it where their ...


1

Not only is this invasive, raising numerous privacy concerns it also limits user choice. We shouldn't ever do anything that removes user choice. It's also based totally on assumptions about the visual acuity of the viewer as well as their preference of text size. It isn't sensible to make assumptions. There are tried, tested and accepted methods of ...


1

I see this type of responsiveness as having niche use where the user has little control over font size e.g. in an operating theatre where the surgeon is moving around the table and away from/closer to the screen


1

I think this kind of thing creates more problems than it solves. On web UIs I assume the user has set the browser font size to a comfortable size for general reading. I use the user set font for the bulk of the text content, i.e. the main reading font. Other font sizes used on the site are derived from the user set font (that is set with units of *em*s or ...


1

imao, Twitter approach is okay. but, how about a "new" hybrid approach ? It can be like this: Include the fact that if the user is scrolling down/up the list/posts or not. If user is that active, DO NOT auto-load any; only show the number of new updates on the top of the page (but scrolling along with page) so that user stays notified but don't get ...



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