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Yes write fewer text. So, this seems very unhelpful at first since I don't even know your scenario, but believe me ... or don't. This is a screenshot of a random Wikipedia page. Can you tell me now what this page is about, alternative names for it and its primary market competitors? Probably not. And you're not even stressed out. So what to do? Write a ...


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The first thing to get out of the way is: your reader will either be skimming and hopping through your document, or they will be actively fighting the urge to skim and hop. To successfully guide your audience through the page, you'll need to minimize these temptations, and make your intended approach more or less irresistible. Eyes can't be "Forced," and ...


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There's is a lot of research around that explains the way a reader's eyes naturally flow when reading, so you may find some of that useful. One of the things you're doing, based on your example image, is mixing your layout even within a page, and that can be quite disorienting for a reader. Also, I would argue that the right page is the way it should be ...


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An important point I would like to add is to have a soft shadow and a black outline on your text. The default subtitle font on one of my older televisions didn't have an outline nor a shadow and it made it very difficult to read the text. Without an outline or shadow With an outline and shadow Source: Lights Film School


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No, Arial is not used just because of its ubiquity (at least not by publishing/communications professionals). I remember while doing a lot of publishing work in the early to mid 2000s that we were instructed to use Arial or Verdana (both Sans Serif fonts) when authoring content to be read online. However, if we were publishing content for printed materials ...



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