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2

Interesting question. About Mexican currency formatting I was curious about the Mexican way to use an apostrophe as a separator so I've done some research, discovering interesting things: If you google the sentence quoted in the quote ("In Mexico: 1'234,567.89; for million separator an apostrophe is used") you come up with only 47 results. The most ...


2

The designation of a sum of money should be formatted according to the conventions of the language (and culture) used in the context otherwise, i.e. in the application, document, web page, or other context. E.g., if an application uses French as the user interface language, then any sum of money should be displayed according to French conventions, no matter ...


1

Yes, the Oxford comma improves readability, but it's no panacea for careless or odd composition. Like any other great power, it can be used irresponsibly. Some of these examples here are red-herrings, precisely because there are several good ways to improve understanding, regardless of the commas. There are problems you shouldn't try to solve with the ...


0

An en dash is recommended when working with a range of values (wikipedia.com). Of course rules are made to be broken, but generally this is a good rule of thumb to follow. It's also worth noting that "there should be no space between the en dash and the adjacent material" (thepunctuationguide.com). Therefore a range of time should resemble the following: ...


19

I think the top-voted answer is only partially correct... The Oxford comma can resolve ambiguity OR create ambiguity, depending on context. This is the reason that grammar experts and style guides disagree on the use of the Oxford comma - sometimes the Oxford comma helps, sometimes it actually hurts readability. Consider the following examples... "I gave ...


0

Objective evidence strongly suggests that the Oxford comma does not consistently and universally help readability. By this, I mean that there is a strong cross-Atlantic difference in the use of commas in general and the Oxford comma in particular: modern American editors use them much more often than modern British editors. (I have no idea what the rest of ...


0

Foremost, I think we need to recognize what an Oxford comma is. It's only used in the case of lists of at least three items. All of these use-cases about parents' names are absurd and wrong, regardless of your grammatical background. Your parents, Bob and Alice, never have commas after the first name. If it's a really big deal, you could replace ...


8

In the olden days, the written word existed principally to allow reading out loud. The comma indicated that the reader should leave a very short pause before going on to the next word. That pause is almost imperceptible, but it affects the way the hearer understands what has been said. The Oxford comma is no exception. Without that pause the list is ...


1

Yes, certainly it would in that case. Funny, I've never heard about the Oxford Comma, and it would look to me very awkward. In most languages placing the comma before 'and' is an error. But even if it would look awkward, it would make that given example readable. It took me a plenty of time to understand what that post is about. While date set for ...


49

Yes. The Oxford Comma increases readability. When items are logically separate, putting a delimiter between them makes their separation visually obvious. Without the delimiter, the separation can still be determined, but it is not obvious. The Oxford comma removes the requirement that the reader figure out whether item n and item n-1 are logically ...


0

Consult your company's style guide. In my own writing I always use it because I think it improves clarity. In my business writing I never use it because the companies I've worked for had style guides in place that specified not to use it. Don't have a style guide? Not gonna make one? Then just pick a style and be consistent. (And have as many coworkers be ...


2

An ampersand rather than a comma would help solve this and work in menus and lists where commas wouldn't. Ampersands are used as replacement for "and" with company names, common abreviations etc that are intended to be read as one phrase. So "Services & Support" is more clearly a single option than "services and support". Of course if you're relying ...


3

If I look specifically at your example of that list, I'd avoid using that type of serialization entirely, if at all possible. I'd use a simple unordered list and put those below each other in a text. If you need to use inline serialization, you should try write your sentence to avoid the ambiguity entirely, or at least the serial comma. In this case, I'd ...


15

I think the key is in how it sounds when read aloud. When people read a sentence they normally "hear" it as speech with their internal voice (theories on this originally based on Lev Vygotsky's work, and there are even indications that this inner speech has an accent). A comma translates to a pause in speech, so I think readability will be improved if the ...


3

Another aspect to consider is screen readers: an En dash could be actually read as "to" instead of "hyphen" or more likely, if you use a normal hyphen, it won't be read at all. Although apparently current screen readers are not very proficient in this matter, they might improve in the future. If you use consistent and typographically sound glyphs now your ...


9

The correct use of em and en The em dash (— U+2014) is used to indicate a sudden break in thought ("I was thinking about writing a--what time did you say the movie started?"), a parenthetical statement that deserves more attention than parentheses indicate, or instead of a colon or semicolon to link clauses. It is also used to indicate an ...


5

You are correct. You should ignore the Technique 2.2.1 and only use Guideline 1.4.3. The reasons are as follows: Technique 2.2.1 is only a suggestion. As you point out, Technique 2.2.1 is “open to change.” It’s listed in a 14-year-old working draft that apparently hasn’t gone anywhere, and for good reason, as the remaining points will illustrate. ...


1

You mentioned number range. Are you interested in areas besides time? Ultimately the key point is "What do the users expect?" and "Are the users "expert" users in the system or casual visitors?" One can make an argument that people will absorb information in an expected format. Secondly context matters - is it clear what the grouping of numbers is for? And ...


12

More readable in what context?. There lot's of evidence that readability depends on multiple variables. Keeping in mind this impact of external factors, then one hyphen may be more readable if the UI is higher density of elements, and the other would fare better with a lower density UI. Specifically in the case of store hours it is likely more important to ...


3

Your example uses the time formatted in the english style; in continental Europe we would use Hyphen: 10-21 Dash: 10–21 In this example it is clear that the hyphen could be confused with a minus sign. I don't mean that it is easy to enter this confusion on a time range; but there are cases where it is really easy, for example temperatures. UPDATE: ...


5

Chicago Manual of Style (15th ed.) says this: Hyphens are used in compound words and to separate characters. En dashes: "The principal use of the en dash is to connect numbers and, less often, words. In this use it signifies 'up to and including'..." Em dashes are used for a number of things, but not to indicate ranges. Therefore, use en dashes. That's ...


0

Higlight importants word in each paragraph with bold I don't think this is a good idea: it makes the eye jump and disturbs the flow of the sentence. A text document isn't a website.


1

This depends on who is going to read your report. Personally, I've made the observation that most tech-people appreciate the fact that you've written your report/thesis using LaTeX. It's been quite a while since I've last used it, but it was great fun as it's kind of programming (no WYSIWYG, but compiling "markup"). In the simplest version it does it job ...


1

I think the most compelling argument for these types of layouts is that they are used specifically for sites that want to tell a story. They are narrative in nature and progress naturally from top to bottom with scroll in easily digestible chunks with lots of space for large impacting visuals. Some of the examples in this article from Smashingmagazine.com ...


1

As with "web gradients 2.0", "tickered text", overly animated sites or the paralax effect, it's trend. However, "divided content" also fundaments on that people don't care if they have scroll longer pages, as long as they get to the part they want to read. Less clicking and carefully selected text in each "divided content" means that you're less likely to ...


0

Page sections with different background colours are not optimised for readability. Instead, they are designed to generate enough user interest and get them to click that 'Call to Action'. A landing page visitor 'scans' the page, scrolling to the bottom very fast. If you put in too much text there, the visitor is likely to bounce. So the words are few and ...


1

Another personal opinion: Think of it as a (perhaps animated) multimedia magazine experience Colors, fluid/animated and fullscreen / big elements is just the thing for the moment Fullscreen adds some air/spaciousness to the viewing experience Colors make each page/section stand out more. And more fresh/vibrant as oppose to old and dry "texty" I think ...


0

Maybe someone else has a better answer than me, but in my experience this is simply a design trend that is being copied because it 'looks cool' and 'others are doing it'. However, in some cases where people put thought into their work it can be used to try and differentiate different sections on a page (e.g. Product Description, List of Features, Reviews, ...


2

While you present number ranges through dates, it's still important to notice that a dash is technically a double-hyphen: Dash A dash is expressed as an "em dash" ( — ) in printing, is expressed in plain text as two hyphens ( -- ) and is used in place of a comma, colon or semicolon for greater emphasis. It denotes a major break or pause and should ...


4

Yes. I would prefer 00:00:00 variation because people are used to write time in this format so it is more visual.



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