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1

Another alternative for the Y axis label suggested by statistician Naomi Robbins is to place the label above the Y axis. This has the advantage of not having to read the vertical text and does not waste as much space. See the example in the top right chart. IMO the non-centered X axis in your mock up looks fine to me.


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I think that it's pretty standard to place an axis label centered with respect to the corresponding axis. So, your chart's Y axis label looks fine to me, but the X axis label should be centered, in my opinion.


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This blog post provides a downloadable pdf with colors and their code numbers. It also provides suggestions for readable color palettes. http://www.dmcinfo.com/latest-thinking/blog/id/8840/simplifying-ui-and-ux-design-with-color-cheat-sheet


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A few rules of thumb: I recommended providing at least two themes - dark on light and light on dark as some users may not be able to read one of the two. For light on dark, make sure the contrast isn't too high (e.g. use grey on black, not white on black). Make sure the contrast between the intensity of foreground and the intensity of the background is ...


3

If you want to consider users with special visual and/or cognitive requirements, it becomes quite complicated and there's no single answer. The W3C Web Accessibility Initiative's Web Content Authoring Guidelines (WCAG) provide a good starting point. That's probably the single most thoroughly-researched resource on web accessibility, though it's not totally ...


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I know a lot of people may scoff at the idea, but take a look at Twitter bootstrap for a guide. A lot of time and resources have been put into that project to make the defaults sensible and readable across multiple devices.


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If you are not concerned about beauty/ugliness just try to imitate the Windows High Contrast colour schemes.


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I'm still a HUGE fan of pixels. The problem however is that we're in the age of responsive design now. Unfortunately, Ems are starting to make more sense to me, even if I HATE what happens when you accidentally nest Ems or lose track of the base font-size. You could very easily end up with a font that's even smaller than you have now. Whatever you do ...


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If you are setting your body to 16px and body text to 11px, your resulting font size will be 68.8% of your body font size. Try using EM's instead and understand how PX, EM's & percentages work. Article on font units


2

The good part is you are trying to improve usability of long texts and use experements. The bad part contains some items: Breaking reading experience Indeed users' reading experience is formed (for years) from different media: paper, digital, etc., which don't use any artificial boundaries. Instead they have natural boundaries, like page size and ...


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No. For starters, the portion of the screen you focus on may not be the same portion anyone else focuses on. I am just one data point, but I generally focus on the bottom 1/3 of the browser window and this opacity mask would be annoying, and take a lot to get used to. You'd have to have eye-tracking software to put the focus on where the user actually wants ...



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