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49

Yes. The Oxford Comma increases readability. When items are logically separate, putting a delimiter between them makes their separation visually obvious. Without the delimiter, the separation can still be determined, but it is not obvious. The Oxford comma removes the requirement that the reader figure out whether item n and item n-1 are logically ...


37

The book On Writing Well (a great book,) suggests making things like these plural. In the book, he talks about how to avoid the gender problem when talking about men/women. (By calling them people.) For example, when talking about a specific user, instead of saying "when he clicks on the button..." you'd say "when they click on the button...", or the passive ...


35

I'd say the best two options are: 1) Display terms and conditions as long plain legalese text as usual, in a left hand column, but then summarise it in much shorter, friendlier, simpler text on the right. 500px.com does this really well: 2) Format the text in a legible manner. Separate it into linked sections with proper headings, good typography and ...


24

I think the top-voted answer is only partially correct... The Oxford comma can resolve ambiguity OR create ambiguity, depending on context. This is the reason that grammar experts and style guides disagree on the use of the Oxford comma - sometimes the Oxford comma helps, sometimes it actually hurts readability. Consider the following examples... "I gave ...


23

You could consider changing the wording of the values: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


20

Timestamps aren't meant for most users Showing friendly names such as 2 hours ago or yesterday can quickly provide context to the user as opposed to showing them 2015-01-27 18:54:03.259 Mixing both formats together will always cause friction (anything that forces a user to ask a question in their mind adds to cognitive friction). In almost all cases ...


19

I would say it has to do with the following reasons : Contrast : Studies have shown that black or dark backgrounds provide the easiest contrast and can allow users to read discrete information quickly without having to make an effort to discern details when in a dark environment (which is often the environment in cars) Darkness adaptive : Another reason ...


19

Apart from the answer given, I would like to mention one very important Use Case where the solution is nothing BUT shadows. Text on an image When you don't have control over the image on top of which you are writing text, you have to ensure proper contrast for best readability. A Big hero Image seems to be rage these days. A dark shadow is added behind ...


18

I don't deal in print, but I have read quite a bit about fonts in the past. Recent studies have shown that serif vs. sans serif on a computer display is not really what affects readability, even at lower resolutions. Print, however, is a different matter. The studies consistently indicate that in print, serif based fonts are easier to read. That said, some ...


18

There is no reason to force a user to read the terms and conditions first. It is not a legal requirement and it doesn't improve the UX. Don't do it. Legally they simply have to agree to the terms and conditions, and if they choose not to read them, then that is their problem. UX wise, what part of the experience are you trying to improve by doing this? ...


17

Yes. Jakob Nielsen did a study many years ago and found that users like reading text that's easily scannable. Scanning can save users time. During the study, 15 participants always approached unfamiliar Web text by trying to scan it before reading it. Only 3 participants started reading text word by word, from the top of the page to the ...


17

I feel like you have very different questions here. To answer your first question: is some research in regards to how font-weight affects readability? Yes, there is. First you have to understand that type/fonts are judged by their "readability" (how easily can words, sentences, and paragraphs be read by an average reader) and their "legibility" (how ...


17

Based on UX.Movement: Why Text in All Caps is Hard for Users to Read The reason of the worse readability of uppercase vs lowercase is the lower contrast of shape. Small caps still has worse contrast of shape than lower case, so it'll still be less readable. There is also some relationship with familiarity, taking into account that for sure more of the ...


16

You have a few options in terms of referencing pages... QR Codes URL Shortener Using full URL Search No matter which method you choose to use, you have your pros and cons depending on your site's demographic. QR Codes Using a QR code is great for the younger, more tech-savvy, users. They usually carry smartphones with them and can easily scan your ...


15

This is an interesting approach to this issue: “Terms of Service; Didn't Read” - http://tos-dr.info/ e.g. Facebook ToS:


14

How well a font displays on the web depends on how much hinting information it has had: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Font_hinting Font hinting takes a tremendous amount of time to do as the font must be adjusted at each size. The reason Arial, Verdana and other older fonts always display well is because they have been meticulously hinted. Verdana has a ...


14

Background color is convention. This (hidden) rule will be learned by user soon. But I also recommend to show tooltip when user tries to edit (clicks) read-only cell. Such explicit message prevents guessing or abusing on imaginary non-working functionality.


14

I think the key is in how it sounds when read aloud. When people read a sentence they normally "hear" it as speech with their internal voice (theories on this originally based on Lev Vygotsky's work, and there are even indications that this inner speech has an accent). A comma translates to a pause in speech, so I think readability will be improved if the ...


13

Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimal_mark In Albania, Belgium, Bosnia, Estonia, France, Finland, Hungary, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia and much of Latin Europe as well as French Canada: 1 234 567,89 (In Spain, in handwriting it is also common to use an upper comma: 1.234.567'89) In Brazil, Germany, Netherlands, Denmark, Italy, ...


12

For what it's worth - I tried a variety of timings myself and ended up at 3200ms for a two line message of up to about 20 words. But I also place a small dot (10px diameter) to the left, which is coloured according to message type (eg red/error, blue/info, orange/warning) and which fades out over the 3200ms. When the fade gets to 100%, the message itself ...


12

More readable in what context?. There lot's of evidence that readability depends on multiple variables. Keeping in mind this impact of external factors, then one hyphen may be more readable if the UI is higher density of elements, and the other would fare better with a lower density UI. Specifically in the case of store hours it is likely more important to ...


12

In some situations a drop shadow or stroke can be used to maximise accessibility and maintain the contrast ratio between text and the background. I have used this method once or twice when dealing with strict brand guidelines that demanded non-conforming colour combinations. It is mentioned as a technique for meeting the SC 1.4.3 (Contrast) criterion of ...


11

Keep it simple: Send to: User Admin Manager It is quite common in English to skip articles at all in titles, etc.


11

A common number I've heard thrown around for font size, the "new 12pt font for websites", is 16px. Nearly all modern posts I've seen on the subject suggest it or something very similar for desktop websites with more disagreement about a good font for mobile. For a full font-size list, Typecast has some good recommendations. To me, the best way to pick an ...


11

To me, the answer is yes, especially for dark themed sites. Here are some images from a site that I designed for my brother's roofing company. He wanted an all dark theme. So I gave him a dark gray background, some off white and gray body texts, all with darker CSS3 shadows. ( Small caveat: the images actually came out darker than the site actually is when ...


10

I've been scolded for using too much bold in SO questions, so I learned that... Using too much bold disrupts your natural reading rhythm, but some italics and bold can be helpful in appropriate quantities. If your text contains a lot of highlighting or bold, consider breaking it up into bulleted lists.


10

I have been researching over the years about the same thing (I want to write a kids book) I'm afraid I don't have links for you, just pointers: Small chunks of text at a time (4-5 lines, 7-9 words) The font should be bigger than the text here. 14pt perhaps. White space. Gutter space. White area all around the text and between chunks. Pictures if you can. ...


10

If you look at most languages they are from left to right and the basic concept of a chat is about mutual interaction based upon the person's previous response. Hence, your responses will be driven by the response of your chat partner and hence his response is placed on the left and your response on the right since your response is driven by what he has ...


10

This is most prevalent with hand-written numbers as some people draw their 1's like their 7's. The dash is used the differentiate the two from each other. With respect to this specific case, I assume it is for the same reason - because the number is along a curve the 7 could be interpreted as a 1, so the dash was added for clarity. I don't think I have ...


9

Place the ingredients above the instructions, possibly even in the top-corner of each page so that you can see the ingredients easily when flicking through the book. Cooking books aren't only used when the recipe is being cooked but when it's being researched. By having the ingredients at the top of the instructions they are consistently in the same place ...



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