New answers tagged

6

First, radio buttons can have a default. So, at issue here isn't the fact that a dropdown affords you a default selection and radio buttons don't. What you are doing by switching from radio buttons to a dropdown is hiding the other options from plain view. If you are using a dropdown list to hide options from users because you've assumed they want/need a ...


4

Are you doing this with the interest of the user at heart or are you doing this to benefit the business? If the default option is the best for the user, then hiding the other options in the dropdown is beneficial and thus not a dark pattern. Conversely, if the selection is for say payment packages and you put the most expense one as the default and hide ...


3

The radio buttons add cognitive load to the user and clutter the interface without providing any additional clarity. You can increase clarity and reduce clutter further with this approach: Enable: [] Administrative state [] Graceful restart [] Default route [] Multiple paths


1

To simplify and rephrase Samuel's answer: Use 1 checkbox if the choice is one out of two options. Or rather, a binary choice. Use radio buttons if the choice is one out of X options. Use X checkboxes if the choice is Y out of X options. This is actually not a single option with multiple selection options, but a series of options that you can select ...


1

The checkbox group implies optionality rather than default states. That would not be the right method to use if you want to show the user what the default states are. The first group using radio buttons is a better use. In iOS settings pages, they use toggle switches to indicate if something is enabled or disabled. That seems like the best way show this use ...


7

I would go with the rules of GUI standards and official W3C Web standards: Radio buttons are used when there is a list of two or more options that are mutually exclusive and the user must select exactly one choice. In other words, clicking a non-selected radio button will deselect whatever other button was previously selected in the list. Checkboxes ...


1

You would need to test each page, from experience users go for speed/ ease of use over consistency. Where the information in the drop down is extensive ( eg a list of towns) predictive lettering is really good)


1

Guidelines are not the same as standards. Guidelines will depend on the needs of the solution and there are no guidelines for the situation you describe. There will only be guidelines for Radio buttons, e.g. If there is a obvious default value then make this radio button selected when the page renders. As for the best solution, well that depends on the a ...


0

I would make all the responses buttons, including "Option not listed", which when selected opens a text input and makes the text input area active. That way, you have consistency in your view and the same number of steps that would be needed if you had a text input area. So when selecting the "Option not listed" response, the actions are: select; type; and ...


0

Your answer is two ( or three ) radio buttons. In your example, I would leave them unselected. I assume you are requiring them to choose one, so in this case, it's PERFECTLY acceptable to leave it unselected. ( ) Bill on the last day of the previous month ( ) Bill on the last day of the next month If you want them to be able to deselect it simply add ...


1

About the default non-selected radio button - whether it is a good or bad idea - I think it depends on whether you want to give the user the option (or not) to go back to the original state. If you want the user to be able to undo his/her action, then the radio button is a bad idea because there is no way to uncheck, otherwise it is a perfect way to control ...



Top 50 recent answers are included