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-1

Most modern sites nowadays uses option as checkboxes or toggle-able selects. Conventions are conventions and are bound to be overridden in the next upgrade, so to speak. The first scenario you mention and you don't like sounds like PERFECT. I mean, you're working with enabled/disabled selections, one option disables the other, the message is clear and ...


6

Don't make checkboxes behave like radio buttons and don't make radio buttons behave like checkboxes. It is perfectly acceptable for the radio group to have no default selection in some situations. For example, Microsoft's guidelines for radio buttons give the following examples: Don't have a default selection if: There is no acceptable default ...


0

Make the change option explicit Eg if option 1 is the existing choice and the are 4 other options Layout would be You current choice is Option 1 (x) Change to..... Option 2 ( ) Option 3 ( ) Etc Makes change explicit and reduces cognitive load How you choose to present will depending on your programming overhead(eg sort order etc) Also by making ...


0

I'm not sure I have understood your problem, anyway I see 2 solutions: Use a checkbox like confirm option 2, the user will be forced to check it (modern browsers will add a prompt if the required attribute is present) . This is seen on many website where you have to accept Terms of Service to complete an order, etc. Use <input type="submit" ... > or ...


0

If you need the user to change the selection, disabling the save/submit when the user wants to retain the selection may not be the optimal experience. Some alternate strategies would be: Make the button show Save, and then Submit so that if the user wants to retain option 1 there is an explicit confirmation. If the user wants to change to option 2 there ...


1

This is OK and acceptable behavior. BUT: common alternatives are: Allow the user to press save. Disabled buttons can be frustrating to users, and after all, there is no harm done by just re-saving the existing option. This also fixes an awkward case where the user selects Option 2 (enabling the save button) and then re-selects option 1 (do you then ...


0

Limiting the number of options as a determiner for which UI input method to use breaks the logic for these elements. Drop-down menus can be single or multi-select and if the intent is to limit the user to a single choice you should use radio buttons and set a default selection. Drop-down menus have issues with long lists of options as well forcing the ...



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