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6

You can do this, but be careful about appearance in a vacuum. It should be pretty safe for radio buttons as there will be several (or at least 2) in a group so the users can see that one choice looks more "selected" than the others. The trouble will come when there is only a single checkbox on a page or if there are several that are all selected. If they ...


1

We use something similar to that in some of our internal apps - especially those in which users have to make many selections. Taking out the check marks made the page "cleaner" and users like it. Now our sample size is small (around 30 users) and not representative of web users in general (they're finance professionals working extensively on internal apps ...


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It depends on what your user needs to be able to do. For example, the following cases would support responsive disclosure (hiding the options that are not needed based on the earlier selection)... the administrator wants to see what options are available to the normal user a new user isn't sure whether to pick administrator or not and wants to know what ...


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This layout could be seen to be confusing to your users. By using multiple choices you imply that they can be changed by interacting with them, when they cannot. So if you are not offering the functionality to change the options then I would avoid this design.


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When it's required, and there are only two choices, a radio group makes much more sense. A radio group allows the user to quickly see the available choices and select one with a minimum of action. Whereas a drop down requires at least two clicks: one to see the possible selections, the other to actually pick something. I'm not sure why you'd think that ...


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I prefer the checkbox, but I agree that there's some iffyness when making it required, and it's probably not wise to go with a three-state checkbox (empty, check, and box) because what does that even mean? Thinking of the SharePoint forms, there are two options for a yes/no field: Radios or Dropdown... Drop down may do the trick for you -- common control, ...


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What you probably need if you don't want to break any conventional UI design patterns would be to first have a radio button group that allows you to decide whether you want to choose just one or have multiple selections. Then once you make the selection it toggles the behaviour of options A-D into either radio buttons or checkboxes. download bmml ...


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Did you have a look at the Acer drivers download page? I think that approach could be a good example to consider. http://www.acer.co.uk/ac/en/GB/content/drivers What happens is: 1) you click one option in the first box. 2) a second box is filled with new options, of which you could select one option again. 3) a third box is filled with selectable options. ...


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Since you know there will be at most 4 per group, how about a drop down followed by a clickable hyperlink that reveals the checkboxes: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I feel like the change between single and multi-selection is more explicit to the user.


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I would go with drop down menus instead of radio buttons. Have only the first field active, then create an if-else statements and have the appropriate sub drop down menu load and unlock. But you could do the same with radios, personally just not a big fan of how they look.


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I definitely wouldn't put two different types of selection inputs on the same items. Even if the inputs respond display the correct number of selected elements based on the user's clicks, he or she will likely be confused about whether or not both methods of selecting the item is required. It would be better to just leave them as checkboxes because that ...



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