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126

I would like to advise you not to use Yes/No as radio buttons. It is advised to use sentence style labels in imperative style. Now, to answer the question in which order the options should appear, here is what MS UX style guide recommends: List the options in a logical order, such as most likely to be selected to least, simplest operation to most ...


123

If I saw that in an interface - I would assume only one item can be checked, especially before any had been selected. Only the wording of the title would indicate to me that multiple selection is possible. I think this design would lead to a greater than normal number of people choosing a single item rather than a selection of items. I don't see the benefit ...


70

Why won't you rather use a checkbox that says "include pictures"? A YES/NO is 1/0, therefore a case for a checkbox.


43

I use select when the user doesn't need to know all of the alternative choices available. Autosuggest is useful for a long list. Generally, they know what they want and selects save space. Example: Choose a "State" like California or New York. You would never use radio buttons. I use radio buttons when the alternatives matter. When I want to user to ...


42

There should never be just one radio button, as it breaks the user's expectations on how they work. Radio buttons are meant to allow selection of one and only one item from a set of several radio buttons. If you really want to use radio buttons, you could either go with this approach: () I like the following sweeties: [] chocolate [] lollipops [] ...


36

A checkbox should look like a box and not a circle. They are not check circles, after all. Subtly rounded corners, as others have mentioned, would be okay, but user interfaces have always represented a checkbox as a square and a radio button as a circle. The designers behind your examples are likely trying to be different, favoring style over function.


29

Maybe you can try a mix of usual buttons (to have a big area to click on) and the usual radio/checkbox controls. I wouldn't totally remove those controls because then you'd have to add text descriptions like "Select only one." or "Select multiple." You could also grey out the radios/checkboxes that they are just a subtle hint.


29

I am not aware of the available studies but here are a few thoughts. Horizontal display seem to be easier to visually scan for all answers since you have "Yes" on one side and "No" on the other. It also I think makes it easier for the user to check all the answers the same way; you just move your cursor down (check, check, check). So I am leaning towards ...


28

This kind of UI elements exists and is used in many applications even if differently. Facebook events Google calendar If well designed they are even more affordant than the usual radio buttons. The thing is, because of this affordance they seem "auto selected" so there is no need of a validation like in your example. Therefore I would say radio ...


26

First of all: why do you ask at all? Why not simply always send the gift card with the order? Who would object to getting more value than what they ordered? If you don't ask, you don't have your problem to begin with. Generally, asking fewer questions from the user results in higher conversion, so from that perspective, removing the whole question would be ...


25

Answer: No. Checkboxes vs. Radio Buttons - Nielsen Norman 2004 Radio buttons are used when there is a list of two or more options that are mutually exclusive and the user must select exactly one choice. In other words, clicking a non-selected radio button will deselect whatever other button was previously selected in the list. Checkboxes are used ...


22

A single button should perform an action, and not act as a radio button. If you want buttons to act as radio buttons, you should use a segmented button. There is established precedent for this in both mobile and web UI, so people are likely to already understand what they do. Additionally the design of segmented buttons shows that the buttons are ...


21

A checkbox should be square. As Cooper, Reimann, and Cronin wrote in About Face 3 (emphasis mine): Traditionally, checkboxes are square. Users recognize visual objects by their shape, and the square checkbox is an important standard. There is nothing inherently good or bad about squareness; it just happens to have been the shape originally chosen ...


19

I'm not a fan of horizontal layouts for radio buttons for four big reasons: As soon as you have more than two choices, it becomes difficult to see which label belongs to which radio unless you use a lot of padding. That can cause problems. Horizontal radio designs do not work if the line wraps. It looks like two questions. This means that you can only add ...


18

Martin, take a look at what jQuery Mobile has done with radio buttons and checkboxes. Here is a demo page: jQuery Mobile Docs: Gallery of Form Controls They give you two viable options that I think you'll enjoy. Keep checkboxes and radio buttons looking the same but making them have a surface area that is larger and more clickable. The new Apple iOS ...


17

Your assumption is correct, items ordered in a vertical list rather than a horizontal list or as a grid is a lot easier on the eyes to scan. The reason is quite straight forward, horizontal lists need to span a larger area and therefore the user has to move their focus larger distances which is tiring on the eyes. Same thing with grids, here the user has ...


15

In the original GUI guidelines from the Lisa/Macintosh, Xerox Star, and Microsoft Windows, check boxes are, as the name implies, something you can mark (with a check-mark) if you wish to select or mark it - or clear if you wish to deselect it. Each checkbox choice is independent of each other, in terms of their activation. Radio buttons, on the other hand, ...


14

There are a few problems with 'sentence' radio selections: When three or more radios are displayed, it becomes difficult to immediately pick out pairs of buttons and labels. This is a problem with checkboxes, too. Users read in F-shaped patterns, top to bottom, and find it harder to resolve multiple items in a row. Creating a readable sentence won't be ...


14

This is called a Segment Control on iOS and Segmented Radio Buttons on other platforms.


14

Yes, there is a convention: checkboxes = option for multiple choices radio-buttons = only one single choice among the options


14

Unless you can proceed without selecting (leave the field blank) one SD options, I would suggest you go with a radio button. Your layout remains consistent if you are using the same input mechanism for similar tasks. Making it easy for the user to proceed quickly. Radio buttons are faster (easier also in many cases) than using a drop down menu. The ...


13

If you have a default that will be true in most cases, you should consider using it. Otherwise, I would avoid pre-selecting radio buttons. The prime reason being that you have no way of knowing whether someone actually wants it selected or they just missed it. In addition to that, if your radio buttons are only a Yes/No question, then I would suggest using ...


13

The current option of check boxes and radio button in that layout is not a good choice. It looks confusing. There are a few ways you can handle this: Split it into two questions: 1. Do you like sweeties? and if yes, then 2. What kind of sweeties do you like? If no, then move on to the next question. Turn it into a dynamic/interactive question. Do you ...


12

It depends on what you want to do. :) Use checkboxes (or other toggle buttons) if you want to provide for applying several filters at once. If you want to use them for single value, then listen to @AndroidHustle regarding manipulating them, and only use them for single, independent, boolean values. download bmml source – Wireframes created ...


11

I agree with Anna Rouben's answer. However, my layout is slightly different... The goal here is to maximize readability and scannability. And this is the layout I've used for hundreds of questions in the past. A couple notes... Horizontal Radio Buttons are preferred when the options are short and concise and are guaranteed to fit on the line without ...


11

Checkboxes vs. Select: To replicate checkbox functionality (choose 0 or x out of n), you'd need to employ a multiselect element. There's a lot of research out there indicating that most users are unaware of how to select multiple items in a multiselect element. Radio Buttons vs. Dropdown: It really depends on your scenario. Scenario 1: "Please select ...


10

Keep it simple, make the search parse both datasets simultaneously and use a single input download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


9

Other than space and the number of options, there really isn't a big difference. One thing I do like about radio buttons is that you can style them to look like large buttons, which can be useful for touch interfaces. If you only have a few options, it would be much easier to push a big button than to push the little dropdown and push the little option. ...


9

I think you should put them under "Advanced" search options. By default, you should search both options without forcing the user to choose either one (or select one from many). A good example is Google, there's one text field and a"search" button, that's it... advanced users can drill down themselves.


9

It's your call whether it should be Yes/No or No/Yes. But it should be consistent across the entire app. This poses a concern for your reasoning because in some places Yes might be the default option and No might be default somewhere. Even though they are both within the same page / app. A good workaround would be to use verbs. Save / Don't save is better ...



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