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22

I disagree strongly with the accepted answer here (but I'm currently implementing one, so I'm biased). As for research/support, there's been a number of articles published on this topic, by Don Hopkins in particular. Check this video out, too. Here are some highlights from Don Hopkin's original study on Pie Menus: Seek time (shorter = faster): Error rate ...


15

The biggest advantage of radial or pie menus is their speed. To quote this article. Radial Menus Are Fast Radial menus are faster to access than list-based menus in every kind of pointer-based UI, including cursor, stylus, and touch. One big part of that is because every option is spaced at the same distance from the pointer. That’s classic ...


14

I have seen radial menus few times. I have tested a Firefox addon that arranged contextual menu in a circle. Also it was used in some computer games (Temple of Elemental Evil comes to mind when I think about it). It somehow didn't work. It is much easier to scan a list of options (your eyes move top-down) than options arranged in a circle (your eyes must ...


8

These are generally calledRadial menus or Pie menus. Radial menus appear around a touch/click target and you move to the section of the circle to make your selection. Radial menus are a design often used for tablets and touch. There's lots of research out there on radial menus: Modeling Hierarchical Menu Selections: Effects of Additive Factors The ...


6

I've seen a similar approach used successfully in pointer and stylus based input systems. It's called a "Pie Menu" or "Radial Menu". Radial Menus are a bit uncommon but they have very good Fitt's Law results Here's a great article about designing pie menus. Radial menus don't always have the "drag" control like your proposed menu, but it's been shown to be ...


4

I think Radial menus make a lot of sense in touch interfaces. The couple of places I have seen Radial menus in place include the now-Google-acquired Bumptop application and more recently on the Dolphin browser for the Android. Windows 7 has a pie menu too which makes sense since its going to be used in a lot of touch devices.


3

No. Radial menus do not express hierarchy, and no menu item gets parsed first (the two are not the same, incidentally). Research into radials (like, say, http://www.donhopkins.com/drupal/node/100 ) shows that seek time for any arbitrary element is generally consistent regardless of position. This isn't consistent with the premise that radial items are read ...


3

If you need to do multiple cards at once, I wouldn't worry about using the toolbar; it's how Photos on the iPhone does it:


2

Here are a couple of good blog posts to look at that have a great explanation of why radial menus can be a good way of displaying options to your user. Usability of Radial Menus Touch Means Renaissance for Touch Devices Basically they explain that radial menus can be a great way to display a right click type of contextual menu in touch devices. Once a ...


2

I think Stuart is on the right track. Also, if you have access to an iPad, check out GoodReader or Zen Reader, which, though not beautifully, do manage to deal with various functions applied to one or more items in a list. If you choose to stick with the button in the top right, I'd use a gear icon to represent a menu of different functions, but ensure ...


2

Would you need to move / delete / edit in batches, or would this be done individually one item at a time? If it's for individual items then you can possibly bring up a contextual option for each item by swiping that item to the left / right, or bring the menu up with a press-and-hold over that item. (if the mobile device is capable of such actions of ...


2

Firstly with Google Maps there are two routes to a location search box browse map If an location information is always displayed same place regardless of the route used to find it this is a UX win in terms of Consistency heuristic. Secondly note that in Google maps the linear menu changes. This means that a radial menu would alter. And thus any ...


2

I agree that it is too far from left-to-right. But try it for yourself: hold a bigger mobile phone or a tablet in your hand, and do that movement. You'll see it is too complicated and hard to do. With the circle (compass) positioning it is much-much easier, and more easily understandable. I would only try something like your option, if the whole ...


1

I believe this is a tangible control that has transitioned into the graphical domain, for better or worse. It's easy to point out the benefits using this as a tangible control. The finger can rest in the middle and quickly reach each of the actions , without the user looking, by choosing a direction. Using it this way the interaction will produce a small ...


1

I think it is actually too far from the bottom left to the other side. I would be inclined to try and make the swipe movement segments equal in length so that (for example in your case of the video), the distance from the starting point to either option is the same distance AND ideally, the distance from one option to the other is also a similar distance - ...


1

I suppose that by "side contextual menu" you mean the regular right-click menu that appears on the side of the place you clicked. Pie menus are nice, except that they don't work very well with text. Most good implementations of pie menus just contain icons. I've seen some with text-only items, but they very rarely look good. And I don't think I ever saw one ...



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