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52

Use either Responsive Disclosure or Responsive Enabling depending upon the standards in the format you're working in. Responsive Disclosure would mean first showing a radio button like this... download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups ...and then revealing the additional option in the whitespace if the user selects no, ...


25

I don't think this is about user intuition - it's much more about writing style and conventions. The norm in forms is that the heading serves a category label to the adjectives/nouns below. So Car Features should do the trick here. Another norm is to use imperative statements, but mostly for interactive controls (not labels), still you could also phrase ...


14

First: Hello. Welcome. Thank you for coming to see us today. Take a seat. Coffee. Put interviewee at ease. Then: "Tell me about the experience you had getting here today." It has no correct answer since the interviewer knows nothing about the journey. But the interviewee actually undertook the complete experience so should be very much in a comfort zone. ...


13

You could always use a Mad Libs style: I drive a [Color v] [Brand v].


11

I don't think either of these is the best option. Do you have to go with one drop down? I would prefer to see two. The first would display and the second would be hidden until the user selected either yes or no from the first. Once selected the second would display with the appropriate options.


7

It seems like you have a relatively simple problem in terms of what you want to ask your users, so why not ask it explicitly with four options (where I would emphasise the safest option for each). So Import and Append and Export and Append would be the most common options I presume. The other options can either be de-emphasised text, another button. So ...


6

If we're talking specifically about SE, I feel that the current system works well. There are a number of deterrents to downvoting lightly: You need a significant amount of rep to down-vote - nearly 10 times the amount of rep required to up-vote. This eliminates the casual, unafiliated voters, and the mischief-makers Down-voting costs the voter rep ...


5

Disclaimer: without more info as to what this is regarding, it's hard to say for sure. The following is based on gut feel. "I have a car..." feels more appropriate when it's contrasted with other sections, like "I have a motorcycle..." or "I have a bus...", perhaps with a top heading of "What kind of vehicle do you own?" That makes it easy to find the ...


5

I don't see anything wrong with using a partial sentence ending in an ellipses as a user prompt if the answer you're asking the user to input is a natural ending to the sentence fragment in your label. As you currently have it, the prompt and answers don't make a proper sentence: I have a car... blue Toyota Compare that with: My car is a... blue ...


5

It depends. If you have a conversation you have to use chronological order - otherwise people won't be able to read it with highly rated replies appearing before the text they are replying to. If every comment is standalone it's probably better to sort by rating so your reader don't have to read all the boring junk to get to the good comments. If you take ...


5

In theory it sounds nice and I have found myself there, especially when I am new to the community, why I was downvoted. However, it does not work for the system. If there are a total of 8 upvotes and 5 downvotes and 5 comments as to why it doesnt seem so bad. But, scale that up to 5,000 upvotes and 2,000 downvotes. Now you have 2k comments that might all ...


5

If you had the power to change one object/device/software application you use regularly, what would it be? How would you change it? I would then listen for answers to the 2 questions I didn't ask "why change it?" and "what will the implications be?" Everyone can come up with ideas but few people can explain them well and see the bigger picture.


4

One thing we always do is a design exercise that is abstracted away from the specifics our application. It tests the creativity and interaction design talents of the applicant. There are half a dozen different answers, and any are good, we just want to see thought process. The specifics of the test have to do with taking something with alot of values and ...


3

Sometimes, an answer is unsatisfactory, misleading or poor advice. Giving a comment could be constructive, but that's not always easy/feasible/wise. For example: Language. The user is not very confident in their writing (english as a second language) and they don't want to be embarrassed, but they still feel the advice given was bad. Gut Reaction. The ...


3

What StackExchange shows is that users expect chronological order, yet can be trained to accept otherwise. Besides SO heavily promoting non-chronological order as key selling point, it took not just me a while to get acquainted to, and still newcomers will reply as if order were chronological. Changing expectations and behavior worked well for SO, ...


2

I would like to propose using Structured Matcher pattern and its implementation. A Structured Matcher is useful when making choices from a small, discrete set of alternatives. It decomposes a complex decision into simpler decisions about relevant factors and then uses decisions about these factors to make the decision. I think, it possible ...


2

this may be too much of a desktop approach, but I would do it like this: You should present the choice of manual vs automatic as radio buttons. The options that are specific to the transmission type are listed underneath the corresponding radio button. Based on which radio button you select, the corresponding options will be enabled, the others will be ...


2

Yes, users waste time to post exist information. Question and answer boards were designed to contain knowledge to be reused, so it is not make sense that askers do not learn from exist information, and ask questions which are similar to answered questions. Duplicate questions waste time of users who answer questions. Users should create new knowledge ...


2

Why not use ellipsis to ask the user? When you end the sentence with an ellipsis, it looks like part of the sentence is missing. Ellipsis is mostly used to show the user the sentence is cut of. Here is an example of a question were the ellipsis is correctly used: Best aesthetically solution to overflowing data in a table


1

Have you considered using a drag-and-drop type of interface that allows the user to add and set the questions and then drag lines between them to indicate relationships and dependencies? It could make for a much simpler use experience than trying to create algorithms or expressions.


1

This is a tough one simply because you don't want the users getting thrown all over the place, and navigating to unnecessary areas that may not be related. The system itself seems like it is a really good idea. The solution I have may be something you have thought of, but make sure you are making keywords a big part of the help and "future" help. I see no ...


1

You can look to some services that try to detect when a user is going to leave a site, based on their actions or elements they click on, to try and prompt when to pose your question on your site. Another thing to consider is using analytics to identify your target demographic and do some surveying. Send out emails to customers looking for their feedback. ...


1

Comments look quite prominent in this design. That is fine if you want to emphasize discussion around the answer, but if the answer itself is supposed to be the main point of the site, I would make the comments smaller and highlight them less--perhaps removing the gray highlight or nesting it inside the answer. If you want to de-emphasize the comments, I ...


1

Why not giving to your users the possibility to use both of them ? Many websites are doing this and I think that it's a good idea ! BTW you could also suggest some similar questions of the Q&A section to a user sending a ticket so he might find himself the answer to his question.


1

A slight variation would be if you gave them not the exact answer in the multiple choice, but only words that describe/circumscribe the real solution and they have to choose three of them / drag them on the image to describe the correct word that you are looking for (car = fast + metal + gasoline). That still gives hints, but not as concrete ones as if the ...


1

Here is an interesting article that generated some interesting ideas on this: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/jledgard/archive/2005/07/28/444531.aspx In response to your specific questions - You could run a small sample usability test with a simple prototype on some users (as you've suggested) and take down your own findings. I haven't come across any specific data ...


1

I think the answer is not about having precise stats on suggested questions, but about providing the best exit points to your users in that context in general (known UX patterns). Suggested questions only being one of them. You can still ask "yeah but are suggested questions effective?". It still comes down to what your users are doing on a case by case ...


1

Since this is a quiz which can have one correct answer,allowing the user to keep changing his answer kind of defeats the purpose since I can keep shifting between answers until I hit the right one. I would recommend allowing the user to select his answer and then freezing it so that he cannot make a change. You also should let the user know at once with ...


1

You might consider using tabs so by default order your posts are oredered by rating, then allow users to switch to chronological order by clicking on the 'order by date' tab


1

Your analysis of the StackExchange arrangement is not quite complete. Arrangement according to voting only happens when there are more comments than will be displayed initially, in other words when there is a "show more comments" link. When all comments are shown initially, they are always arranged in chronological order. When you click a "show more ...



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