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21

Here's a slanty-design answer, since other answers have covered "right" ways to do it. If you must hide the phone number, instead of making it a purely punitive task to show it, make it just seem like an unintended extra step. Obfuscating the phone number and only revealing it when the user clicks on it is like dangling information in front of people. They ...


19

There is usually some tradeoff between UX and administrative information. In my somewhat biased opinion UX should be the priority. Ask yourself the question: "Would I rather have fewer less happy customers, but know more about them, or more happier customers and know less about them?" That is the essence of what you're doing, and unless there is some ...


10

In Edward Tufte's brilliant Envisioning Information (Graphic Press, 1990) he states the following, in regards to clutter, in the opening paragraphs of Chapter 3 Layer and Separation: Confusion and clutter are failures of design, not attributes of information. And so the point is to find design strategies that reveal detail and complexity - rather than ...


9

In Why You Only Need to Test with 5 Users Jakob Nielsen suggests: The best results come from testing no more than 5 users and running as many small tests as you can afford. However, rather than focusing on the number of users, it might be better to focus on the number and quality of the tasks: Usability test tasks are so critical that some people ...


7

The straight-out answer to that is pretty simple: It's in the nature of a prototype to be beneficial. If it's not beneficial, then you're doing it wrong... If it's not beneficial, then it's not prototyping by definition... When you start prototyping, you need to know why you are prototyping. You need to know what the benefits will be. If you don't ...


7

The disagreement between you and the user is probably due to different definitions of clutter. Characterizing and quantifying clutter first depends on the meaning you choose. Information Density Information density is simply the amount of information items per square unit of area on the screen (e.g., controls, words, sentences, icons, pictures, or ...


6

Firstly I don't have experience in this area of doing content analysis on such a large website, but I have some ideas which may help or at least give some inspiration as to how you can make them relevant for your particular situation. Consider if qualitative analysis can also help You mention specifically quantitave methods, but since you are also looking ...


5

A few possibilities come to mind: Heuristic analyses (requires 5-6 fellow HCI practitioners in order to be comprehensive) Validation against personas or behavioural goals (may not be reliable) GOMS / KLM analyses - basically your first bullet point (reliable, but doesn't uncover issues with IA or broken interface metaphors) Comparative assessment ...


5

You’ll find a taxonomy and descriptions of different ways of integrating qualitative and quantitative methods in the “Mixed Methods Procedures” chapter in John Creswell’s (2013) Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches (SAGE Publications). The chapter includes examples of actual studies. The book is intended for social ...


4

There are many metrics you could use: Completion time. Divergence from ideal path for task completion, or how many steps does it take users on average to complete a task versus the optimal method. Completion time of novice users vs. trained users (you would need two tests for each interface here). This would test the intuitiveness of your interface. ...


4

Definitions While researchers still argue about the value of the qualitative and quantitative approaches, their definition is rather universal and agreed upon: Quantitative - conclusions are derived by means of numerical analysis. Qualitative - conclusions are derived by non-numerical analysis means. There is also the mixed approach, which means ...


3

Although the article below from J. Nielsen doesn't mention ROI, wireframing or prototyping, its conclusion is applicable to your question: 5 users or so help to discover ~80% of the usability issues. Now it becomes a matter of product development process: testing the prototypes and iterating until the UX is right, before burning development resources, will ...


3

I think the best way is to look at the amount of time and effort spent in sprint cycles with and without these assets, but it is very difficult to do a study on this because I don't think many organizations collect this type of information, or if they do then there is no particular reason to make it available to people. Personally you also have to weigh this ...


3

In Content Strategy for Mobile, Karen McGrane writes about how analytics data can be used to identify issues with the user experience on your mobile site: Many organizations have been spurred to develop a mobile website or app based on analysis of their log files and search analytics. If you’re developing a mobile site for the first time, or looking ...


3

It's time to conduct a competitive heuristic evaluation. Your question has described most of the solution, so I'll talk about how you put those together. First, if you haven't yet, write up the main use cases for your IDE. If your use cases are too broad ("an experienced developer will maintain ~100k lines of Python code"), then you add in additional ...


2

I don't have a reference for this, but I would think that these numbers would depend on the size of the user base. For qualitative testing you need to have "typical" users. So if you have 3 roles your users can take you need at least 3 users - one for each role. In reality you'd want more than one, but this is your absolute minimum. For quantitative ...


2

An interesting parallel to your question is found in clutter metrics for automatic target recognition (ATR). I cannot provide you direct access to the research data, but there are plenty of papers available on the subject if you're so inclined. The problem of calculating an effective contrast for diffused targets in visual scenery is addressed. The ...


2

Tufte is, as @Corin quoted, the law on visual information, and is worth reading for the inportant concepts of how information - not pictures, elements or design items - is presented to a user. The core is to look at the number of elements that seek attention. The Yahoo example has many items that seek attention, whereas Google has fewer. There is also the ...


2

Personally, I would prefer to show the phone number and try my best to track interactions with it via various analytics methods: Add a hover event on the parent element that fires off once per page load when the user hovers on the parent element containing the phone number. This requires a custom event to be built in your analytics software, such as Google ...


2

This article might be interest to you A manual for effective online video placement To quote the aspects of the article which might be interesting to you : On-page video placement Front and center: Video can be the most engaging online asset you have, so make sure consumers see it and view it. The video should be visible when the page loads. ...


2

I think Virtuosi Media has covered all the obvious metrics - the one obvious one that I'd add is the general completion rate ;-) However since you say: I am in the process of building a tool to make some tasks easier than an existing application allows. Right now I am surveying users and receiving feedback but I want hard numbers. I find it vastly ...


2

I have used Donna Spencer's fantastic card sort analysis spreadsheet and find it to be a handy tool. She provides instructions on how to use it, and it comes fully loaded with formulas and macros. It's much easier to use on a closed card sort where you have provided users with the category names. On an open card sort, you have to use your best judgment to ...


2

Something else to consider is where the result of your usability report is going. How much work can the people downstream from you fix - and what will the effect of those fixes be? Say I run a test with fifteen people. After the first three I've spotted problems A B C. By the end of the fifteen I've also spotted problems D E F G. The problem is that the ...


2

I can only speak from personal experience, but I often run mixed-methods research that combines surveys and qualitative data. This gives you complimentary data such as "Quantitatively, users preferred Site A to Site B. The focus group explains some of the reasons why they preferred Site A."


2

However, it seems that in the social sciences the terms refer to the type of methods (qualitative being associated with words and quantitative with numbers) Not just the social sciences. That would be my expectation in the UX field - or any other come to that. The words have meaning - they're in dictionaries and everything ;-) Redefining them will ...


2

Pro There are analytical advantages to re-using users. If each user tries both the current and the revised software, then you can run your inferential statistics on the difference in each user’s SUS score (e.g., with a t-test). Such a repeated-measures (a.k.a., within-subject) experimental design allows you to detect smaller changes in the average SUS ...


2

Unless you have a large budget, alternatives to having a person (or group of people) parse the data are potentially complex and unreliable. Card Sort a Folksonomy Card sorting is a simple technique in user experience design where a group of subject experts or "users", however inexperienced with design, are guided to generate a category tree or ...


1

Have you looked at the tools offered by Optimal Workshop in their OptimalSort and Treejack? They offer a Similarity Matrix for identifying obvious clusters and dive into alternate pairings. Dendrograms to visualize content groups and the top labels by participants. Participant-Centric Analysis that produces different IA structures. I found that rather ...


1

Depending on how granular your mobile and desktop website analytics platform is you can try to fish around for cause/s of concern starting with: Check how long each session is on the mobile website as compared to the desktop website. This will show you at a higher level if people are spending same time on mobile as on desktop. You can try to clean the ...


1

Actually you are using humans for the evaluation of your novel UI, ain't you one? :-) I'm sure there are a few more humans with you that might be helpful for this task. The problem with you and the other humans around is that you know things about your UI that would slant the results of a naive user test. To overcome the IRB restrictions and the slant thing ...



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