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31

One might think of them as a progressive enhancement. As long as the QR code doesn't replace a traditional call-to-action, I don't see how it could do any harm. Theoretically, a QR code that points to a web site should be accompanied by a printed URL. Those who know how to use the QR code would be spared the trouble of typing in the URL. Those who don't ...


9

The most important part of the long term success of QR codes or in fact any form of 'recognition' technology will be closely aligned to the quality of the content you are directed to. Having used these codes recently in a case study for mobile context the main issue is where I end up. Almost all the pages I'm directed to are web pages and as I'm only ...


9

I agree with Patrick McElhaney on this one. As long as they don't replace the standard call to action, they can be leveraged - but the thing is, they're not really new in the US. They've been around for years and just never really caught on. The infosec weenie in me stresses over the (eventual) abuse of QR codes (if they ever catch on enough to make it ...


7

In Japan it's known by people and most mobile devices there can read it. In Germany most people don't know what it is. So I guess bad UX unless you have an audience knowing (and technically able) what to do with it.


6

There's no need to over-engineer a loyalty system - there is a really cheap and simple app for loyalty bonuses at every n-th purchase: Card and ink! A simple web search for 'Loyalty Stamps' will give you a wide choice of stamps to choose from. The main benefit of keeping is simple is that you avoid ALL of the downsides of trying to use technology ...


5

jackJoe brought up an interesting point in the comments: [W]hat will the bigger fish be that will make the QR codes as old as todays bar code? This is in the context of mobile devices. In my opinion, the future answer to QR codes is near field communications (NFC). You can have the same functionality that a QR code provides (links and URI's mostly) ...


5

The stats differ a bit but to sum them all up: they all say that about 50% know what it is, 1/3 have used, few use them frequently and most of the people who use them to go to a website. Helpful Info graphic Austin Wiliams presentation beqrious drupal pqr code project Also, they all show huge growth. So if its not the right time for your company now, it ...


4

I consider QR Codes bad UX in general, and a momentary fad. My main complaint with them is that they replace human-legible space with exclusively machine-legible space. The technology actually displaces human readability and makes the ability to take advantage of the information reliant on a specific interaction. This isn't to say they haven't been useful, ...


4

We use QR codes in manufacturing and to identify product parts and other information on pieces. I see this technology as a cheap alternative to rfid tags, and more importantly there are environments (like in a hospital) where you want to minimize electronic/radiating stuff, so QR codes are actually better. Maybe they will phase out in time as a ...


4

My guess would be that the 'butt-uglyness' of the QR code is actually what makes it stand out from all the other printed information. I suspect they'll be with us for a long time to come.


3

In regards to your mention of character recognition capabilities, you might have to consider that QR codes are more robust and thus better suited to scanning of information that plain text. Compared to a written word, the redundancy of the stored information in a QR code is higher. See this section of the wikipedia article on QR codes. This level of ...


3

For starters, I dont agree with your response that you don't have time to set up a domain name. It takes like 10 minutes and would be a worthwhile investment on your behalf since the domain name would be so much more easier to remember rather than a bitly link or even a tr.im link. My suggestion would be have a combination of both a QR code and and the URL ...


3

According to Comscore "14 Million Americans Scanned QR Codes on their Mobile Phones in June 2011", representing about 6.2% of the total mobile audience. http://www.comscore.com/Press_Events/Press_Releases/2011/8/14_Million_Americans_Scanned_QR_or_Bar_Codes_on_their_Mobile_Phones_in_June_2011 In comparison 4.6% of mobile users and 9.8% of smartphone owners ...


3

I think that the QR codes should be considered as a hidden feature or the little extra something that makes the difference. One need to know the target audience well, of course, and some user groups will know how to deal whith this very well and other groups will have no clue at all. One should never rely on QR codes alone, and additional information ...


2

I agree with Erikrojo's point: bad UX unless you have an audience knowing (and technically able) what to do with it. It's comes down to knowing your audience, and if they're technically savvy enough and aware of what a QR code is then it's a suitable call to action. I agree that's its something that's taken a while to catch on in America and Europe but ...


2

A QR code or an EAN bar code or something similar is fine, but in order to provide validation so it can't be faked, you need some server-side processing which links the user to his purchase. The rest of this answer is out of scope in terms of UX, but here goes anyway... The till receipt generates a QR code which contains data like the till receipt number. ...


2

Does your project have competitors? If no, you should choose variant for fastest possible delivery of your product to market. First users of your product will be so called 'innovators' and they will use it regardless of your implementation of QR scanner. But if yes, you need to analyze market - competitors' functionality and customers' expectations. Of ...


2

This is the most reasonable formula I've seen for sizing QR codes. It boils down to width = expected distance/scale factor (scale factor should be between 6 (largest) and 10 (smallest)). The following assumes that users are (worst case) 36 inches from the computer screen and that the screens have ~ 100 ppi. For your case this would work out to: width = 36 ...


1

For the scenario i guess you can go for a full stretch URL as a few have suggested provided you make your URLs as short and as readable as possible so that they are easy to read and understand and also mean no threat.


1

I don't think you should force users to switch devices. Instead, you should focus on providing additional ways to access content. This may be quite similar, but in fact it's different regarding perception and construction of the email. Thus, I would construct this email like this: [Go there now (button/link)] or scan QR code: [(QR code goes here)] ...


1

It will depend on how much information the QR code has to convey and how far away the scanner is from the image. This page has some calculations based on the number of elements in the QR code, the number of characters and the scan distance. So for a code with 45 "modules", 125 characters being scanned at 300mm you'd need an image that was 27mmx27mm square. ...


1

I use QR codes in my advertising because whether they work or not, I don't have a choice. If I want to include any kind of link tracking in a print ad, I have to use a QR code to do it. (The alternative used by TV ads, where they send you to URLS like TryFreeCollege69.com, look tacky as hell.) Of course, that answer could be extended to any of the ...



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