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Before we can define a number of colors, we have to define: What is color? Color isn’t a particular wavelength or property of light, it is a cognitive perception. Color, is a perceptual property, something that occurs deep inside our brains. So if we can't see it, it is not a color. As such, colors are defined based on perceptual experiments. Another term is ...


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I suspect this is partly function of utilitarian materials choice, as well as customer choice. Customers have certainly pulled car colour choices down to a narrow range of gloss or metallic colours. Cars are painted metal surfaces that are required to withstand weathering, power-washing, minor abrasions and so on. However, they're not usually handled. The ...


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Perhaps because cars were primarily designed to sit within & not to look at from outside and at close quarters. If they dazzled another car user on the road, well that was collateral damage. (Even in cars the internal trim is unpainted & matte not glossy.A car with glossily painted interiors would be crazy distracting to travel in I expect) Devices ...


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I believe one reason might be that shiny surface will reflect the light, making it hard for the user to see the screen. while a dull finish like matte won't reflect the light so much. In terms of taste and trends, i think the mobile phone industry has gone past the 'shiny and new' trend towards a giving phones a sturdy feel.


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Practical origins defined our tastes When car finishes became shiny (because they weren't always) [1,2] due to the availability of the required technology and paint materials, it was mostly for practical purposes - cost effectiveness, weather resistance, rain run-off, aerodynamics, ease of cleaning. Consumers found the attention-grabbing gleam of a shiny ...



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