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The lines are used with Gatso speed cameras as a secondary check of distance travelled. They are precisely laid in the road surface and the Gatso takes 2 pictures 0.5 sec apart. Whilst the Gatso will register the speed from the radar (and only trigger the camera if the pre-set limit is exceeded) the number of lines uncovered between the two pictures will ...


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It all comes down to the context between help and a helpful hint or supplement. If it's essential data or a label, above is clear and conforms to a vertical hierarchy. If it's an obvious hint like a phone number with a label above the field, infield would save space — especially on a phone. If a quick example can get the ball rolling for a user on a ...


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Yours is a typical case of help text - it is complementary. Complementary elements Complementary means that there is another visual element (label/placeholder) to indicate the nature of the field in a short and generic way, and the help text provides a longer and more detailed description. In your example, it seems that first time users will need the ...


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In your case it should be above, but consider redesigning your form Forms usually represent an overall workflow (the form) split up into micro workflows (each field). This is a simple but powerful way of thinking about form UX, because it helps you make a lot of decisions around how to lay out a form. First, the overall workflow needs to be clear. ...


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The main reason why the helping text should always be displayed after the input field is because people search for help only when something is going wrong or is hard to understand. Think about other examples and where the help button is placed. People that fill in those fields would go through the process of TRIAL and ERROR first, because it is known that ...


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Helper text really needs to be above the actual field. User needs to know what he's entering before he enters that. This is to avoid complicated glancing regime on the user's part. Top-down reading flow also feels more natural and is widely adopted. You would love to check this amazing article on this same topic: ...


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Help text is really important for novice user and if the form fields are really complex then it is required for everyone. Good design will be 'When Help is available along with the field'. Suggestive text is also a form of 'help' than tells user what kind of data to be filled. Example of form fields is given below,


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Don't switch for the sake of change If you have a user base that's used to seeing it above, it's hard to make a case for change. This is not going to make a big improvement in comprehension, so you'll want to do a lot of user validation before switching standards. OTOH, normal is good For the general population, below the field is a more common standard ...


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I strongly argue that help text should be something you truly need (all to often it's added out of habit rather than necessity, which just clutters the form and makes it more complex) come before the field rather than after (after all, if you need help filling out the field, that information should be read before you get to the field) combined into the ...


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It really depends on what your users want. Frameworks are available out there but as UX designer, you need to know about user group you are designing for and if they are comfortable with it after a user testing. The placeholder text outside the field is always visible whereas the one inside the field disappears or sometimes user needs to delete and write. ...


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It really doesn't matter whether the "help text" is above or below the field but what you need to make sure is that, it is closer to the field the you are describing about. Simply, it's fine as long as the user can recognize to which field the "help text" pertains to. Keep it simple.


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I havent found any articles or research which shows whether users like it or hate it but studies have shown that voice alone can be a frustrating experience at times due to the lack of clarity and affirmation of the task being asked. To quote this article Our research To answer these questions, we ran a simple user experience study on popular smartphone ...


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This is a great summary of why VUIs will never entirely win the day: [I]t's not that voice is useless. It's just that it is often a secondary interaction mode when additional media are available. It's much easier to pick out the desired item from a list when the list is displayed on a monitor than when it's read aloud. Voice is a one-dimensional ...


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A system design presents two aspects, the controls user needs to operate in order make the device or system function and the the domain user is operating in. The paper Domain Models for User Interface Design by David Benyon compares different valid techniques for designing the model, but clearly concludes The objects which users think about and ...


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Sorry I don't have tests for you but in the meanwhile let me start with this based on my gut feeling: 1) if your app for google glass supports or extends actions that are about on-the-go, contextual. I feel this it will provide a good user experience. 2) Average user might not be comfortable with the voice control / searches when sharing sensitive ...


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Hope that you already are familiar with Don Norman. I think your question/topic is closely related to Normans Gulf of Evaluation and Gulf of Execution. We always want narrow gulfs in UI. To accomplish that, we can work with Normans design principles. I think it all comes down to making UI's that has as low required mental model for the user as possible. ...



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