Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Use reputation (It worked for stackoverfow). Create some kind of frecuent client card or database. You can use the plate from the vehicle for example. Frecuent and honest clients could benefit from discounts and less control. And they are already familiar with the rules. They only need to be scanned randomly but if they are discovered cheating they might ...


1

One option which might help is to provide additional information, based on the answers given. For instance, at my local recycling facility, I often end up missing the drop off point for one type of waste while looking for another and have to do a second circuit of the facility to get to the correct place for that part of the load. If I were able to say what ...


1

Great question with some great answers. A few more options to explore: Incentivise the paid options with a bonus scheme. Advise the client to form a relevant partnership with a local business. Here in the UK there are many such partnerships. Buy anything from WHSmith and you get a voucher for a cheap meal at nearby McDonalds on your receipt. Buy anything ...


0

Whenever there's a choice to be made that can affect financial consequences, people can and will attempt to game it. What my local public waste disposal facility does, is make everything that requires payment a separate fenced section of the park, and everything that's free is in another part of the park. If you have paid materials to dispose of, you need ...


3

This is not an UX issue. Your UX cannot make up for the fail of the facility's/municipality's approach towards payment. The problem with honesty is that it does work both ways. If I deliver multiple categories on a Saturday, each of them pure (a heavy bucket of dirt in the trunk, and a matching load of garden waste on the trailer), I would neither want to ...


2

Just as a thought, if you knew how many times somebody had come to the facility, you could display something like: You have deposited [garden|mixed|..] type waste [n] times in the past [m] months It makes it clearer to the person doing the dumping that you are aware of how often they are coming. If they already feel a little guilty about doing whatever ...


7

Could the system be turned 180 so they are assumed to be carrying "mixed" unless shown otherwise, and pay at the exit? So, you come in, you take stuff to the people who would be charging you to sort, they look and see whether sorting is needed, and either start sorting, or give you a voucher to use instead of payment at the exit and wave you on.


0

It is well known that, in many cultures (especially America), a symbol of authority anywhere near the UI will inspire honesty. An official looking seal on the UI would likely lead to more honest users.


0

Do all the options need to appear on the one screen? If you had one screen with the options of "Mixed Waste" and "Other/Not mixed" (possibly utilising images like tohster suggested); then you could make those two buttons bigger and easier to hit and make most people take the lazy way out and select mixed all the time.


1

No amount of dishonesty on your part will make other people honest. However, we know that dark patterns work and I believe they can be used in a white hat fashion. -not twice on the same person (and if I figured out that you did, I'd sandbag my next load out of spite). The people you're having the problem with are your return customers, who have ...


2

Your language is fundamentally flawed. For one thing, if i can have more than two types of waste, i might not have the "majority" be any one type. For another, the term "choose waste fraction" is just nonsensical. I suspect that even with the wording clarified, though, the game theory problem will remain, and your best bet for honesty will be to either ...


144

This is a constrained behavioral design problem Observations It's similar, but not identical to, a tragedy of the commons problem where participants are able to use and potentially exhause a common resource (in this case, free disposal for garden waste). This is not a problem a UX can solve without broader systemic design, but UX can make a difference. ...


13

Even if I don't have any garden waste to take to the waste management facilities what is stopping me offering to take some for someone else and therefore having 51% of the load being garden waste? Do you care about volume or mass when doing the charging? Most users will not know what the mass is of the different types of waste they have in their car. ...


3

One major problem I see: What defines "most"/"more of"? Sample scenario, I have: 1x large trashbag of grass clippings. 2x 5 gallon buckets of paint. 3x boxes of batteries. I have "More" containers of batteries. I have "More" weight in paint. I have "More" cubic footage of yard waste. What do I select? How can I "dishonestly" select something that ...


18

Could a video camera feed of the car be included in the UI? This may encourage users to think that they are being watched, even if no footage is actually kept and inspected.


43

The point with these kinds of things, where you rely on customer honesty, is twofold. First to make the honest route easy. Second to make the easiest route as honest as possible. I would radically change the process and divide it in to two steps. First step/screen Are you delivering: ☑ Chemicals . . . . . . . . ☑ Construction waste ☐ (Scrap) Metal . . . ...


9

It is not UI problem but more general UX/business process organization. I see two steps here Customer should determine "majority" of the waste. Customer should honestly choose this type of waste. As the step one is poorly formalized customer always has incentive to choose the most beneficial. Say, driver has 40% of Garden waste and 60% of other type, by ...



Top 50 recent answers are included