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3

I'll answer your question from personal experience. I work for a large software company with dozens of XD designers (across different departments) and we do make extensive use of paper prototypes. We usually spend very little time creating the prototypes - but we spend more time testing them. In your example video... I think they are spending way too much ...


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In my experience: yes, but I would draw them on the computer. Prototypes that look hand-drawn have the following advantages: They look discardable. Stakeholders will not be afraid to tell you there's something wrong with them. Even if you spent three days drawing them, people will be happy to discuss changes, because it doesn't look like you poured your ...


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http://notableapp.com provides some nice functionality for what your suggesting. It allows you to host entire code projects, have users comment and commit changes and even expands into usability testing. Here's a better link - http://zurb.com/notable/features/code


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Sounds like you're trying to gather quantitative data from what's essentially a qualitative research method. I've only ever gathered usability information from usability tests. I'd expect low-fi prototypes to give even less-precise quantitative data than a finished system. But you can discover some very useful qualitative data with low-fi prototypes. ...


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This isn't one tool but two - Dropbox and Github. Here's instructions of how somebody else set it up: http://alexcican.com/post/guide-hosting-website-dropbox-github/


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You could try any of these, they're not UX tools but they'll display your HTML well enough and all have versioning and sharing. bl.ocks.org This is a simple viewer for code examples hosted on GitHub Gist. It's created by Mike Bostock and mostly used for showing d3.js pages. But essentially each page is just an HTML page with javascript - so you can ...



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