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31

What is the context of the question the user is answering, and what are the implications? This is the important question that helps guide the appropriateness of "Y" vs. "YES" (or "N" vs. "NO"). In this case you are dealing with a RSA certificate, which is a big deal. Accepting a certificate you don't mean to can have serious implications, so it is important ...


17

It's not an uncommon practice in children's toys to prompt after a suitable period - in fact it's not limited to children's toys either. But the things that make it annoying are if the method of prompting is itself annoying such as being a horrible sound rather than a pleasant sound, or by repeating it after every period of inactivity until forced to ...


8

I would argue no - this triggers alarm bells as to: 'what have I actually done?' and is not common practices with most software products. However Excel is a bit of a weird fish when it comes to this - it could be dependant upon the macros within the sheet, here is an interesting thread discussing the same issue. ...


8

Unavailable options shouldn't be hidden if they give context to other elements. If they are not needed for that purpose, they should be hidden. For example, here at SE, the large up and down arrows are always displayed because they inform the user that the numbers on the side are the result of voting. Without those arrows, the numbers on the side would be ...


7

There's a pretty good discussion about the subject at IxDA: Hiding and Disabling Menu Items. This links directly a post by Joel Spolsky titled "Don't hide or disable menu items", stating: A long time ago, it became fashionable, even recommended, to disable menu items when they could not be used. Don't do this. Users see the disabled menu item that ...


6

Unattended devices which promts users to do something through sound or visual effects is indeed annoying. It doesn't matter wheather it's a childrens toy or our latest hate object at home: the tumble dryer. It beeps every 15 minutes to tell you that it's finished until you acknowledge the alarm. It can be put off at start - but that feature is almost always ...


6

There are many reasons to avoid the prompt box. There's a good list in this programmers.se answer but here are the reasons it's not helpful: It's not customizable, full stop. You get to word your prompt and you can't even specify the wording to use for "okay" or "cancel," regardless of whether the prompt is for "Send Email" or "Kill my family". It's also ...


5

The value of confirmation messages is to give user a chance to stop themselves from doing a potentially wrong action on the potentially wrong thing under the potentially wrong conditions, so try to make the message only include the action, object, and conditions (if applicable). Thus, the most terse message would be the form: [action] [object] [condition]? ...


3

I recommend using hover affordance. For such a large UI item, you can cause a textbox to appear behind the element when you hover over it, encouraging users to see it as an editable element. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This works well for sites that have an 'edit mode' or similar, to constrain the distracting ...


3

This really is a legal issue as much as it is a UX one. Explicit consent / agreement is the only type that holds up in court. Putting the license in a text document and stating something like "by installing this software you are agreeing to the license" without the user having to explicitly accept it or check a box stating that they have accepted it, ...


3

Generally, I've understood this to mean that Y is the default, and if I hit something other than a Y or an N (such as hitting the spacebar, Enter, or even Q), it will use the Y option. You are correct that this implies that Y is the default, on pressing the Enter key. An input other then Y, N or Enter would generally product an error. Is this ...


3

When it comes to kid experiences you also have a second audience in the room, which is the parent, and they'll only ever here the repeating sound effects. They'll replace toys that annoy them, too. I would suggest you give a subtle visual prompt. For example, if the button looks like a flower, have the petals do a visual flourish but not necessarily force ...


3

Speaking from father's perspective rather than UX designer (well, combining it a little bit) I think it is great for educative toys to keep children focused on a particular activity, which is playing with the toy. The thing is that children at the age of 0-2 years often lose their attention atracted by some sounds around, other toys etc. In the same time it ...


2

Shorter but clear way of asking this is to remove the first part of your initial phrase: "___?" instead of "Are you sure that you want to ___?"


2

If no changes have been made to the document, it should close without dialog. This can be seen through a visual indicator that shows whether the current state is saved or not. This does raise the question of which changes the dialog is referring to. An example of where a solution has been implemented is in Linux, it tells you when the last change was ...


1

I will try to simplify : * Consider situation : User is allowed to upload multiple files. Solution for duplicate files : Let the users upload all files, allowing them to even upload the duplicate file. Once all files are uploaded, in your grid view, let the new same name files have a name format of "ABC(2).extension ". So user understands immediately ...


1

You should ask for validation before doing any operation that is irreversible. If all your operations can be reversed (e.g. you are storing previous versions of files and folders) then you don't need to ask.


1

I would say that as soon as the expected action of "uploading" is triggered by the user, you should inform them that there are duplicate files. This is the common behavior among various operating systems, and thus something most users will be familiar with. I would say the common "yes, yes to all, no, no to all, cancel" system would work great. Ex. ...


1

A more generic answer to this question might be that we are dealing with two different design considerations here: Firstly, we are talking about whether the question is more important than the answer, or if both should be designed to ensure maximum comprehension by the user. It seems like if the question is worded well it isn't enough to prevent the user ...


1

No, as there's nothing to save. Prompting to save would raise doubt in the user (why is it asking me to save? Did I make a change? I didn't want to make a change! What did I do!?) and that is not something you want to do. :)


1

To answer the general case: Without question - you do not prompt the user to save, if no changes were made. In fact I believe that is the designed and intended behaviour for Excel - despite what you think you see. As to whether the application thinks a change has been made that is a different thing - and a specific thing to the software in question. In ...


1

I think it depends on context but in general, why not display the action intended, only word, only with a question mark. Examples- 1. Exit ? 2. Save? 3. Cancel? 4. Etc.


1

One method that I've used in the past is to be explicit about how much time there has been since the last save. Just have something like '7m since last save' in a bit of the screen where the user will scan. We put it in a bar under the main nav on the left. We basically had three states: If it had been less than 5m we didn't show anything >=5m and < 10m ...


1

One of the ways I have seen unobtrusive messages appear (usually with attached action buttons) are the flash messages appearing at the top of a page. This is the type of bar that appears in Firefox when you first start it informing you about your rights I have seen this pattern being used on multiple websites and seems to be catching up. An overlay ...


1

When I have my developer hat on, I used to use them quite a bit since they were incredibly easy to implement. When I have my UX/UI hat on, I can appreciate the fact that they are quite limited in terms of visual presentation. That said, we're now using them quite a bit more again in our mobile web sites. The advantage on them mobile side is that the JS ...



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