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33

What is the context of the question the user is answering, and what are the implications? This is the important question that helps guide the appropriateness of "Y" vs. "YES" (or "N" vs. "NO"). In this case you are dealing with a RSA certificate, which is a big deal. Accepting a certificate you don't mean to can have serious implications, so it is important ...


17

It's not an uncommon practice in children's toys to prompt after a suitable period - in fact it's not limited to children's toys either. But the things that make it annoying are if the method of prompting is itself annoying such as being a horrible sound rather than a pleasant sound, or by repeating it after every period of inactivity until forced to ...


9

Unavailable options shouldn't be hidden if they give context to other elements. If they are not needed for that purpose, they should be hidden. For example, here at SE, the large up and down arrows are always displayed because they inform the user that the numbers on the side are the result of voting. Without those arrows, the numbers on the side would be ...


8

I would argue no - this triggers alarm bells as to: 'what have I actually done?' and is not common practices with most software products. However Excel is a bit of a weird fish when it comes to this - it could be dependant upon the macros within the sheet, here is an interesting thread discussing the same issue. https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/...


7

There's a pretty good discussion about the subject at IxDA: Hiding and Disabling Menu Items. This links directly a post by Joel Spolsky titled "Don't hide or disable menu items", stating: A long time ago, it became fashionable, even recommended, to disable menu items when they could not be used. Don't do this. Users see the disabled menu item that ...


6

Unattended devices which promts users to do something through sound or visual effects is indeed annoying. It doesn't matter wheather it's a childrens toy or our latest hate object at home: the tumble dryer. It beeps every 15 minutes to tell you that it's finished until you acknowledge the alarm. It can be put off at start - but that feature is almost always ...


6

There are many reasons to avoid the prompt box. There's a good list in this programmers.se answer but here are the reasons it's not helpful: It's not customizable, full stop. You get to word your prompt and you can't even specify the wording to use for "okay" or "cancel," regardless of whether the prompt is for "Send Email" or "Kill my family". It's also ...


5

The value of confirmation messages is to give user a chance to stop themselves from doing a potentially wrong action on the potentially wrong thing under the potentially wrong conditions, so try to make the message only include the action, object, and conditions (if applicable). Thus, the most terse message would be the form: [action] [object] [condition]? ...


4

I'd advise against asking "on initial startup." General consensus seems to be that users hate being asked to rate apps with a pop-up (regardless of the content), and developers risk negative ratings for asking too early, too often, or too intrusively. This is especially true: Right after start up, when the user wants to accomplish something When it ...


4

How critical/catastrophic would this operation be? Trivial: no prompt needed; rather, provide a simple undo button. Non critical or easily undone: prompt near the button, as to not annoy users too much and make them lose focus. Critical and can't be undone: centered in the page


4

This can be compared to the OK-Cancel situation Nielsen/Norman group described in an article: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/ok-cancel-or-cancel-ok/ Spoiler: there is no right or wrong. There are, however, a few things to keep in mind. First of all, make sure your choice is consistent. So if there are more situations like this, always put the confirmation ...


4

Although users don't like to admit it, they will make mistakes. Ranging from having the wrong mental model of what a button will do to a simple misclick. It is therefor important designers take these possible mistakes into account when designing software. Two good rules of thumb are 'always ask for confirmation when a users action is irreversible' and 'try ...


3

It all depends on the alert that is being provided to the user. If it is an alert with regards to purchasing and item (i.e. In-App Purchases) usually the "No" is highlighted as to prevent accidental purchases. However, when it comes to cases such as connecting social accounts or opening a link in safari, "yes" should be highlighted because of the likely ...


3

Generally, I've understood this to mean that Y is the default, and if I hit something other than a Y or an N (such as hitting the spacebar, Enter, or even Q), it will use the Y option. You are correct that this implies that Y is the default, on pressing the Enter key. An input other then Y, N or Enter would generally product an error. Is this display &...


3

This really is a legal issue as much as it is a UX one. Explicit consent / agreement is the only type that holds up in court. Putting the license in a text document and stating something like "by installing this software you are agreeing to the license" without the user having to explicitly accept it or check a box stating that they have accepted it, ...


3

I recommend using hover affordance. For such a large UI item, you can cause a textbox to appear behind the element when you hover over it, encouraging users to see it as an editable element. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This works well for sites that have an 'edit mode' or similar, to constrain the distracting ...


3

When it comes to kid experiences you also have a second audience in the room, which is the parent, and they'll only ever here the repeating sound effects. They'll replace toys that annoy them, too. I would suggest you give a subtle visual prompt. For example, if the button looks like a flower, have the petals do a visual flourish but not necessarily force ...


3

Speaking from father's perspective rather than UX designer (well, combining it a little bit) I think it is great for educative toys to keep children focused on a particular activity, which is playing with the toy. The thing is that children at the age of 0-2 years often lose their attention atracted by some sounds around, other toys etc. In the same time it ...


3

It should be in the following sequence: Retry Continue Reason: Retrying ensures that the user tries again to see if the Warning is now resolved and go ahead with a successful compilation. Hence, this is the recommended action to be first. Continue ignores the warnings and can be used on the second go if the Retry option doesn't work. However, the ...


3

This seems like a very bad idea: what happens if I want to add 3 hours and 25 minutes? or if I actually do enter the time in hours and minutes - If I enter 3.30 will it register 3.5 hours or 3 hours and 18 minutes? Set the format you want users to enter their times with and keep it that way: If you're asking users to enter decimal time then you should ...


2

Shorter but clear way of asking this is to remove the first part of your initial phrase: "___?" instead of "Are you sure that you want to ___?"


2

To answer the general case: Without question - you do not prompt the user to save, if no changes were made. In fact I believe that is the designed and intended behaviour for Excel - despite what you think you see. As to whether the application thinks a change has been made that is a different thing - and a specific thing to the software in question. In ...


2

If no changes have been made to the document, it should close without dialog. This can be seen through a visual indicator that shows whether the current state is saved or not. This does raise the question of which changes the dialog is referring to. An example of where a solution has been implemented is in Linux, it tells you when the last change was ...


2

Would agree with mc01. User's hate been asked to rate the app. But given this problem, I would follow as below. Keep the Rating link somewhere in the menu or feedback page. Also if possible, reward the user for rating your app. I believe it is a big deal that user took an extra effort to submit feedback/rating for your app. So maybe giving them few game ...


2

Don't do this. An unsolicited modal popping up and asking the user a question is just plain annoying, no matter when you do it. Asking why the user didn't purchase, in particular, is also an annoying question. It will come across as overly aggressive marketing. This modal would drive customers away. Also, as your question highlights, there is no ...


2

Definitely the first one: "Select your car model or add a new one". Maybe (when it isn't too long) you can optimize it to: "Select you car model or tap 'Add' if your car model is missing" The problem with the 2nd and 3rd version of your texts is that you require that the user does not find his model and so does not even get the idea to looking for and ...


2

User clicks on Save and system closes the popup? Yes. Show a feedback message on the screen behind as: Your changes are saved successfully! What if user accidentally clicks on Cancel button? Close the popup, but the feedback message on screen behind should say: Your changes are discarded. Undo The feedback messages / notification play a huge ...


1

Mental Models If you have a document in a box, then you open the box to look at the document, but take no further action and then close the box, the document hasn't changed. This is the mental model most people will have, other than superheros and Microsoft employees. So no... an application shouldn't ask users to save a document if the user hasn't ...


1

Depends a lot on the search and filtering options user has and needs to remember. The more is the thing for professionals and the less it is close to their main task (saving lives for example), the less of their daily brain capacity the UI should take. Very generally: A lot of filters, possible keywords in search, user does not use the terminology on daily ...


1

You need to provide some form of feedback to the user that the event date was cancelled. According to Lund "Every action should have a reaction." Jacob Nielson's first of 10 principles of user interface design state "The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time." Alan Cooper calls ...



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