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15

In your experiences, what has worked well, and what would you make sure you never done again? Works Well: Be a designer who develops AND a developer who designs. White board concepts and solutions with developers as you either flesh out features or solve technical solutions. Be willing to bend and compromise and stand up for your ideas. Expect ...


5

In my primary dayjob such projects are usual. And they are really the mess, and the experience is worth a book :) But I'll try to be short. At first accept in your mind that huge projects can't be perfect when you are alone warrior strugling. This will save your spirit from depression and months of nightmares with ugly controls and prototypes (I had). But ...


4

Now If you are working on a managed project, there should be Design Requirements, which should give you a foundation to build from. During development there is much in transition, but approved design documents can assist in creating help info. The final stages of system testing and user acceptance testing, should give you the chance to fine tune your ...


4

I've been involved with both approaches, and the Approach 1 has resulted in better final products with significantly less rework, but with two caveats: You have to provide comfortable lead-time for UI/UX designers, analysts, and users/product owners to do their part of the work. Mock-ups should resemble the finished product as much as possible, and there ...


3

You could create the "perfect" design when you have the freedom to do so. But the goal is usually not the design itself but have it build in real life with all it's technical constraints and with business goals to reach. You gain more support for your designs if you involve everyone that is part of the development process as early as possible. If developers ...


3

Here are a few links that might help with your research ... http://www.adobe.com/enterprise/pdfs/Forrester_Best_Prac_In_User_Exp.pdf http://www.useit.com/alertbox/user-research-methods.html http://www.useit.com/alertbox/agile-user-experience.html http://www.thinkingandmaking.com/view/agile-ux-six Hope that helps. Have a great day.


2

Back in '97-98 I helped a major management consulting firm launch their first intranet. We did a lot of stuff wrong, but one thing we got right was the company directory. Each employee entry included a picture, phone number, email address, office location and area of expertise. We also allowed employees to edit their own profiles. Regarding your situation ...


2

Before you start to work on a solution, you need to fully understand the system and truly what the issues are. There will be users with years of experience it would be worth getting their input. I would take some time to immerse yourself in the program. Perhaps get someone to give you some scenarios? I would recommend you create a survey which a large ...


2

Not familiar with Mobile-D, my expertise is more within the Scrum methodology. I think one thing to be aware of is that, being agile, user stories are not completed in a particular phase. They should be living and iterated upon as the organization learns more about the problem area as the project progresses. And based on that, I think the user stories ...


2

Some thoughts are: I think you could change the layout to minimize eyes jumps, grouping related information together To be more consistent: New Project dialog has New Solution title You have no label like "Select database" for your combobox, it decreases visibility and understandability of the control To make database selection more visible you could use ...


2

100% Meaning, UX is not a 'stage' in the project, but something that has to be worked on from start to finish. Admittedly, in pure waterfall methodologies, roles are typically 'slotted' into only one part of the project. This is why most dislike waterfall. ;)


2

I work in an an Agile/Scrum environment, so my answers might be skewed by that, but in general I dislike the large, up-front costs as described in your example. I'd rather have development start sooner and give more time for user testing on beta- & release-quality software. Given your same 20-week project: Prototype: 2 weeks This includes research ...


2

The goal of a UX process should be to create an interface that won't need help at all. It'd be so naturally intuitive and meet the desires and needs of the end-user that it'd be moot. Of course, that's rarely a reality we have the pleasure of accommodating. As such, sometimes a means to provide help is a necessity. As to when to start working on it, I ...


2

As soon as there is anything at all that you can say -- so, if not now, then very soon. "Anything at all" can leave place-holders for specific interfaces if they haven't been worked out yet; you can probably at least start writing your conceptual documentation ("what is a..." for the key things in your application), and you probably have some ideas about ...


2

It's quite an odd question, since stakeholders and/or sponsors usually fund and initiate projects. If the stakeholders are unknown, and you have no customer party to talk to, I don't think you have a project at all. But "methods for communication" with stakeholders - we have a lot. In the 1990's and before that the waterfall project methology was popular. ...


2

Well, you can't. If few weeks is all you have, and there is no UX related research, there is little you can do without missing anything important. Breadth rather than depth You'll have to try to focus on breadth (the surface level) rather than depth, since the deeper you go the more research time you need. For instance, to decide whether an action should ...


1

When I'm working on a project, I work with a core project team and stakeholders. Stakeholders may initiate a project, but they're not always involved day to day (or even week to week). Stakeholders may also be people who haven't initiated thee work but need to be consulted in order for the work to be successful. Normally, to engage with stakeholders, I ...


1

I can't say I have a definitive answer. But I can tell you what my guesstimate is. I'm only a developer, but I'm a "one guy shop" developer so I'm forced to learn at least a little about UX. So let's pretend you're the UX guy and I'm the developer guy... I should always have the final decision in everything. How fast something is built is pretty much up ...


1

Segregated processes (UX separate from UI separate from Content separate from Branding) lead to this. It's not uncommon. Good design requires a holistic approach and is why Agile and the like has become so popular. Everything effects everything and having everyone move in a direction together helps smooth that entire process out. In your situation, simply ...


1

Is it possible to redesign in smaller chunks. Rather than risking everything on one large redesign pick off the a quick win and get some runs on the board. It is always critical to start getting some runs on the board. If you can start showing some value being returned to the business you may be able to start pushing for extra resources and even the ...


1

Agree with the rest of the answers. One benefit you have with redesign is that you have and existing user base you can work with to figure out what user needs are, what they like/hate in the current system. We worked on a big redesign project and started with interviews and observing users using existing system. Observations were extremely useful since it ...


1

If possible, start with user research. Develop personas, scenarios and other artifacts first. This will help you discover which areas are the highest prioirty. Take a look at About Face 3 by Cooper et al. (ISBN 0-4700-8411-1) Cooper's Goal Directed design works pretty well to tackle user interaction and design projects. Also, take a look at "process" on ...


1

OK, so not strictly related to how to launch an intranet per se, but some of these recommendations will allow smooth transition and rapid uptake of the new intranet, which I think is tangentially relevant, yes? from How do approaches for UX differ between intranets and normal websites? there are a number of approaches or UX strategies you could employ, ...



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