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There are expectations at play — users have an idea of the form and would want to see button there, otherwise the whole component would seem incomplete/broken. Disabled button implies visually that user has to complete the form (correctly) before it can be submitted. By hiding the button, you are hinting that there is no such condition. As users know from ...


3

Hiding the submit button is not part of progressive disclosure. The only case where a submit button is not available upfront is probably within a Staged disclosure where there are a number of interdependent steps displayed in a wizard or similar pattern and submission taking place as part of the last task in the process: see below for distinction between ...


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In most cases this is not a good idea. It comes down to UX goals: The main goal of a credit card form is usually to get the user to complete a purchase. Error correction and validation is only useful if it helps you accomplish that goal. The Buy it now, Purchase it, or Complete purchase buttons are usually excellent opportunities to display a clear ...



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