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0

It seems like your app is a lot like an antivirus software. Like mentioned before, you might want to just have a text only indicator. If you're really set on a progress bar, perhaps do a marquee first to scan the tree up to a certain level to scan for the number of "main" branches, and then use that and hope that it works good enough. You could also ...


1

Here's my suggestion: you cannot know the size of the ENTIRE tree in advance. However, you do know how many objects are directly below the root, and once you scan one level deep, you also know how many objects are in the Nth object directly on the root. combining these 2 things, you might be able to use a dual progress bar setup, where you have 1 progress ...


2

How about making the length of the status bar grow as well? That way, progress goes up even when percent done goes down. [###-------] |30%| 3/10 [####----------------] |20%| 4/20 [#####---------------------] |19%| 5/26 It's easier to think about it as two status bars: "work completed" overlaying "total work." The ...


1

YES! A progressbar shows the best-available estimate of completion. Ideally it would move entirely smoothly and the progress should finish at exactly the moment it hits 100%. In reality progress estimates always suck and progress bars are jumpy. Please, for the love of life, try as hard as you can to be honest with users. Give them the best available ...


0

Without a good way of estimating, you are better off not estimating - rolling back would count as a form of bad estimate, and should be avoided - perhaps instead display the number of elements processed and a time taken, and allow the user to do the logic of "When I did this last time, it had 10k elements, this time it has 15k..."


1

Based on the additional information from the comment, the following situation seems to apply: You do not know the total number of nodes on all levels of the tree. You know the number of nodes in the tree down a given level (say, the root level). Just showing the progress within that known number of nodes down to a given level will not show enough ...


8

Are you performing a depth first traversal? When processing a node do you know how many children it has? If so then one approach is, for any given node assign equal weight to each of the children. An example: When examining the starting node we find it has two children: 100 / 2 = 50 so each of these is assigned 50% of the progress bar. When examining ...


31

If it is possible to traverse the entire tree before beginning processing, I would display an indeterminate progress bar while you discover the branches and then switch to a traditional progress bar once you know the maximum value. If you cannot identify the total size of the tree before processing, then a progress bar may not be the best option. A ...


5

In terms of the particular type of design pattern you are dealing with, I'd say that you are looking at indeterminate progress bar designs. These can be a bit tricky since they generally tend to be very basic, but if you want to provide details then they need to be accurate and not confusing to the user. My suggestion is that you can probably show the ...


1

Some research I recall on progress bars had found that if the display of progress just pauses or slows down this would be reason for user concern and their perception of elapsed time would increase. As per other answer displaying the number of units completed is positive. As is displaying number known items so far. Indicating rate of units completed per ...


1

I do think it is weird to go backward. If you just need something basic and visual, you could specify that the progress bar is only updated when it shows advancement. That may result in fast initial progress and then jumpy progress after that but many progress bars work that way anyway. You could alternatively show the two numbers (45 completed / 345 ...


2

Another alternative is using Tab, that can you enable or disabled depending of the context. In this example you enable/disable the Step 3. http://jsfiddle.net/V7GTY/2/


1

I don't know what your time restraints are or how advanced a solution you have time for so let me give you a couple recommendations: 1) Breadcrumbs. As the user goes along, the list of steps populates. If they don't need to do a particular step, don't even show it. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups 2) One form. ...


3

Why not simply putting all of the registration process on one single page instead of having severals separated steps ? In my opinion the advantages would be multiple, the user would be immediately aware of how big is the registration form, and of what informations they need to fill it. For example, when the user comes to your registration page, you could ...


1

I hadn't seen this before, but it seems that somebody mistakenly used what is being used as a progress bar indicating page load to indicate page progress. I think it started since iOS7, although I had seen it in other sites, where this pattern is exclusively used for page load, which I think is very slick modern and efficient. As others mentioned, this is ...


1

I would call it something like a "reading progress indicator". I enjoy how it gives me gradual reading feedback as I read. There are some issues, however. It is true that the element is redundant provided that scrollbars are always visible. It has become more and more common to hide the scrollbars when not in use, however. Personally I don't like this ...


12

As some people already pointed, the way this UI element used on that particular site is redundant. As it not giving any value, and just replicates the native browser scrollbar information. I think it's just wrong usage of this element. I think, I thought this effect first on the YouTube. And it was used to show that there is a new content is loading via ...


1

Two sites that I felt did an amazing job at this were: http://www.comcast.com/x1 For the X1 platform. As you scroll, you can see the bar progressing but it also adds indicators for what section it's on too. Then there's the MapQuest one: http://mobile.mapquest.com/#intro This one is a vertical indicator but love how moving to each step really loads ...


1

I would basically consider that a simple fixed-nav overlay 3 column layout: http://bradfrost.github.io/this-is-responsive/patterns.html http://www.adtile.me/fixed-nav/ But I really like the red scroll-progress indicator at the top of the fixed nav, that's a nice touch, both thoughtful for the user and helpful on devices where the scroll bars are not ...


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"Scroll Spy" generally refers to a top or side navigation that dynamically changes as the user scrolls down the page. I think scroll spy is specific to dynamic navigation, but maybe something like "Scrolling Progress Bar" is fine. Here is a fiddle that may give you some more insight with JS and CSS. http://jsfiddle.net/sarathsprakash/PvVdq/68/


1

I've seen a very similar bar in a mobile video game once, used to denote the player's progress until their next level. The main interest is that it is extremely compact, the main downside is that you need to figure out yourself what it is for (so only use that when there is no ambiguity as to what might be progressing and when the user can live without ...


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I like to use a mixture of the spinning circles with a status If there are a lot of tasks for the system to complete then it's worth thinking about including a counter with the spinning circles Checking (Task 1 of 574) Loading Modules - This may take a minute or two (Task 521 of 574) I would rather know something is going to take 20 minutes ...


1

I know this is bringing up old news... But curious question... Wouldn't you rather see that the progress has halted, or is supposedly going to take more time, rather than a rotating wheel or indeterminate bars? I personally would prefer to know something has stopped working, or my progress has been halted due to download problems or such other factors. A ...



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