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0

Idea is to show 'best' in a subtle way


4

Take a page from video games and treat your personal best streak as a high score. Classic games like Pac-Man show your high score at all times as a goal to reach, and when you achieve it you get to see both numbers change at the same time to reinforce the fact that each point is setting a new record. More recently, Diablo 3 offers increasingly ...


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"You do what you can do," the saying goes. In your case this means informing the user of the information you have. The wait period is useful information. This is especially true if the user will be using this process frequently. Obviously, the main progress bar should display the overall progress. You can't use a second progress bar if you don't have the ...


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Your graphic seems to require far too much information to describe what it means. Github does this through a table of Longest Streak next to Current Streak. It is easier to understand with just text. To keep it compact you could remove everything but the most important information: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


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I think you should look at the use of bullet charts/graphs, which is an enhanced version of bar graphs commonly used instead of dashboard gauges and meters. Characteristics of the bullet chart allow you to a lot of information in a small amount of space, and are cluttered with useless and distracting decoration. The bullet graph features a single, primary ...


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**Here are two alternative ways to represent ratios ** Using a high watermark line. This allows them to contrast their all time best with the current streak while also affording them to see some minor trends in their performance. A risk is them not understanding the high watermark which a screen overlay the first time might help them out. Apples health ...


4

Is there a reason you're doing a ratio of "current streak" to "longest streak"? I don't know why that would be helpful to the user and encourage them to continue with their habit change. Do you want to go a more aspirational route? The user is either going to be 1) In the middle of creating their longest streak or 2) working towards meeting their longest ...


0

As said by all don't put job in sleep state just to show smooth transition of progress bar. UX is not about only UI components of your app but it is how your app delivers delight collectively from all perspectives and efficiency is one among them. Your developers (or you) has done a great job to finish a task in less time so don't let UI components affect ...


4

Very valid question and a UX Challenge. I think it can only work with a workaround as what the device manufacturers have done with the battery indicator. Personally, in your case, I think you could work with progress bar and a text as below: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

I think it really depends on the behaviour that you want the users to adopt, and how these exercises relate to the goals and tasks that the users want to accomplish. From what you have described, the five exercises seem more like a checklist of things to do, and they don't have to be done in any particular order so I don't really see the progress bar ...


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Here you have 3 options. In the first sample, you have 2 states with "voids" that are filled as the tasks are completed The second sample is useful if your tasks are numbered in an amount sequence (x amount of tasks completed) and the order doesn't matter Finally, the easiest and most clear option: a big number with progress status. Straight and to the ...


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in your graphic examples, a faded (like 10-20% transparency) version of the filled in graphic indicates that something belongs there, but it's not complete. When each activity is done, more of the shape is filled in solid. It's pretty obvious when 0% has been completed. This also has the advantage of playing on the desire for completeness. (which is why ...


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Opening Interesting question. Let's see what we can do. Don't make them think Let's take color out of the equation for the moment and think about solid shapes. We can use the gestalt principals to somehow differentiate 5 sections. If the section is outlined, it's "empty"--if something is empty, we usually consider it to be not finished. If it is full of a ...


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Don't compromise. Have two animations that are optimised for their own purpose: An accurate animation showing the progress of the task. For example, the bar filling up from 0% to 100%. Then, an aesthetic animation marking the status change from 'in progress' to 'complete'. For example, a green glow surrounds the bar, then fades after two seconds, while a ...


2

Don't forget that a progress bar is merely a feedback tool to indicate to the user that something is actually happening, if a task is taking longer than a second or two, and no UI changes are being shown. Twenty years ago, in the days of Macintosh System 6.0.5 and prior (or if you were from the other side, Windows 3.1), processors were not fast enough ...


0

If a task happens instantly, give it a quick yet smooth animation. If a dozen of these happen at once, all the bars can animate smoothly at the same time. I would recommend using a smooth curve so each starts slow, speeds up, and ends slow, but I would recommend the animation only lasts around half a second at most. This way it appears smooth but it does not ...


1

This is a question of mitigating the overheads in a job with many small steps. The problem is a progress bar flickering between 0 and 100% for each of many little files. I have a similar issue in one of my own SPA apps which has a bootstrap loader (which loads bootstrap among other things). jquery-ui is huge, dozens of helpers and polyfills are not. The ...


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I was thinking in a similar line as @Yako: Do not slow down any tasks, but think on what gives a nice user experience separately. My suggestion: Don't slow down the task, slow down the bar Just let your tasks run, and measure their progress, but rather than displaying the updated progress immediately, do something more smooth. For example: define a ...


1

I think the correct answer to this depends on your user's expectations. I had something very similar: I had a varying number of process that would run. I only had an overall progress bar. All the jobs would complete before the progress bar could even be displayed. The users left comments like, "I ran it multiple times but it never did anything." My ...


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Similar to @DaveAlger's method, I would add that you could color the row as well. You would immediately know at a glance what has finished and what hasn't :


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I would not slow down the job for a smoother animation. How does this look: 1) Can you try and use a circle loading and stay away from numbers all together. I am assuming lthings move very fast. Maybe you can show feedback only when there is an issue. Advantage less clutter on screen. 2) Instead of making 4 loading bars can you just make one for the main ...


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Root Level Progression I think a better approach if your sub tasks are completing very quickly would be moving the progress bar to the root elements. Or outside of the table completely (if it's an option) which also gives you the ability to use different icons if a sub task fails etc.


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I would hide the progress bar once a task is completed. Progress bars communicate to the user that something may take awhile so maybe you could hide the progress bar at 100% and even change the word to DONE. If all the tasks start out as DONE then awesome I have to tell all my friends how fast you are!


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I think that a perceptible progression may be a good idea after all: If it jumps straight from 0 to 100, did it really work? Wasn't it a bug? However, it's important not to actually slow down the job, but only its perception by the user. So, here are a few features I would likely implement in that case: an animation of 100ms between each step (so ...


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No, don't slow down the job. There's nothing wrong with having something be instantly 100% done. Your app will actually seem better than if you slow things down so that the progress bar animation is visible. Users would love nothing more than to have everything happen instantly.


2

I don't want to go to far out on a limb and speak for all users here, but I'm not sure I would ever choose smooth progress bar animation over faster running task. I would be perfectly happy to see a task take basically no time, in fact when I am watching an install or other staged process, I love it when one item zips right to completion, going directly ...



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