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5

Start by figuring out where you are, and where you want to go Without a clear view of what your UX objectives are, you're likely to end up just wasting time and money on UX. Step 1: figure out your objectives and prioritize them For example, are you looking to use UX as a branding vehicle? Increase conversions and signups? Increase sales? Reduce ...


5

It's absolutely acceptable to ask the user about the experience, during debriefing. Here is a reading on running a usability test that mentions various approaches. This reading is from a very useful website…. Usability.gov is a practical resource for usability methods and templates. I believe it's government-funded. Back to your question: if ...


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How Do Users Perceive This? People are uncomfortable being forced to take action. (It triggers the reactance response.) When a user is forced to take a specific action to receive information they have normally get "for free", it will create animosity. There is an Amazon discussion with many users who find the "Too Low to Show" implementation to be a ...


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This can be compared to the OK-Cancel situation Nielsen/Norman group described in an article: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/ok-cancel-or-cancel-ok/ Spoiler: there is no right or wrong. There are, however, a few things to keep in mind. First of all, make sure your choice is consistent. So if there are more situations like this, always put the confirmation ...


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It should be in the following sequence: Retry Continue Reason: Retrying ensures that the user tries again to see if the Warning is now resolved and go ahead with a successful compilation. Hence, this is the recommended action to be first. Continue ignores the warnings and can be used on the second go if the Retry option doesn't work. However, the ...


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How to observe different roles "An installation job usually has around 2-3 people working on different jobs (roof crew does installations, ground crew does prep work, etc). How would one conduct a CI with so many different roles?" Option 1: Recruit help and have multiple people observing the different roles at the same installation. This might be good ...


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One technique that's been helpful in our work is to break the processes down into successive levels of detail. Show each level with a reasonable amount of detail. Then, break down any step that doesn't have enough detail into its own diagram. For example, mapping the process to "Get ready for school" might look like: Even without going into any more ...


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You could make it interactive using some simple javascript code. Check out tree diagram block on d3.js here : http://bl.ocks.org/d3noob/8375092 Interactive tree diagrams can help you hide smaller branches unless you want to see them. Hence, user navigation through large tree maps becomes easy and understandable.


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I usually make my documentation 11"x14" (tabloid size). Even so, some diagrams still get too large, so on the main diagram I'll show blank placeholders and diagram those subsections individually. Label each placeholder with an ID number so the subsections on the subsequent pages can be more easily found. I've done this plenty of times, usually needing just ...


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It's obviously a dark pattern to help engaging with the user. Even though Amazon tries to justify the situation, it feels like a cheap excuse; transparency is paramount in commercial transactions. I can't think of any reason to hide the price from the user; only for some mysterious interest of the company. And when you set the interests of a company before ...


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Some questions you should ask... Is this a highly complex process that requires so many steps? Sometimes it is... e.g. I'm signing up for a new mobile plan and number. Most of the time it's not. Either way, always ask if you can simplify the flow. Are there info that don't need to be collected at this point in time? Or you can handle it with a set of default ...



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