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8

No, it's not always necessary. System-defined screens are not obligatory, and there is no need to reproduce clone pages/elements with minor changes. Alternatives to hi-fi prototypes are lo-fi wireframes, user journey maps, PRDs. Yes, paper sketches/prototypes are legitimate prototypes if they are detailed enough and capture/highlight on all important parts. ...


6

To avoid ambiguity I would go for something like this: The benefits of doing this is that the user is given a clear message that something is going on and more importantly that they should not leave the current page until it has finished. Maybe even give a lighter green for the "not yet completed" portion of the bar.


3

Just to add to the other answers, you should actually avoid making the mocks look finished until the functionality is also finished. To quote Joel Spolsky: If you show a nonprogrammer a screen which has a user interface which is 100% beautiful, they will think the program is almost done. (source) To this, I would add that even people who aren't ...


3

Regarding "Perceived Speed" - research shows that you should never start a progress bar at zero regardless of how long a process will take to complete. Edit: this research is actually talking about a different use case, however, I noticed that Apple always starts their generic progress bar with a little bit filled in so I'd say it applies in this case as ...


2

Perforce is the best change management software that I have used. It used to be free for a simple two user system, but now that seems to have been expanded to 20 users..! Set up a P4D server somewhere, and then install the P4 client on your local machine(s). Then, you simply book in all of your existing documents, and simply check-out the document that you ...


2

There are several different ways I have seen this done, Some companies tell you prior to you submitting payment while for other companies you see that once you have paid and look on the "order tracking" pages. A specific example which I feel works very well is as follows: The company is Very. When you submit an order you are taken to the order delivery ...


2

In fact, this should be written in your agreement, where you agree to provide the system design services and they agree to get you info that you require. When it comes to UX or UCD (user-centered design), requirements, including TA description, PRD and use cases are the most crucial info you can get from your employer/client. That would be the first thing ...


2

You're right that one practice might not suit every single company. What's more, it might even differ from dev to dev. The simplest way you can go is just ask the devs what's their preferred way of working. Some people hate having someone else looking at their screens, while others may have lots of questions and would rather have you around. It varies from ...


2

How to observe different roles "An installation job usually has around 2-3 people working on different jobs (roof crew does installations, ground crew does prep work, etc). How would one conduct a CI with so many different roles?" Option 1: Recruit help and have multiple people observing the different roles at the same installation. This might be good ...


1

Some questions you should ask... Is this a highly complex process that requires so many steps? Sometimes it is... e.g. I'm signing up for a new mobile plan and number. Most of the time it's not. Either way, always ask if you can simplify the flow. Are there info that don't need to be collected at this point in time? Or you can handle it with a set of default ...


1

I think this is perhaps a bit of the 'lipstick on a pig' situation. I agree with you in that the ideal UX incorporates a UI that is compatible with the business logic and technology that's running it. I'm often asked to design 'the ideal' independent of the particular technology. This can be a fun exercise, but rarely produces a result that is optimized ...


1

Well, I can't comment on the perceived speed/performance part because you can make it as fast and smooth by just playing with the animation. Beauty is subjective, so I can't really comment on that. The only thing I can note is this, the distraction levels are quite high when the button suddenly turns into a circular loader. This issue can be resolved by ...


1

This sounds extremely frustrating and a very old-school way of developing. Bringing in agile methodologies might just save you and your sanity. Start by working with the client about what features they want developed. This needs to include all dependencies and acceptance criteria - documented! All stakeholders (Marketing etc. ) need to sign-off these ...


1

It's called "extra site navigation". Just connect users to other team sites via navigation that resides on every unique domain/site. This is also used when a parent company (e.g., sears, etc.) connects users to their brands (e.g, lands' end, etc.). Examples of extra site navigation: Sears (top bar with brand logos)) ESPN (e.g., editions, cities, etc.) ...


1

Yes, I agree with what @TMiller has said. The thing being that you need to keep the neutrality to not to trigger any direction of the minds of the stakeholders. It becomes fatal in the later stage. I have found in many cases that after showing the initial mockups(not well planned), product owners who cannot see the small yet important difference tend to ...



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