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28

I would say that a "Print" link is hardly ever necessary, even for content rich websites. You can use print styles in your CSS to have things render differently for print without creating a separate URL. My general rule is that if the browser can do something, there's almost never a reason to duplicate that with something on your page. The only times ...


12

I disagree with the notion that target="_blank" is always bad. In some cases, especially in web applications, it can be very useful, as in the situation you're describing above. (And I've also met a breed of web designers who hate it simply because the latest W3C spec says it's illegal...) The reason UI designers don't like it is because it takes control ...


11

This is not directly related to your question, but here goes... One thing that has always bugged me with "Print" buttons is that you never know if clicking on it will actually print or whether it's going to show you a printer friendly layout. I've seen only one or two web site that have labeled their button "Show Printer Friendly Page" (or something like ...


10

For most people, domain.com is as clear as www.domain.com, and so the preference depends on the designer (although I prefer domain.com) However, naked domains (i.e. domain.com) and the www version are not always synonymous. First make sure that the naked version works. Don't just use the naked version without first checking.


8

You don't need a print version, just like you don't need a "bookmark" button. However, sometimes you will have content that needs a special layout, that you can't do purely with CSS media="print". In this case having a print or "Printer-Friendly" button is a good thing. Example: Google Maps.


8

Give them a "print" option, rather than a "high res" option? Sounds like you might not be speaking your users' language. Also, how much of a pain is this really to users? Maybe there is a reason they save and print the low-res version, e.g., download times, or they worry that they won't get what they see. A simple usability test with a representative user ...


8

"http://domain.com" is unambiguously a website. "www.domain.com" is equally clear but technically not necessarily a website. "domain.com" is likely a website. "go.to" (Tongan TLD) is recognized by the internet savvy as a domain name and likely a website, but many people might miss that meaning. I'd be inclined to use "http://" or "www." as a prefix to ...


5

Have a rollover state right on the image with big letters superimposed that say Click To Download Print Version. Clicking that could either directly download a version in the browser, or more simple, open the high-res version in a new tab where they can right-click to save it. This way, you give them what they want in an obvious manner before then even get ...


4

I would say that unless your print layout is radically different then it's probably not worth mentioning, except perhaps on a Help/FAQ page. While there might be questions the first time someone prints the page, once you explain (or show then the explanation) it should be self evident why the layout is different.


4

'print friendly' functionality is a bit of a hold-over akin to 'font resizing' widgets. It was an attempt to take somewhat hidden browser tools and bring them into the UI of the page itself. The thing with print-friendly, however, is that it can serve purposes other than printing. The typical alternate use for a print-friendly link is on news sites or ...


4

I think most people nowadays understand it by first-level domain name (i.e. .com or .net, etc) so I believe you may drop the www. part.


4

Printing is an expensive operation, requiring lots of time, ink and paper, so it's generally a good idea to assure users that they're getting what they want and confirm they are printing the right document (this can be an issue if they're printing from a file view interface where they could easily click the wrong file). That suggests a case for a print ...


4

Personally i think a print friendly CSS with default browser behaviour is usually sufficient. However, In addition to the exceptions Glen points out. I find a printer friendly page works well on sites where an article is spread across multiple page such as on NY Times, Inc. Magazine etc. Quite apart from being able to print the entire article i've noticed ...


4

In the U.S., a few years ago when social media was starting to boom, advertisers would often display a logo and state something like "Find us on Facebook" in TV and print media. However they started to realize that fan pages and other non-official profiles made that confusing, so then they started displaying full URL's (i.e., www.facebook.com/CoolCompany) ...


3

It's usually best to follow popular convention. In my area, the print marketing materials I've seen almost always include the www and usually exclude the http/https protocol. Though, if space is an issue, I would expect most anyone with internet access to understand domain.com as well. And I can't think of a marketing scenario in which the protocol prefix ...


3

I would add time of print as one of your columns, and make each column sortable. Also I would add a checkbox with the label view printed jobs or view print history. The display of printed history rows would have a different, more sublime color to distinct from actual jobs. That way the history jobs could be easily recognized even if columns were sorted by ...


3

I disagree with the need to have a printer friendly button open a different page at all. Using CSS you can hide all the things you don't want to print and make whatever changes are desired. Therefor almost every page can be printer friendly by default. The only real exception is paginated lists where you want to print the full list. ...


3

Using www. or not in front of the domain could depend on your audience. To be safe, prepend the domain with www. so there is no doubt. I would recommend all lower-case for esthetics. I have made content for many large companies in the past involving their domain and so far there has been no exception to the domain being lower case (Europe, it may be ...


3

What you describe isn’t so much a print dialog as a fully-featured database querying, reporting, and dissemination tool. That’s a huge chunk of functionality. It’s perhaps half of what the users use the ERP app for (the other half being modifying the database content). It’s too much to squeeze into one dialog. I think you need to break it into pieces. There ...


2

I think this is going to depend on your target audience. Do they know that they can use the browsers "File > Print..." option? If so then remove the option, if not then you might still need it. However, you should be able to change it from a "Printer Friendly" link that destroys your site to a simple "Print" button that invokes the browser's print ...


2

"Thou shalt speak thy user's language" :) While "behind the scenes" it is just printing, your users are thinking in terms of converting a file to another format. I'm sure that even users who know to "print to PDF" can only identify it as "hmm, this has the word PDF, and there's nothing else with PDF, so this must be the one I need". So spare them a thought ...


2

Formatting a page for printing is essential, since some of the user like to print a web page. One example of that is a cooking receipt just because the surrounding environment at the time of cooking isn't suitable for a Laptop or tablet. Technically speaking you need to specify a print CSS and possibly also a "Printer friendly version"-button. The button ...


2

I think you're trying to solve the wrong problem. The two button solution sounds like it's obvious and straight forward and pretty much what you'd expect. Rather than change the buttons and abuse your search facets, I would look into why you feel like you have too many buttons on the page and try to solve that problem. The reason your proposed solution with ...


2

how often are people printing pages outside of 8.5 x 11? I have never printed at 8.5 x 11. I assume this is a U.S. paper size and is in inches. I print at A4, it is the standard printer size in the UK. It is 210mm x 297mm. Don't try to assume what sizes people are printing at, instead make your print styles flexible enough to cater for everyone ...


1

Can you provide a "print layout" view within the app? If users aren't able to make adjustments from within the print dialog, perhaps they could make adjustments prior to invoking it. As others have pointed out, print preview is often handled by the OS. Have you tested this out on your supported OSs? Or have you somehow circumvented this in your app? Bottom ...


1

Although you may loathe the print funtionality, it seems, for a medical piece of software anyway, printing would be one of the most needed use cases. Lots of medical fields still rely on paper imo. What I have used in the past, and seems to work well especially for report like printing that you seem to need, is a print mode of the page. Like Google Maps. ...


1

Since the 'print preview' is a part of the operating system, you probably don't need to make your own. That said, for things like web apps, having a 'print version' that is viewable is often nice simply because, a times, it's a preferred layout even for the screen.


1

There's no 'right' answer to this. Some considerations: allow it to print as-is. Pros: no effort required. Cons: rarely will it print as intended. Use print css to customize the print version. Pros: custom designed just for print. Cons: Users sometimes want it as seen in the browser. Use a print-friendly version of the page as an in-browser page. Pros: ...


1

It's probably not an option to use the high-res version of a picture and stick it in a container having the dimensions of the low-res version, right, and let the user's browser scale it appropriately? Because I can't think of another way to do what you want without re-training the user. Consider adding a big "Print Me" button which links to a page that ...



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