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199

We want it to feel cheap when we buy but not when we give.


45

The psychology behind the $0.99 was explored in depth in Priceless: The Hidden Psychology of Value, which if you ask for my humble opinion, is a life-changing book. Partly the reason for such price tags is that it translates for many as a 'sale' price. Against it, is that it is typically associated with 'hard sale'. The donation payment system is in its ...


20

It's explained in Amazon's website, in this page Why don't we show the price?: Retailers like Amazon have the legal right to set their own prices independently, but some manufacturers place restrictions on how those prices may be communicated. Because our price on this item is lower than the manufacturer's "minimum advertised price," the ...


13

The psychology behind the $99 was explored in depth in Priceless: The Hidden Psychology of Value, which if you ask for my humble opinion, is a life-changing book. 9 is the Magic Number A price such as $99, or $14.95 are known as charm price. Research suggests that the most effective charm price is that ending with 9. A University of Chicago/MIT research ...


9

Pricing strategy is not universal, and what may work on one site might not on another. You really have to do some A/B price testing, and see what works. However, I would always give the person that chose to buy at a higher price, whichever the lower price is. It will save you a lot of animosity if you do that. That said, I read a study that was part of ...


9

This is a strategy usually followed by companies that follow price discrimination as a strategy. This could be because: The cost of providing that product actually depends (usually statistically) on who is asking for it. Think of insurance companies here, where a healthy 18 year old with no history of medical problems is likely to cost a lot less to ...


9

I've been suggested it might be a good idea to require an email address for the first two plans before showing the price. This would also discourage people from staying on your site. I personally would have to be very motivated to leave my email address on your site for a product which I don't even know if I want. I'm not alone in this and price is one of ...


8

Pricing is an important marketing tool and well understood by science in the late 80. Supermarkets were the driver for this research. Shoping at stores is sooo incredible designed, you wouldn't believe it, if they tell you everything they do. If you search for pricing strategies online, you will find a lot of resources at universities of economy. I've read ...


7

As per the article from UX Movement Place Them in Descending Order It’s a lot easier for users to move down on pricing than it is for them to move up. Start them off at the high-end and they won’t be able to ignore your high pricing plans. Start them off at the low-end and they’ll likely ignore the higher pricing plans and consider only ...


6

Depending on what the app does, more creative solutions may be found. As @Peter said, nagging every 5 minutes is extremely annoying and it makes users hate you, right at the point where you most need them to like you. How about nagging them only on startup? Or inserting a waiting period on startup, similarly to what rapidshare et al are doing? It may grow ...


5

Don't hide pricing information from the buyer, especially if there's a chance that information could inspire them to "Proceed to checkout". Also, if they don't see the savings there, they might go to another site to look.


5

Izhaki's answer pretty much covers everything related to the UX and psychology behind the x.99 pricing. But there's more -- the x.99 pricing is the key to a killer marketing strategy -- figures for discounts and offers are cleverly crafted numbers, which are almost always impossible to reach without buying one extra item. Why? Because discounts are offered ...


5

Are you planning that light version anyway? If not, don't bother, give everyone the 30 trial, and then ‘lock’ the application until they pay (have a big “Buy” button) or quit. If you're planning that light version, let them use it for as long as they want, and make sure the full version has enough meat to make them buy it. Nagging me every 5 minutes is the ...


5

One approach you've not mentioned and might work for you is something I've seen VisionApp do with it's latest versions: Provide the full application by default. There is no "lite" version. But then there is a free version that has fewer features. Customers get the full version effectively on trial for n-days, then after that time they can either pay for the ...


5

Perhaps you could consider a design where you have a bar-chart of prices over your period. I have seen a design like that on airline sites, and I liked it a lot. Horizontally, you'd set your arrival dates, and vertically the price. You'd start with a standard-length stay, that the user might customize. I am not sure if showing a single night would make most ...


5

No, I would strongly recommend otherwise. A month or so ago I was searching for a library that was compatible with Xamarin.iOS and Xamarin.Android. Technical stuff aside, I was comparing the product of different companies. Some companies provided a straightforward, fixed price, whereas other companies required you to leave info for a tender. The latter was ...


4

Overall I think that the effect from this will be negative for any sites in which the historical pricing is not a major factor (such as stock market websites). The sites for which it is useful are almost always targeted at professionals that (should) use objective criteria to evaluate whether to buy or not. When dealing with the general public, their ...


4

It all depends on what product you are trying to sell and what question will you be helping the user to answer. These could fundamentally affect how the pricing information is presented. For instance, "which flavor of your product should I be buying?" (lead by feature) is a totally different question from "What is the cheapest price I can buy your product ...


3

Don't put your price inside the interaction point. If I am looking for a price then buttons are perceived as grey matter. I don't expect to find the answer there. I'm looking for specific visual clues: a dollar sign ($), the words "price" or "for only", a number with .99 after it. I can appreciate wanting to be tasteful, but your primary goal is ...


3

I too started out with a 30 day trial model. Now a days I provide all the funtionality for free, except the ability to save bigger projects. In order to save big projects the user must pay for the product.


3

My personal opinion would be to use one CTA per item and here is why: One CTA per My thought process: Observe choices I like plan "L" A dedicated button, hoorah! :) I bet if I press that button then the sign-up screen will not force me to choose again Yay! the sign-up screen is clearly marked with what I want, and it even has a <select> box for me ...


3

Asking a user for anything is a barrier to entry I've seen some websites ask for a list of friends email before you can use it and see if it is even worth recommending which is ridiculous. Let me answer your question with another question... Would you go into a grocery store if someone at the entrance required your mailing address? If you have ...


3

Many websites utilize "pricing windows" (unofficial term) to segregate what price applies to what service. I have created a basic mockup for you based on your question: Examples: Soundcloud GoDaddy


3

I would go for something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note that: You show the user all his options The user can clearly see that the option on the right side have the best price. With the text "Currently selected price" you give the user the impression that HE are selecting the PRICE, not that the ...


2

I know this question is old, and the purpose of misleading prices has been covered, but I don't see any explanations about why donations are round amounts. Simply put, taking donations as whole numbers is more convenient for charities. They don't charge taxes or give change, so they list preset donation amounts without fractions of whole numbers (eg, ...


2

Well from a true User Experience point of view, no, it's not a good idea. If the user is interested in a product then they want to know how much it is in order to make a decision about purchasing it or not. However, from having done B2B websites in the past this issue often crops up. There are a variety of reasons for not showing prices though. Different ...


2

I worked for a certain large online retailer for several years. I can tell you there's a continual back-and-forth going on between retailers and manufacturers on the issue of Minimum Advertised Price (or MAP). It's literally discussed at almost every meeting with a manufacturer. A few years ago, letting customers click to see the price instead of adding to ...


2

I have a book somewhere (don't remember which, need to look it up) which explains that it's more important to have a short number, rather than low. $9.99 looks longer (larger) than $10. Then again, $10.00 looks larger than $9.99 The same book suggested a whole different approach: If you have a product of $10, introduce another product of -say- $12. Even if ...


2

Yes, why not? If the price is one of the main decisive factors, I cannot see anything against it. You should just make sure that the price user will see after clicking the ad is the same (which is most difficult when speaking abou distribution through many indeoendent channels, out of which each can set price which is different from the suggested one). By ...


2

I would suggest that you have obvious buttons on your homepage that lead to both the Overview and the Plans. "From $299" is not a call to action, so as a user I may not be really sure what I'm going to get. Better to have buttons like... "Learn more about our advertising" (links to Overview) "View Plans and Sign up" (links to Plans).



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