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11

There is a government agency that you must apply to to receive permission. Otherwise, the UX police will come and get you. Seriously, you can say it now. Wait... Ok now. Welcome to the craft. Read alot. Spread the word. Help train others. Love the user.


7

Create a website for your portfolio. It is in essence the same as what you would need for a photography portfolio, so you have many templates to choose from in many content management systems (such as Wordpress, Joomla, Drupal, etc). Display it on dedicated portfolio sites. I have hired people directly off such sites based primarily on their portfolio, ...


7

Anything that could represent your knowledge in Information Architecture and User Experience is perfectly valid portfolio material. It doesn't really matter what's in the portfolio as long as the consumer of the content understand how great you are, and why it would be a loss NOT to hire you. So, yes, Wireframes, Mockups, Use cases, Requirement analysis, ...


7

I think the best way to represent it is to...not represent it and let the work done speaks for itself. The association between the skills and the percentage cannot convey the intended message, it is wrong from a semantic point of view: knowing a tool doesn't make the person good/great at the job and "knowing" 85% of Graphic Design would be simply ...


6

My suggestion is not to do this. Hue doesn't have an inherent order (ROYGBIV is surprisingly non-intuitive especially when you have to compare across the rainbow). "Is teal before or after forest green?" And individual colors communicate entirely the wrong meaning: e.g., when the project is 'red' does that mean it's behind? or in trouble? or blocked? Not ...


6

No, no and no - don't even include the wireframes/flows etc for unreleased products. At least not until you have sought and gained written permission to do so. It might also be that your employment contract prevents you from such disclosure, especially potentially to other employers. Obviously written permission might be a bit tricky to follow through with ...


6

You have had some great inputs but in my experience , they key thing which most UX recruiters and UX hiring managers look for is the process with which you have achieved with your end goal. While you can go with a number of different approaches with regards to how to showcase your content (slideshows, carousals, lightboxes) the end result is often not the ...


6

Offering no way to distinguish between clickable and non-clickable images is going to cause confusion, and having the click provide no benefit will cause annoyance, so I think you're stuck with providing some way to identify which images are clickable and which aren't. As an alternative to borders (which I agree could look messy), you could add a ...


5

I have worked on my own site through countless iterations and have never been happy. I'll paraphrase the old adage, "A designer who designs their own site has a fool for a client" :) This is what I have learned through feedback on my own site, from hiring and seeing the successful sites of people who have been hired. Go with some version of option one. ...


4

Besides the usual images showing various stages, I would love to see one or two projects from start to finish. From conceptual sketches to polished product. UX isn't a destination, it's a journey. Show that journey and you will stand out. It would also be good to see some analysis of websites showing where you think they went wrong and why. Better if ...


4

We're looking at a lot of portfolios these days. The high fidelity glossy finished UI is always nice to look at, but what we're looking for is a portfolio that can demonstrate a working knowledge of gathering UI design requirements (heuristic evals, use case reviews, stakeholder interviews, usability test data) and demonstrate a process by which "problem ...


4

I would not generally include the chrome, because it introduces unnecessary clutter - including such as in your example, details like other bookmarks, address bar and operating system specifics that detract from the overall context which is the content you intend to show off. The amazon, bitly, eBay, tumblr and other bookmark icons are surplus to ...


4

Mockups, etc. are fine. In fact they're good. When I look at a portfolio I'm looking to understand how a person works - now what the final results look like. The final results are - in any non-trivial project - down to many people. I need to understand how the person helped do that. Mocks, wireframes, pencil sketches, etc. are all good. One thing though. ...


4

As a UX designer I design experiences, and that might not include the final wireframes. I very rarely get anywhere near final visual designs. I leave that to visual designers or interaction designers. Your portfolio is what I would call an interaction design portfolio. It includes a lot of the final product and what a few wireframes. In other places ...


3

I can't speak for the sites that you mentioned, but anything that you do which gets you to understand how people use products and services will help you learn more about UX. The closer you get to users, the better - and doing testing is about as close as you will get. However, to get the most out of it follow these steps: Analyse what you will be testing ...


3

Gathering that you are providing details as to what the clients problem was and your unique solution and how you leveraged the necessary technology/tools to accomplish this - along with screenshots, these definitely sound more like case studies... Generally, a portfolio simply shows the what kind of work was done, and the end result. Answer: Case Study


3

In this particular case, screenshots excluding the browser are fine. We may include the browser when - a context is expressly needed or desirable - a particular browser is referenced, recommended, etc., - part of the browser features (say, the address bar) is referenced - the UI has a white background without border - use the browser to frame it - to ...


2

I thought http://vizualize.me was a good example of a neat way to make a pretty visualization using only text + numbers. It takes the text of a linkedin profile and generates charts, etc. For example, mine is http://vizualize.me/xaotica Here are some other cool ideas for text / data visualization: ...


2

There is a solution for a text portfolio, but I'm not sure it's one you can achieve on your own. So think of all e-books in Kindle - Amazon gather your highlighted markings and shares them online, so readers can see snippets of what other people considered to be interesting or otherwise outstanding text. If you had this sort of information it would be ...


2

Have you considered a faceted approach? If you examine the example portfolio you linked to you might notice that some of their projects appear under more than one category. Rhodes Scholarship for example is under both Non-Profit and also Education. Similarly you could have top level categories of UX Projects, Design Projects, and Methods. (Within UX ...


2

Clients or prospectives or your future job employers, will definitely like to see your PROCESS, the approaches you have taken to deal the problems and design solutions. I would recommend to have them as-it-is in converted digital format, such that they are safe by time. Now, these can go into a section called "Processess", "Approaches", "Methodologies" ...


2

UX involves a number of technical and soft skills. Here are some methods to improve both to get you started with your portfolio: Technical Skills In terms of what you should focus on, I would recommend HTML/CSS/JS in order to quickly iterate wireframes and prototypes. W3school tutorials (intro to HTML/CSS/PHP/JS) and a good reference Lynda.com tuts ...


2

I have always liked seeing process. For me process validates the end result and how you work.


2

Strictly speaking, it is not very usable way to define ones creative skills in such way. But it is non-standard, creative and emotion arousal, so it works! And it could be more funny and creative to increase some progress bar while someone watching the page. For example, suddenly Logo Design skill is increased and pop-up with newly designed logo with link ...


2

Start making things You're not going to get paid until you can show you have some talent. The only way to do that is to make up commissions for yourself. The upside is that your fictional client can be a really awesome one. What's your dream project? Congratulations, you just won the bid! Now give yourself some realistic goals and boundaries and get to ...


2

Most design students are able to develop a portfolio of projects they worked on while they are in school. Since I'm guessing you aren't a design student, I suggest that you take a course on UX/Interaction Design or Human Computer Interaction (HCI) - especially one that requires you to develop an interactive project and/or create a prototype. This way, ...


2

Unless the flows themselves are patented, you should be able to generalize everything by stripping out all the client's information to add to your portfolio. Wireframes and such should be allowed at the very least. Once you have that done it is best to confirm with the client that what you are posting to the public is acceptable. At times they may ...


2

Options: ask your NDA'd clients if there is anything you could show. They may be fine in the context of a portfolio. add to your contracts the right to reproduce client work (within reason) in your personal portfolio obfuscate the work you do under NDA (Use 'Corporation, Inc.' as the logo, 'widget' and 'sprocket' as product names, etc.) show the work ...


1

John's answer was great, but I wanted to elaborate a bit on the portfolio aspect. I'm also starting out in UX and I don't have much experience beyond a six-month course I took. Here's what I've done to build a portfolio: Start a blog and post everyday. Contact and talk to every professional UX person you can Learn how to use tools that will increase your ...



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