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49

Depends why I was on that page. Stack Exchange sites have that warning, which I appreciate because I may have a half-typed answer left in a tab when I try to close the browser. If it's just begging/bribing me to stay, then I think it would annoy.


25

Forcing the user to do anything creates a User Experience that can feel desperate and low rent. There are many sites that will use any trick available to hook the customer - the question is do you want to work on a site like that? It's a moral issue more than a UX one.


11

Subscription popups that appear when a page is loaded are easily annoying, but may not necessarily affect bounce rates negatively. However, the most important factor to consider when working with any kind of forced functionality is that it will come loaded with negative connotations. Users tend to criticize advertisements not because of their very ...


7

It may sound strange but was once led by this type of intrusive message. I was searching for online data host service, and after looking at the suggested plans I clicked the back button. The message appeared giving me a better suggestion for a plan, and it happened that I took it. The lesson learned here is to recognize the user intention. For example, you ...


7

I would tackle the problem the other way round: Don't make the users want to leave in the first place. When users visit a webpage, they have a goal. Some look for information. Some want to buy products. Some want to compare prices. Some look for a possibility to contact the company, etc. Showing an Alert with a discount offer when the user wants to leave ...


6

Let's try bringing this back to basic emotions: It's a reasonably safe statement to say people don't like being blocked from doing something. It doesn't matter whether you're on a website or in a physical store. When you want to leave and something gets in your way, then the action of being blocked has a negative effect. I had a thought that there may be a ...


5

I've noticed on Twitter's web site that if I write text into the new tweet composition field and then close the window/tab without posting the tweet, the field is re-populated with that text automatically if I go back to Twitter. I think this is far better UX than annoying or scaring the user with an alert, and given a fairly straightforward form, would be ...


4

The only acceptable reason to block navigation is to protect the user from losing data. Forms that are half filled, files half uploaded, posts half written - in those cases this is actually helpful, as it protects the user if they accidentally close the browser or tab. However using it to try to prevent the customer from leaving? Not only is this bad UX, ...


4

So long as you are confident you abide by any relevant laws and consumer rights then you can design the PoS how you like, but having designed a UI for large PoS systems, I know it's a real nightmare area for legal requirements. Under some (probably many) laws, the consumer must be able to see clear details of the price being charged for each item, along ...


4

Use an input field which triggers the numeric keyboard. Users will be familiar to this as it is a UI that is native to their device. <input type="number"> When using this method don't forget that the chrome desktop browser will display a spinner control. The spinner can be hidden using a bit of css: input::-webkit-outer-spin-button, ...


3

Perhaps take a step back and see if the application can fit its environment better. As I interpret him, Alan Cooper prescribes that the user should never have to hit Save (or Cancel); applications should update continuously, defer validity checking to the last possible minute, and have excellent auditing and rollback. Assume the that normal case is that ...


2

A couple of years ago I designed the ui for a high profile PoS system used by many of the major supermarkets and delis in the UK. I can definitely say that method 2 has the greater benefits. Users do not need to be presented with options until the exact time that they are relevant. Thus selecting a category, selecting an item and (if relevant to the item ...


2

It would be hard to convince me that you would ever want to display the price as the "option" when choosing shipping, the primary reason being that the "description" of the shipping option is always (in my experience), the unique identifier for the type of shipping that you are requesting. If you consider the most common traits for shipping options, there ...


1

If there is enough space, I would present them the options with all the details visible. Another otion is to predent them in a dropdown. Both suggestions below:


1

Commonly, what primes over price is what you're paying for. On that note, I would recommend explaining the type of service you can get and make the price secondary, i.e. "Receive it tomorrow (+$12)"


1

Your question is looking for "research or published articles about this subject" A very noble goal, you have several answers here offer opinions and nothing concrete. You say you looked and did not find anything, given the subject it is difficult to imagine how any reliable data could be collected. There would only be two possible sources. User completed ...


1

I have not faced this situation or worked in such a system, but thinking about it, this can be looked at it two ways: a. Is this the right way to incentivise ? b. How does one monitor/manage The first really calls for design thinking to be applied to understand customers and employess' natuaral motivation and then build process that align with that. For ...


1

Although I haven't designed such a system, I have a few ideas about how you could make it work. The major issue is that the cashier has been given too much authority. He is not only generating the lead, but is also 'marking' it as genuine. A good solution to this would be to make the application a two part process. The cashier generates the lead and enters ...


1

I think that the action bar is only there for touchscreens, as they don't have hover states. Desktop applications do have hover states. Here, I'd guess the solution would be closer to Fitt's law; an interpretation of Fitt's law could be: put the action close to (and in line with) the object the action is referring to. So, have a column, which has hidden ...


1

In Europe, McDonald's recently introduced a customer-facing touchscreen POS: Obviously this one is much more graphical and visually compelling because it's customer-facing and yours isn't. Nevertheless, there are some takeaways from this system: Relying on visual display of the items in question can help improve selection speed in a grid interface. I ...


1

The decision is easy when you know your users' process. So, despite any recommendations received here, you still need to talk to the cashiers who will be using the system and observe their interactions with the current system. In your situation, it looks like the second one is the best since its item customization workflow is the most straightforward. ...



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