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14

If the war room is for making a tight deadline, then I'd say the comment from @Roger-Attrill is perfect. Especially the coffee. Don't forget the coffee. However, if it's used for brainstorm sessions, there might be some other components you can use for an effective and most of all creative brainstorm session. Make sure people inside the room don't get ...


10

There are many studies about colour, but what is important is to use bright colours for the things that require action. We associate actions with the traffic lights. Green go, yellow check if you have time and red stop. Your actions are: Open - Go, so definitely green To be confirmed - Requires check - definitely yellow Postponed- Requires a bright ...


5

In my primary dayjob such projects are usual. And they are really the mess, and the experience is worth a book :) But I'll try to be short. At first accept in your mind that huge projects can't be perfect when you are alone warrior strugling. This will save your spirit from depression and months of nightmares with ugly controls and prototypes (I had). But ...


5

First you design the system as if there will be no training. You have to consciously try to imagine that training will not be an option and make the system as usable as possible. This is no trivial thing, as some aspects may need training, no matter how good the UX is. Once you have done that, you then design the training. This way you should be able to ...


5

I'd have to point you to this BBC Internet Blog post for an excellent reference. This blog post describes the technology strategy the BBC Future Media department is using to evolve from a relational content model and static publishing framework towards a fully dynamic semantic publishing (DSP) architecture. You will need to define and describe a set of ...


5

In describing a place where "where they sit and and brainstorm" the term think tank is perhaps more appropriate. The term war room originated as a term to describe the command and control center to wage a real war. The English war rooms that Churchill used in World War II are an example. A key characteristic of any war room is the need to keep all ...


4

It sounds like your "down the road" wireframes are a bit too far along on the fidelity spectrum. In other words, they're too detailed if you feel much "pain" when the ground changes under your feed (which it often does, in your case as well as mine). Have you tried just using pen/marker/paper (lo-fi) for your longer term wireframes and saving Visio ...


4

It looks like you've made a great start. You could condense a lot of your notes by using this structure: "As a <user type> I want to <activity> so that <goal>" e.g. "As a mobile/tablet user I want to search dishes so that I can find the dish I'm looking for" There's an article about this technique here: ...


3

This is the whole point of UX design. There are various situations and thus various ways to plug in UX design in a project, but the most simple process would be: Analysis and Strategy What are your users up for? What information they seek? Do they at all? What are the project goals? What do you want to achieve? How to make these two meet? (This is the ...


3

This is more of a program management question than UX but since I end up doing both on a daily basis here is what I would do: List out the purpose of the form List out the user flow or wizard if any (assuming you have a multi-step registration process List out all the fields in each step along with the length allowed for those fields, the validation and ...


3

Personally I think there would be no issue with you contacting the interviewer directly and clarifying exactly what is required. We can speculate on here all you like but there were two people involved in the interview and only one of them can tell you what is required. Your diligence in ensuring that both parties (you and them) are speaking the same ...


3

The one constant reason for either brainstorm or war room being successful or not has always been the facilitator, in my experience at least. This is the hardest job, this person needs to be able to sense where the discussion and keep everyone on task, keep the momentum going and also have a really good feel for when to let people go off on tangents and ...


2

Before you start to work on a solution, you need to fully understand the system and truly what the issues are. There will be users with years of experience it would be worth getting their input. I would take some time to immerse yourself in the program. Perhaps get someone to give you some scenarios? I would recommend you create a survey which a large ...


2

AFAIK, there is no such color binding for Gantt charts, so any hard binding would be making user adapt to some idea custom for such tool, and making users adapt to something uncommon is (or just: may be) bad UX. Thus, there are two things I would consider: try to follow some current (best?) practice, like here: ...


2

You can't get more thorough than Designing For the Digital Age by Kim Goodwin. It covers – in incredible detail for all conceivable situations – a project from inception to production. Explains how to build a team, how to properly research, how to build personas, and so on. It's a heavy read, but there's something in it for everyone. Highly recommended. ...


2

I have been in similar situations in a lot of projects, and the best advice I can provide is that regardless of the stage of the project you are in, if they do not have a system/process/standard for maintaining the consistency of the designs then you will continue to perpetuate the problems that they have until you do. From experience, nothing will ...


1

What is it exactly that you want to communicate? As far as I'm aware, the purpose of a gantt chart is to visualize the break down a project into a series of smaller tasks. In this context I'd say the open tasks are most important, the unconfirmed tasks are second and the rest is hardly relevant, except perhaps for the project manager. So all you need to do ...


1

One book I'm going through now is Interactive Design by Andy Pratt & Jason Nunes. It focuses on UX in general, but introduces you to UX practices and methods through real-life examples, which in turn gets you thinking about how to consider it in your own application. It covers some design principles, such as Affordance" and gives concrete examples of ...


1

To summarize the whole UX process for a new website design and development, I categorize it into three stages. 1. Need finding or Requirement Analysis: Starts prior to site design. It focuses on the investigating the need for website 'X', its users, competition, and targets. Methods: Brainstorming between stakeholders, Marketing Reports, Competitor's ...


1

One option is "on the job training" download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This of course can be overused but sprinkled in it can be effective. A few important pieces to this include: Being able to dismiss if I don't care, a link to learn more and, most importantly, a way to keep track that the user has seen the message ...


1

Is it possible to redesign in smaller chunks. Rather than risking everything on one large redesign pick off the a quick win and get some runs on the board. It is always critical to start getting some runs on the board. If you can start showing some value being returned to the business you may be able to start pushing for extra resources and even the ...


1

Agree with the rest of the answers. One benefit you have with redesign is that you have and existing user base you can work with to figure out what user needs are, what they like/hate in the current system. We worked on a big redesign project and started with interviews and observing users using existing system. Observations were extremely useful since it ...


1

If possible, start with user research. Develop personas, scenarios and other artifacts first. This will help you discover which areas are the highest prioirty. Take a look at About Face 3 by Cooper et al. (ISBN 0-4700-8411-1) Cooper's Goal Directed design works pretty well to tackle user interaction and design projects. Also, take a look at "process" on ...


1

I usually make storyboards in PowerPoint and put them on a central file share. (Used to be Sharepoint, which I liked). This is a starting point for the developers. I usually work with them on the actual product and things shift and change from the original PowerPoint design. In the end, the PowerPoint only has a weak link to the real thing. It becomes ...



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